GE Aviation has acquired the assets of Morris Technologies, and its sister company, Rapid Quality Manufacturing, precision manufacturing companies operating in suburban Cincinnati, Ohio.  Terms were not disclosed.

The two privately-held companies, with about 130 Cincinnati-area employees, specialize in additive manufacturing, an automated process for creating rapid prototypes and end-use production components.

With this acquisition, GE Aviation continues to expand its engineering and manufacturing capabilities to meet its growing jet engine production rates over the next five years. In addition to acquiring these manufacturing processes, GE Aviation will open two new production plants in the United States next year.

"Morris Technologies and Rapid Quality Manufacturing are parts of our investment in emerging manufacturing technologies," said Colleen Athans, vice president and general manager of the Supply Chain Division at GE Aviation.  "Our ability to develop state-of-the-art manufacturing processes for emerging materials and complex design geometry is critical to our future.  We are so fortunate to have Morris Technologies and Rapid Quality Manufacturing just minutes from our headquarters.  We know them well."

The additive manufacturing process involves taking digital designs from computer aided design (CAD) software, and laying horizontal cross-sections to manufacture the part.  The process creates the layered cross-sections using a laser beam to melt the raw material. These parts tend to be lighter than traditional forged parts because they don't require the same level of welding.  Additive manufacturing also generates less scrap material during the fabrication process.

Founded by Cincinnati natives Greg Morris, Wendell Morris and Bill Noack in 1994, Morris Technologies (Sharonville) and Rapid Quality Manufacturing (West Chester) have supplied parts to GE Aviation for several years, as well as to GE Power Systems and our Global Research Center. The companies have made everything from lightweight parts for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for the U.S. military to hip replacement prototypes for the medical field.  The Sharonville and West Chester facilities will become part of GE Aviation's global network of manufacturing operations.

Morris Technologies and Rapid Quality Manufacturing have already been contracted by GE Aviation to produce components for the best-selling LEAP jet engine being developed by CFM International, a 50/50 joint company of GE and Snecma (SAFRAN) of France.  The LEAP engine, which is scheduled to enter service in the middle of this decade on three different narrow-body aircraft, has already received more than 4,000 engine orders before the first full engine has even gone to test.

Morris Technologies and Rapid Quality Manufacturing focus on the aerospace, energy, oil & gas, and medical industries.

GE Aviation, an operating unit of GE (NYSE: GE), is a leading provider of jet and turboprop engines, components, and integrated systems for commercial, military, business and general aviation aircraft. GE Aviation has a global service network to support these offerings.

For more information, visit: www.geaviation.com

Published in GE

Morris Technologies, Inc. (MTI), a service provider specializing in additive manufacturing and CNC machining, has acquired a DMU 50 five-axis machine from Mori Seiki.  The DMU 50 machine is a state-of-the-art mill that features a performance-enhancing NC swivel rotary table, high rigidity, and a large bearing diameter in the B- and C-axis.  The equipment is the latest addition to MTI's world-class machine shop.

A five-axis machining center utilizes two axes in addition to the standard three axes (X/Y/Z), so the tool can move along five different planes. This allows the part to be fixtured just once as the tools and the table rotate according to the CNC specifications.  The result is parts that are produced with high precision and detail and tight tolerances.

Morris Technologies will utilize the DMU 50 machine to produce complex parts for the medical, aerospace, and other industries.  The new mill enhances the company's machining capabilities, which also includes EDM and Swiss turn.

Adam Collins, machining manager, believes this acquisition takes Morris Technologies to a new level.  "Until now, we've had a very complete shop, but the one missing piece of the puzzle was a five-axis (machine)," says Collins.  "We now have a facility that rivals others in the industry.  This is really exciting for us."

As the global leader in additive metal manufacturing, Morris Technologies also will use the five-axis machine to complement the company's extensive additive manufacturing capabilities.

Based in Cincinnati, Ohio, Morris Technologies, Inc. (MTI) has been on the cutting edge of manufacturing technologies since 1994.  MTI's heavy investment in research and development has enabled them to evolve into the global leader in additive-metal manufacturing processes and advance technologies by offering new materials and developing new hardware.  MTI also specializes in end-to-end product development, from engineering to prototyping to low-volume manufacturing.

For more information, visit: www.morristech.com or www.dmgmoriseikiusa.com/five-axis-dmu-series/dmu-50

Published in Morris Technologies

Imagine opening a gift on Christmas morning and finding a body part in the box.  This happened to CJ Howard in 2010...well, sort of.

CJ was a normal, active teenager in 2002. He liked to snowboard, run, hike, cycle, and swim. And then one day he was diagnosed with osteogenic sarcoma, a form of cancer that led to part of his leg being amputated just below the knee.  He was 18 years old.

In 2008 he met Mandy Ott, a mechanical engineer working for a large aerospace company and an avid climbing enthusiast. He wasn't going to be deterred from joining her in her avocation.

Everything worked just fine, except for one thing: the prosthetic was quickly ruining the expensive climbing shoe on that foot. CJ would have the shoes resoled, but eventually would have to purchase new pairs.

Around this time, Mandy was working with Morris Technologies.  She was aware that the folks at MTI are experts in direct metal laser sintering (DMLS). A custom foot was an ideal "fit" for additive metal manufacturing. So a titanium foot was created.

CJ had taken part in the design of the foot, but by Christmas 2010, he had forgotten about it.

"I was completely shocked," says CJ. "When she handed me the box with the foot I was totally expecting to pull out a [climbing] rope, not a shiny, new climbing foot.  Definitely a one-of-a-kind gift!"

The new foot has advantages for CJ. Mandy reports that "the stiffness keeps him from slipping (unlike what he was using before), and the size helps him with crack climbing (and keeps him from getting stuck so easily)."

Other good news: CJ is nine years cancer-free April 2012.

Based in Cincinnati, Ohio, Morris Technologies, Inc. (MTI) has been on the cutting edge of additive manufacturing technologies since 1994.   MTI invests heavily in R&D and specializes in end-to-end product development, from engineering to prototyping to low-volume manufacturing.

For more information, visit: www.morristech.com

Published in Morris Technologies

Morris Technologies, Inc. (MTI), the global leader of additive metal manufacturing, is proud to announce the availability of Stainless 17-4 PH for DMLS.

Stainless 17-4 PH has been in development at MTI since March 2011 and was released with full heat treatment properties in October 2011. This material is precipitation hardened and heat treated to exceed the minimum requirement of the AMS standards. It is comparable to typical commercial wrought properties. MTI offers multiple heat treatment options, ranging from H900 to H1150, yielding a range of material properties tailored to engineering applications.

The introduction of 17-4 PH is the latest addition to the 11 other alloys Morris Technologies offers for producing metal parts using additive manufacturing. A material property data sheet for 17-4 PH is located on the Morris Technologies website.

Morris Technologies employs a Research & Development team focused on additive metal equipment, process, and alloy development. This enables MTI to develop materials and introduce them to the market in a timely manner.

Based in Cincinnati, Ohio, Morris Technologies, Inc. (MTI) has been on the cutting edge of manufacturing technologies since 1994.  MTI's heavy investment in research and development has enabled them to evolve into the global leader in additive-metal manufacturing processes and advance technologies by offering new materials and developing new hardware.  MTI also specializes in end-to-end product development, from engineering to prototyping to low-volume manufacturing.

For more information, visit: www.morristech.com

Published in Morris Technologies

Morris Technologies, Inc. (MTI) has been awarded a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant from the federal government.

Working in conjunction with Tinker Air Force Base, MTI will be developing methodology, processes, and analytical tools required for final machining of metallic aircraft components produced using additive metal manufacturing. The goal is to reduce qualification costs and time versus conventional manufacturing methods. In this endeavor, MTI is partnering with TechSolve, an Edison Technology Center.

As the global leader in additive metal manufacturing, Morris Technologies is ideally suited to conduct aerospace research using DMLS and EBM technologies.  "This is an important step toward helping the USAF resolve their diminishing manufacturing sources and material shortages through the use of additive metal processes," says Lloyd Fields, VP of MTI's Federal Business Unit. "The SBIR program is fundamental to our advancing additive manufacturing technology."

The project is expected to take up to nine months to complete.

Based in Cincinnati, Ohio, Morris Technologies, Inc. (MTI) has been on the cutting edge of manufacturing technologies since 1994.   MTI's heavy investment in research and development has enabled them to evolve into the global leader in additive-metal manufacturing processes and advance technologies by offering new materials and developing new hardware.  MTI also specializes in end-to-end product development, from engineering to prototyping to low-volume manufacturing.

For more information, visit: www.morristech.com

Published in Morris Technologies

Morris Technologies, Inc. (MTI) has purchased an Arcam A2 electron beam melting (EBM) machine. MTI is the global leader in additive-metal manufacturing, and this acquisition enhances their arsenal of product offerings by making the EBM technology available to their customers in aerospace, medical, and other industries.

The Arcam A2 builds functional metal parts layer by layer using metal powder.  The powder is melted by a powerful electron beam to the exact geometry dictated by a 3D CAD model. Parts are built in vacuum at elevated temperatures resulting in stress-relieved parts with material properties better than cast and comparable to wrought material.

The acquisition of the EBM additive manufacturing machine will offer advantages to MTI's customers. "The Arcam A2 is a complementary technology to our existing DMLS additive manufacturing machines and will allow us to offer additional capabilities and solutions for our customers," says Greg Morris, CEO of Morris Technologies.  "Coupled with our extensive, world-class machining and finishing technologies, we believe that we can offer cost and time savings for a number of customer geometries and projects."

The Arcam machine will be installed at MTI's facility and ready for manufacturing in January 2012.  Initially, Morris Technologies will be focusing on building geometries from titanium (Ti 64). They plan ongoing testing of other alloy powders and will introduce other options as appropriate.

Based in Cincinnati, Ohio, Morris Technologies, Inc. (MTI) has been on the cutting edge of manufacturing technologies since 1994.   MTI's heavy investment in research and development has enabled them to evolve into the global leader in additive-metal manufacturing processes and advance technologies by offering new materials and developing new hardware.  MTI also specializes in end-to-end product development, from engineering to prototyping to low-volume manufacturing.

For more information, visit: www.morristech.com

Published in Morris Technologies

Today EOS GmbH Electro Optical Systems, the worldwide leading manufacturer of laser-sintering systems, announced that Morris Technologies, Inc. (MTI), the largest supplier of  direct metal laser-sintering (DMLS) parts worldwide, has purchased an EOSINT M 270 system to laser-sinter titanium. The machine will be installed in Xtended Mode, including new features which greatly improve the performance for producing titanium parts, enabling these to be built much faster and in enhanced quality compared to the first generation titanium process, which was launched in 2007.

This is the first North American purchase of an EOSINT M 270 in Xtended Mode, and it is the ninth DMLS system that MTI has acquired from EOS — the most of any lab or manufacturer in the world. MTI will use the new system to offer rapid prototyping and manufacturing in titanium to its customers in the aerospace and medical industries.

“We were the first U.S. firm to install DMLS equipment,” says Greg Morris, CEO/COO of MTI, “and yearly demand for laser-sintering services has increased. We expect interest in titanium parts to follow the same strong demand curve.”

“Since 2006, Morris Technologies has partnered with EOS to help us identify product applications and introduce our systems to the manufacturing industry,” says Jim Fendrick, vice president of EOS of North America. “With the purchase of this new titanium-based system, MTI stays among the leading suppliers who are willing to explore DMLS and the breakthroughs it holds for innovative companies.”

The EOSINT M 270 system uses laser-sintering to additively manufacture parts layer-by-layer. A range of metal materials is available, including steels, cobalt- and nickel-based superalloys and titanium alloys. EOS Titanium Ti64 is a pre-alloyed Ti6AL4V alloy with excellent mechanical properties and corrosion resistance, low specific weight, and biocompatibility. Parts built from this alloy can be machined, spark-eroded, welded, micro shot-peened, polished and coated as needed. Typical uses include dental, orthopedic, and airframe applications.

About Morris Technologies

Morris Technologies Inc. (MTI) is a rapid prototyping company that turns designs into production-quality metal parts in hours through its wide range of capabilities, including DMLS. DMLS offers unparalleled advantages because it eliminates tooling, makes parts with complex internal and external geometries in a single operation, and produces multiple parts at the same time.  MTI, the global leader in DMLS capability, now operates nine DMLS machines, eight of which feature the latest generation of DMLS technology.

About EOS

EOS was founded in 1989 and is today the world leading manufacturer of laser-sintering systems. Laser-sintering is the key technology for e-Manufacturing, the fast, flexible and cost-effective production of products, patterns and tools. The technology manufactures parts for every phase of the product life cycle, directly from electronic data. Laser-sintering accelerates product development and optimizes production processes. EOS completed its business year 2007/2008 with revenues of approximately 70 million Euros, which is an increase of 17 percent compared to the previous year. The company employs 280 people worldwide, 230 of them at its headquarters in Krailling near Munich, Germany. For more information visit www.eos.info.

Published in EOS

EOS, the world-leading manufacturer of lasersintering systems, has named Morris Technologies as an e-Manufacturing partner. e-Manufacturing describes the fast, flexible and cost-efficient production directly from electronic data. In its partner role, Morris Technologies will support EOS’s efforts in raising the level of acceptance for laser-sintering as a viable production method.

Morris Technologies brings a wealth of laser-sintering expertise into the program, which makes the company an ideal partner for the initiative. The product development firm based in Cincinnati, Ohio, operates four machines for Direct Metal Laser-Sintering (DMLS) and also acted as a pilot customer for the latest EOS material, CobaltChrome MP1.

Morris Technologies will contribute to the e-Manufacturing program by identifying and implementing suitable production applications as well as introducing the manufacturing industry to the opportunities and advantages. “We see EOS as the preferred supplier of layer-manufacturing technologies,” explains Greg Morris, principal and COO of Morris Technologies. The firm, which was the first U.S. organization to install an EOSINT M system, has had tremendous demand for its DMLS-based services and is now the largest DMLS user world-wide. With its capacity of four systems, Morris can quickly react and deliver on opportunities that implement laser-sintering as manufacturing technology. The company sees great potential for e-Manufacturing applications in industries such as aerospace and medical.

Morris, the first US-based e-Manufacturing Partner, joins FKM (Biedenkopf-Wallau, Germany), Materialise (Leuven, Belgium) and the University of Wolverhampton (Wolverhampton, UK) in the e-Manufacturing partnership program.

Published in EOS

EOS, the world-leading manufacturer of lasersintering systems, announced today that Morris Technologies, Inc. (Cincinnati, Ohio) has expanded its applications for Direct Metal Laser-Sintering (DMLS) with a new superalloy material, EOS CobaltChrome MP1. Morris Technologies, a product development firm, is one of a select group of pilot customers who implemented cobalt chrome prior to full commercial release.

Morris Technologies cites high strength, high temperature and corrosion resistance as the main advantages when making prototype and test parts with cobalt chrome. The company, which was the first U.S. organization to install an EOSINT M class machine, has had tremendous demand for its DMLS-based rapid prototyping services. However, it found existing materials could not address many of its clients’ applications.

Greg Morris, principal and COO, said, “There were many projects that needed a rapid prototyping solution, but the clients’ test conditions required elevated temperatures, corrosion resistance and better mechanical properties. Even though it took more time and money, we would end up machining stainless steel, or other alloys, to meet their needs.” In response, the company solicited participation in EOS’s pre-release pilot phase program for the cobalt chrome material.

According to Morris, client reactions to cobalt chrome have been very positive. The properties of the material have created new opportunities for DMLS, and the company cites aerospace and medical applications as its early focus. However, it believes that this is just the beginning. Morris stated, “Materials are the driver. With CobaltChrome MP1, there are many new applications for the technology. So many that we have seen probably less than one percent of all the uses that are possible.”

Morris expects that the material will also usher in more e-Manufacturing applications for end use products. e-Manufacturing describes fast, flexible and costeffective production directly from electronic data.

Through its past projects, Morris has determined that cobalt chrome parts are fully dense and that there is no variance in properties throughout the pieces. Morris also commented that the material builds well, processes easily and requires only minimal work to deliver a smooth surface finish.

Since introducing cobalt chrome, demand has increased substantially. Morris commented, “We have recently purchased two new EOSINT M 270 systems to handle the workload, and anticipate additional purchases as demand dictates.”

CobaltChrome MP1 is now commercially available, along with EOS’s new StainlessSteel 17-4. Titanium alloys are also currently in pilot testing at customer site and scheduled for commercial release early in 2007.

Published in EOS

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