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Attendees seeking to explore the unparalleled benefits that laser-sintering offers to the rapidly expanding unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) industry can get a good start at Booth 1216 at the AUVSI Unmanned Systems North America 2011 (Washington, D.C., Aug. 16-19). There EOS, the world-leading manufacturer of laser-sintering systems, will be demonstrating UAV parts and presenting background from technical experts on the use of laser-sintering as a competitive business strategy.

“UAV design and manufacture is the most dynamically growing and evolving sector of the aerospace industry, and it has its own demanding challenges,” says Udo Behrendt, Business Development Manager Aerospace at EOS. “The unique capabilities of our systems meet these challenges while eliminating some of the costs and manufacturing restrictions of traditional processes.”

Laser-sintering involves no tooling, and very little machining or fixturing, making it highly cost-effective and speedy for the low production runs of most UAVs. Re-designs of parts for changing missions and payloads, including mass customization for individual UAVs, are inexpensive as well. Because laser-sintering is an additive manufacturing technology, it can be used to create complex geometries that integrate multiple parts for weight savings, or that fit into the irregular space left in existing assemblies. Designs being laser-sintered for UAVs include fuel tanks, engine shrouds, control vanes, filter boxes, and air ducting, for example.

Available laser-sintered materials are well-suited for unmanned aircraft. EOS AlSi10Mg Aluminum can be used to create lighter-weight thin-walled parts. EOS NickelAlloy IN718 and IN625 provide high tensile strength, excellent processability and uniform corrosion resistance. In plastics, aside from various polyamide 11 and 12 materials, EOS also offers fire-retardant polyamide PA 2210 FR as well as PEEK HP3, the first high-performance thermoplastic polymer available for laser-sintering.

Still more materials options are available from EOS’ strategic partner Advanced Laser Materials (ALM). Between 60 and 70 percent of ALM’s business is creating one-of-a-kind plastics formulations in close cooperation with individual customers. “Just as laser-sintering promotes customized, design-driven manufacturing, we use our expertise with polymer bases and various additives to customize plastics,” says Donald Vanelli, president of ALM. “The customers know best what they want in terms of physical requirements, and we understand how to formulate a plastic to match their needs.” In addition to tailoring materials, ALM also has standardized offerings such as 640-GSL, an extremely lightweight glass- and fiber-reinforced plastic with an average density 15 percent less than nylon—and nylon has about the same density as water—and a high strength imparted by the fibers.

Andrew Snow, Regional Director, Sales, at EOS of North America, says, “The UAV industry has barely begun tapping the potential power of laser-sintering to create innovative, reliable parts. There’s no better proof of how our technology supports unmanned aircraft design and manufacture than the range of invention, in plastics and metals both, that our customers are displaying at this show.”

For more information, visit: http://symposium.auvsi.org/auvsi11/public/enter.aspx

Published in EOS

EOS, the world leading manufacturer of laser-sintering systems, in collaboration with EADS Innovation Works (IW), has started work on a study to understand the potential of the Direct Metal Laser-sintering (DMLS) process to generate savings in the use of energy and raw materials. This will help to develop a new range of manufacturing technologies that will integrate sustainability relevant aspects into products and product manufacturing.

By capitalizing on the benefits the DMLS process offers, including the net-shape technology benefits to generate weight-reduced structures, along with the low use of raw materials, DMLS technology has a huge potential to contribute to sustainable development in manufacturing.

A previous study conducted by EADS IW showed that although the use of energy during the manufacturing phase could not compare with conventional manufacturing processes, energy consumption during the use-phase of aircraft components dropped significantly. Indeed the DMLS technology unlocks structural optimization, leading to weight reduction of the components, and thus fuel and CO2 emissions reduction.

In parallel, EOS carried out a Product Carbon Footprint (PCF) calculation of one kilogram of sintered material.  The findings supported EADS IW’s research, as they showed that the greatest impact on reducing CO2 emissions and energy consumption was to be found during the use-phase of laser-sintered components. It further identified the most important drivers of energy consumption along the B2B value chain; particularly around the supply of raw materials and the use of cooling systems.  It was while comparing data that EADS IW and EOS agreed to carry out a collaborative environmental study.

Technologies applied to aerospace normally have to go through a nine steps process called TRL (Technology Readiness Level) before a technology goes through qualification. For each TRL review, the evolution in maturity of a technology is measured in terms of performance, engineering, manufacturing and operational readiness as well as value and risk and sustainability/environment. The latter is a new criterion linked to EADS Group’s eco-efficiency vision and a joint study focusing on this criterion made perfect sense.

Following on from the original study, EADS IW and EOS  will now complete a full Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) – covering energy consumption, material use, CO2 emissions and use of hazardous material – benchmarking an optimized design for use with EOS’ next generation platform EOSINT M 280 metal system. Results should show improvements on the sustainable performances not only on the component, but also on its manufacturing.

Adrian Keppler, Manager Strategy and Business Development at EOS stresses: “There is a consensus within society that companies have to address and to meet their responsibility for our environment and our natural resources. As such, sustainability is one of the pillars of the EOS strategy. Our technology can help to improve environmental performance at clients such as EADS IW through freedom of new designs and innovation, reduced energy and CO2 emissions. At the same time, DMLS enables lightweight design as well as a reduced material consumption and transportation emissions due to production on demand.”

Cyrille Peignot, Sustainability Engineer at EADS IW, adds: “We shape the future of aerospace as a company. But in order to meet our responsibilities we have to tackle the current challenges such as access and availability of resources, as well as aircraft emissions. EOS is one of our suppliers in the Additive Layer Manufacturing (ALM) arena and their technology allows us to identify internal saving potentials. Indeed when combined with topology optimization, ALM can deliver weight reduction and, consequently, reduced fuel consumption, but more importantly economise on use of raw materials, frequently a significant cost to manufacturers.  So far we have been able to redesign a part during the case study process that meets our objectives: the use of fewer resources during manufacturing while producing almost no waste, as well as a significant decrease of the energy bill. All these are key factors to improve sustainability on an aircraft’s performance and its manufacturing.”

The joint case study of EOS with EADS IW will be carried on throughout the rest of the year and further more detailed results will be made available towards the end of 2011.

Photos: Cyrille Peignot, Sustainability Engineer, EADS IW. and Adrian Keppler, Manager Strategy and Business Development, EOS.

For more information, visit: www.eos.info or www.eads.com

Published in EOS

OPM is very pleased to announce it has secured funding for the purchase of an EOSINT P 800 SLS machine for the production of the firm’s OsteoFab™ medical implants. The funding was provided by the Connecticut Innovations, Inc.’s BioScience Facilities Fund. Financing is in the form of special debt instrument. The equipment is part of a multi-million dollar project to produce medical implants through additive fabrication with the firm’s proprietary OXPEKK® products which have properties comparable to human bone. The facility will be certified to ISO 13485, ISO 9001 and AS9100 and be equipped with clean rooms and world-class design and inspection capabilities. The project is expected to be completed by September 2011.

“We are very pleased that CI has provided the funding via their BioScience Facilities Fund for this extremely important project. We have had a long, successful relationship with CI that has resulted in positive financial return on their previous investment and the growth of jobs and world class technologies in the state,” said Scott DeFelice, President of OPM. “We are exceedingly confident that this particular undertaking will further position our firm and the state on the leading edge of biomedical and manufacturing technologies.”

OPM currently sells its biomedical polymeric OXPEKK® products on a global basis with regulatory approvals from the FDA, KFDA, ANVISA, COFEPRIS, and several CE Marks. It has traditionally sold these products as raw materials. With the addition of the EOSINT P 800, however, it will now be able to provide value-added manufacturing in-house. The P 800 allows for direct digital additive manufacturing through selective laser sintering (SLS), which means nearly anything that can be designed can be built with the firm’s implantable polymer. This enhanced capability positions the firm to lead innovation in biomedical technologies and the polymer market. The initial focus of the firm’s efforts will be the production of custom cranial and maxillofacial implants which are anatomically identical implants derived directly from a CT scan or MRI.

For more information, visit: www.oxfordpm.com

A glimpse into the fast-approaching future of mass-customized medical devices is available at Booth #2307 during MD&M East (Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, New York City, June 7-9). There EOS, the world-leading manufacturer of laser-sintering equipment, is operating an EOSINT M 280, the company’s most advanced Direct Metal Laser-Sintering (DMLS) system yet, showing how this technology can create uniquely patient-matched products that promote comfort and improve treatment.

Because laser-sintering is an additive manufacturing process, it can easily build complex geometries such as those for dental prostheses, orthopedic implants, and personalized cutting and drilling guides that reduce surgical and patient recovery times. The technology can also make lightweight porous solids or rough surfaces that promote bone growth.  A number of biocompatible, sterilizable materials, including stainless steel, cobalt chrome, titanium, polyamides, and polyaryletherketone (PEEK) are available for laser-sintering. The EOS booth will feature a broad array of existing products and prototypes in plastics and metals.

“Medical manufacturers worldwide have already discovered the benefits of one-off, best-fit designs,” says Martin Bullemer, EOS Business Development Manager Medical. “Going forward, they are pursuing validation and certification for in vivo applications.” For example, EOS  participated recently in a European Union-funded project to develop patient-matched, porous, PEEK craniofacial implants that encourage osteointegration with very good results to further develop this application.

Bullemer and Dr. Siavash H. Mahdavi of WITHIN Technologies Ltd. are giving a joint presentation titled “e-Manufacturing with Laser-Sintering for the Medical Device Industry” at the Innovation Briefs booth, #767 (1:30-1:55 p.m. Tuesday, June 7).

Also at the booth are two companies that apply emerging technologies to enhance laser-sintering applications: WITHIN Technologies Ltd., whose FEA/CAD optimization software works with plastic and DMLS systems to create strong, lightweight parts, including innovative, load-bearing lattice structures; and BESTinCLASS, a Swiss company known for its high-precision micromachining.

EOS was founded in 1989 and is today the world-leading manufacturer of laser-sintering systems. Laser-sintering is the key technology for e-Manufacturing, the fast, flexible and cost-effective production of products, patterns and tools. The technology manufactures parts for every phase of the product life cycle, directly from electronic data. Laser-sintering accelerates product development and optimizes production processes. EOS completed its business year 2009/2010 with revenues of 64 million Euros (90.4 million US$). The company employs 300 people worldwide, 250 of them in Krailling near Munich, Germany.

For more information visit: www.eos.info

Published in EOS

Run by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Formula Student challenges teams of undergraduates from around the world to design and build a single-seat racing car and compete at Silverstone against more than 100 other teams. The University of Warwick has participated every year for the past decade and in 2010 achieved its best ever race position – 22nd – thanks in no small part to extensive use of additive manufacture (AM).

In this respect, laser sintering machine and powder producer, EOS, has played a major role in helping the university to move up the field. Several years ago, an EOSINT P 380 was purchased to produce optimised plastic components for the race cars in short time frames. Then last year, for the first time, EOS in its role as technical partner contributed further by manufacturing and supplying laser sintered metal components.

The university is also fortunate to have on site WMG (formerly Warwick Manufacturing Group), which owns the EOS plastic processing machine installed in its International Manufacturing Centre. The group, which amongst other functions supports undergraduate and postgraduate projects, has also invested over the years in other AM machines. They include stereolithography and fused deposition modelling as well as EOS' sand sintering technology for casting.

Principal Teaching Fellow, Dr Steve Maggs, said, "With the help of laser sintered components made from titanium alloy, Inconel and alumide, last year's team managed to reduce the weight of the race car (fully fuelled) to 192 kg, 22 kg lighter than the previous year's car.

"The major advantage with AM is that the weight of each component can be optimised and parts can be produced quickly, late in the build process.

"The technology is perfect for concurrent engineering, which is essential for our students as each project time scale is relatively short, from October through to the following July.

"If parts are made in a rush shortly before the car is due to race, it will almost certainly add unnecessary weight, but this is avoided by exploiting the flexibility of layer-by-layer manufacture.

"We hope to make more extensive use of AM in the coming years. With the help of new designs and materials, it should allow us to achieve our target race car weight of 150 kg."

Lighter components and improved handling

In last year's car, there were three main areas where AM lowered the weight of components compared with the 2009 model. First, titanium alloy and carbon fibre replaced hardened steel in the production of the half shafts driving the two front wheels. Second, Inconel was substituted for steel tubing when producing the exhaust header. Third, laser sintered alumide, an aluminium-filled polyamide 12 powder, was used instead of a casting or fabrication for the induction system.

Driveshafts

Looking in more detail at the half shafts, their production used to be a headache for the university team, as finalisation of their design always came late in the build.

They were previously turned from hardened steel bar of approximately 20 mm diameter and then had a circlip groove and splines machined at both ends to mesh with the constant velocity (CV) joints. Replacing them in the 2010 car were shafts comprising end pieces with integral spines made from laser sintered EOS Titanium Ti64 alloy. They secured two ends of a 30 mm diameter, filament-wound, carbon fibre tubular shaft supplied by Crompton Technology Group.

David Cooper, who along with 11 other students chose the university's Formula Student entry as his final year project, graduated last year in mechanical engineering. He took up the story:

"Changing from steel to titanium and carbon fibre cut the weight of each half shaft by 70 per cent, from 1.35 to 0.4 kg, which amounted to a saving equivalent to one per cent of the car's total weight.

"In addition, less energy is required to rotate the lighter shaft, allowing better use of the power generated by the 510 cc single cylinder engine (KTM 525).

"It was notable that true net shape manufacture of the end pieces by EOS using its laser sintering technology resulted in a spline that fitted better than the previous machined version, with less play in the CV joints."

He went on to say that the lead time for producing the shafts was two weeks but now that the process is established, they could be manufactured in a couple of days. This compares favourably with the six to eight weeks typically needed to machine the shafts from steel bar. The transmission was not only put through its paces at Silverstone last year but has also undergone well over 100 hours of road testing, without any loss of performance or other adverse effects.

Exhaust header

EOS Inconel 718 powder was laser sintered to produce the exhaust header, which is the first stage in the exhaust system and has to withstand high temperatures and vibration. Previously, the part was made by bending tubular steel sections on a mandrel and welding them together.

Whereas the latter construction was necessarily of fixed wall thickness, the Inconel header has a section thickness that varies from 0.5 to 5.0 mm thanks to the application of HyperWorks modelling, analysis and simulation software from Altair Engineering. It allowed the volume of material in the header to be reduced, cutting the weight 40 per cent while maintaining performance.

Mr Cooper continued, "This benefit was only the start, as AM led to other significant improvements to the design of the car.

"The flexibility of design meant that the whole exhaust system could be redesigned and made shorter, leading to a total weight reduction from 4 to 3 kg.

"We were also able to drop the exhaust, including the 2 kg silencer box, by 500 mm from the middle of the car to the bottom, lowering the centre of gravity and noticeably improving handling around the track.

"F1 teams often make their exhaust manifolds by machining two blocks of Inconel and welding the halves together. So the weight- and time-saving AM technique, which produces a fully dense, corrosion resistant component that is robust and able to withstand high temperatures, may well be of interest to mainstream motor racing."

Induction system – and other alumide parts

It is difficult to optimise the shape and length of the car's induction system early in a Formula Student project, so it is advantageous to leave finalising the design until the last minute. For the university's entry last year, the plenum chamber and inlet runners were produced quickly from alumide powder in WMG's EOSINT P 380.

Again, layer-by-layer manufacture from the CAD model gave design flexibility while the polyamide and aluminium mixture produced a stiff structure. Little post processing was needed and the component only needed porosity sealing and painting. Weight was cut to under 1 kg, significantly lighter than the cast and fabricated induction systems used in previous years.

Other components on the car, especially late-configurable items, were designed on the fly and made from alumide to reduce weight. They included boxes for the electrics, cable clips, dashboard panelling and the rear light brackets. Mr Cooper pointed out that smaller parts such as the clips were made inside the void of the plenum chamber to maximise use of the P 380's build volume.

Not only do the Formula Student judges assess each car's speed, manoeuvrability and endurance, but they also appraise cost, business potential and aesthetics. In the latter respect AM has a big contribution to make, as it does not matter how complex a part is – it will be just as easy to manufacture as a simple one – so the degree of design freedom is almost limitless. Similarly, it is immaterial if each clip, say, is slightly different from the next, as there is no penalty in manufacturing cost or time.

Described as a breeding ground for world class engineers, Formula Student's key aims are to inspire the next generation and address the skills shortage.  It achieves this by providing crucial practical experience and transferable skills that can be used in a diverse range of industries. AM is a core technology that is destined for growth across all sectors.

About EOS

EOS was founded in 1989 and is today the world's leading manufacturer of laser-sintering systems. Laser-sintering is the key technology for e-Manufacturing, the fast, flexible and cost effective production of products, patterns and tools. The technology manufactures parts for every phase of the product life cycle, directly from electronic data. Laser-sintering accelerates product development and optimises production processes. EOS completed its business year 2009/2010 with revenues of 64 million Euros. The company employs 300 people worldwide, 250 of them in Krailling near Munich, Germany. For more information visit: www.eos.info


About WMG

WMG, formerly known as Warwick Manufacturing Group, was founded by Professor Lord Bhattacharyya in 1980 in order to reinvigorate UK manufacturing.  Its mission is to improve the competitiveness of companies through the application of value adding innovation, new technologies and skills deployment, bringing academic rigour to industrial and organisational practice.

It is an international group with collaborative centres in the UK, China, India, Malaysia, Russia, Singapore and Thailand.  As an academic department of the University of Warwick, it occupies a unique position between academia and industry.  Its success over the past 30 years is the result of cutting edge research and effective knowledge transfer, working with global companies to develop innovative products and processes to real world problems.  The strength of its expertise spans three capability areas: digital technologies; materials and manufacturing plus operations and business management.

It is an international centre for world class management studies, offering unrivalled postgraduate and professional education programmes. Collaborating with over 500 UK companies, it has developed a focused programme based on real world scenarios that enables managers and leaders to succeed in a constantly changing global environment. For more information visit: www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/sci/wmg

Published in EOS

The first North American public unveiling of the new EOSINT M 280, EOS’ most advanced direct metal laser-sintering (DMLS) system, is at Booth #202 at the RAPID 2011 show (May 24-26, Minneapolis, Minnesota). Innovative process and control features of the M 280 complete the evolution of DMLS systems into full-fledged production tools for the economical, batch-size, optimized manufacture of parts at all stages from prototyping through finished product.

“Our newest system reflects a growing demand, led by precision-driven industries such as aerospace and medical manufacturing, for laser-sintering as a proven production method,” says Andy Snow, Regional Sales Director at EOS of North America. “The M 280 can build fully functional parts in a wide range of materials, with standardization and quality assurance capabilities on a par with those of traditional processes.”

The new DMLS equipment expands on the capabilities of the EOSINT M 270, currently the leading system on the market for additive layer manufacturing of metal components. Among the features of the M 280 of particular value for creating end-use parts are:

* Either a 200- or a 400-watt solid-state laser for targeted radiation and consistently accurate performance
* Laser Power Monitoring (LPM) to control the build process
* The ability to use either nitrogen or argon protective atmospheres. This allows the machine to manufacture in light metals, tooling steel, and super alloys that include titanium, aluminum, cobalt chrome, and Inconel.

Available options for controlled manufacturing, such as Part Property Profiles for standardized production and Integrated Process Chain Management modules, can be added to the M 280 at any time.

In addition to introducing a DMLS system that is focused on the needs of manufacturers, EOS is also exhibiting recently developed metal and plastic materials for specialized industrial uses:

-EOS NickelAlloy IN625.  Material properties such as high tensile strength, excellent processability and good corrosion resistance make this super alloy highly suited for use in aerospace, chemical, motor sport and marine industry applications.

-PrimePart FR (PA 2241 FR).  This material is flame-retardant and particularly suitable for aerospace. Based on PA 12 polyamide, it has an 11 percent elongation at break—significantly higher than its predecessor, PA 2210FR. It also has a lower refresh rate (ratio of new to re-used powder), offering cost savings and environmental benefits.

-PrimePart ST (PEBA).  This flexible elastomeric polyether block amide has unique customizable mechanical properties. Different laser-exposure strategies can be used to create either hard or soft components. PrimePart ST has an excellent refresh rate, making it an environmentally favorable alternative to other flexible materials for laser-sintering. With this plastic, previously impossible laser-sintered applications, such as flexible fasteners, seals or buffers, are possible.

EOS is highlighting two companies that apply emerging technologies to enhance laser-sintering applications: WITHIN Technologies Ltd., whose FEA/CAD optimization software works with plastic and DMLS systems to create strong, lightweight parts, including innovative, load-bearing lattice structures; and BESTinCLASS, a Swiss company known for its high-precision micromachining.

An EOS FORMIGA P 100 for plastics laser-sintering will be in operation at the company’s booth as well.

EOS will hold its EOS of North America User Day (EOS NAUD) on May 23, 2011, the day before the RAPID exposition begins and in the same location as the show.

EOS was founded in 1989 and is today the world-leading manufacturer of laser-sintering systems. Laser-sintering is the key technology for e-Manufacturing, the fast, flexible and cost-effective production of products, patterns and tools. The technology manufactures parts for every phase of the product life cycle, directly from electronic data. Laser-sintering accelerates product development and optimizes production processes. EOS completed its business year 2009/2010 with revenues of 64 million Euros (90.4 million US$). The company employs 300 people worldwide, 250 of them in Krailling near Munich, Germany.

For more information visit: www.eos.info

Published in EOS

Advanced Laser Materials (ALM)  announced today that it has entered into a strategic partnership with Integra Services. ALM, a developer and manufacturer of materials for rapid manufacturing, has been affiliated with EOS, the world leading manufacturer of laser-sintering systems, since 2009.  Under the agreement, ALM will act as a majority shareholder obtaining 51 percent of the Integra shares. This collaboration should offer immediate benefit to the laser sintering community in the US by offering a combination of excellent equipment service and materials application, support and development to users of all laser sintering platforms.

Johann Oberhofer, Chief Operating Officer of EOS emphasizes: “Two years ago we found a perfect partner in ALM. We anticipate that working with Integra will complement our existing capabilities: the provision of technology and support for customers who manufacture high quality parts – both in prototyping and manufacturing."

Donnie Vanelli, President of ALM, LLC adds: “The strategic partnership with EOS, has allowed both EOS and ALM to make a large step forward in the transition of laser-sintering from rapid prototyping to rapid manufacturing. ALM provides custom materials for the emerging rapid manufacturing area in partnership with EOS. The strategic partnership between Integra, ALM, and EOS will allow complete custom  digital manufacturing solutions for the industry, including integrated platforms, materials and services. The EOS Group will now have complete material and service packages for all Laser Sintering platforms in North America with a strong focus on materials development research and responsive service.

Lance Shanklin, President of Integra adds: “The collaboration with a strong partner like EOS will improve  our growth potential significantly for the future and open new opportunities to provide increased support to our customers.  Benefiting from EOS intellectual property portfolio, we can complement and expand our hardware, service, and material offerings."

For more information visit: www.alm-llc.com / www.integra-support.com / www.eos.info

At their booth in hall 4.1, booth F48, EOS, the leading supplier of laser-sintering systems, will be showcasing advanced e-Manufacturing solutions for dental models at this year’s International Dental Show (IDS) show taking place in Cologne/Germany March 22 till 26, 2011.

Dental models for the appropriate restoration of dental prostheses and for checking the occlusion have long been manufactured through time-consuming production and preparation of cast dental impressions. Currently, though, dental technology is undergoing a radical shift as well as a process of industrialization and automation for the manufacture of dental models.

Rise of new dental CAD/CAM applications enable digital manufacturing of dental models

The further development of dental CAD/CAM applications with new impression and intraoral scanners will make it possible to send high-quality data directly to the processing centre. The only thing missing would be a dental model for occlusion testing and post-processing, or a fixation device for use during veneering. Such a model can be laser-sintered on a FORMIGA P 100 from PA 2105, a top-quality plastic, on the basis of already available data. Consequently, laser-sintering provides a complete solution for the manufacture of dental prostheses.

It is already quite common for the patient’s oral situation to be assessed digitally by means of intraoral scanners or by means of model scanning. This affects important subsequent processing and production steps such as the production of dental restorations as well as dental models. This digital three dimensional data can be processed directly and without a moulding-induced loss in precision by means of metal laser-sintering, for example in order to produce dental crowns and bridges. A second set of data contains the digital description of the dental model, ready for polymer laser-sintering. Both of these forms of individualized series production are based on e-manufacturing via laser-sintering. Martin Bullemer, Business Development Manager Medical at EOS adds: “Laser-sintered dental models offer a whole range of advantages when compared to conventionally manufactured ones. The digital e-Manufacturing process ensures a high model precision for the precision of the prosthesis fit.”

Technological centrepiece of plastic dental e-Manufacturing: FORMIGA P 100

Polymer laser-sintering is an additive layer manufacturing method. To enable its use for manufacturing dental models, the three dimensional data is sliced into layers. Using these as a model, the system produces the model in layers by fusing plastic powder using a laser. The technological centrepiece of dental e-Manufacturing is the FORMIGA P 100 – the leading plastic laser-sintering system in the compact class. With an overall building volume of 200 mm x 250 mm x 330 mm the system can produce, for example in three stacked layers up to fifty single dental models within ten hours. Its economical and flexible design permits the system to be ideally integrated into dental lab workflows for a comparatively low investment cost. Operating this laser-sintering system requires personnel only for loading and unpacking the machine. As such, it is a very reliable process which at the same time helps to conserve resources through the reuse of powder not fused.

The laser-sintered dental model requires no manual finishing because no support structures are needed. At the same time it is a highly cost-efficient and time saving process due to the production of a hollow model and multilayer building. The FORMIGA P 100 produces a plastic model that is used both for checking prostheses quality, for veneering and production of dental prosthesis. Moreover, it is possible to generate models for analysis.

PA 2105: Coloured plastic material for series production

PA 2105 is a pigmented polyamide-12 powder for the manufacturing of laser-sintered dental models that are based on the colour of the plastics used in conventional manufacturing. The usual colour contrast with the dental prosthesis eases the veneering of the dental prostheses. At the same time, the high mechanical strength and thermal stability enable optimal fit control and veneering of the dental prostheses. The laser-sintered model can ensure abrasion resistance despite frequent prosthesis insertion and removal.

Bullemer concludes: “Thanks to this efficient production method – the dental model is ideally produced in parallel with the associated crown or bridge – the complete manufacturing process is shortened by an average of one working day.”

For more information visit: www.eos.info

Published in EOS

At this year’s LAB DAY Chicago (Feb. 25-26, Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers), EOS-Electro Optical Systems, the world-leading manufacturer of laser-sintering systems, is proud to present two clinics, titled “Producing Bridges, Copings, Implants and Models from CAD Data Via Laser-Sintering.” The sessions mark the first time at LAB DAY that EOS has presented clinics approved for 1.5 Scientific Certified Dental Technician (CDT) Credits. They will be held in Hospitality Suite 930 on Saturday, Feb. 26, from 8:30 a.m.-10 a.m. and again from 10:30 a.m.-noon.

The clinics will afford dental technicians the opportunity to learn about direct metal laser-sintering (DMLS) as a cost-saving, efficient alternative to traditional casting methods for copings, bridges, and implants. They will also explore plastics laser-sintering for modeling for, among other things, post-processing restorations. Thomas Thiel, Master Dental Technologist, will conduct the clinics.

Thiel, an EOS engineer, dental applications division, has previously worked in commercial laboratories specializing in crown and bridge, combined removable partial dentures, implants and ceramics. He has also worked as a trainer at Bremen-based BEGO, one of the leading dental companies worldwide, spearheading various dental clinics.

“Laser-sintering is gaining widespread acceptance as a manufacturing and modeling tool throughout the dental industry,” Thiel notes. “Our presentation of this accredited class is one more example of that, and will promote additional adoption by laboratories that wish to benefit from our mass customization and batch manufacturing capabilities.” In addition to biocompatible cobalt-chrome copings and bridges, EOS DMLS systems are used for titanium implants with controlled porous surfaces that promote osteointegration. These implants are currently CE-certified in Europe and are undergoing FDA approval in the USA.  

An additive manufacturing technology, laser-sintering uses CAD and other 3D digital data to build parts layer-by-layer. DMLS equipment can run unattended to produce about 450 individually designed bridges and crowns for porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) restorations in 24 hours. In contrast, with the traditional lost-wax casting process, a dental technician can only produce about 20.

EOS will also showcase samples of dental products at its exhibit during LAB DAY.

Published in EOS

At this year’s American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS) annual meeting, EOS, the world-leading manufacturer of laser-sintering systems, has a working direct metal laser-sintering system (DMLS) in operation at their booth (#2656) with a variety of plastic and metal medical devices on display. Parts exhibited include customized surgical drill guides reflecting patient-specific geometry, bone rasp samples, and prototype stainless steel surgical tools. The latest test results for customized PEEK implant manufacturing will be available. The show runs February 15-19 at the San Diego (California) Convention Center.

“Our offerings at the AAOS meeting demonstrate just how mature laser-sintering is now,” says Martin Bullemer, EOS manager for medical business development. “Metal and plastics laser-sintering have clearly become enabling technologies for medical products.” Bullemer will be available at the booth for interviews.

EOS plastic and metal laser-sintering systems allow medical designers to tailor parts specifically for doctors and patients using 3D data generated by MRI, CT, and/or CAD. Modern data preparation software in combination with laser-sintering can be used to create complex geometries, porous surfaces suitable for better osteointegration or lightweight structures to promote better patient comfort.

Other EOS-related activities at the AAOS meeting include:

* Morris Technologies Inc., exhibiting in Booth #2655 across the aisle from EOS, announced that, in collaboration with Kapstone Medical, they will soon file with the FDA for 510(k) pre-market notification for the first DMLS-generated titanium implant.

Says Chuck Hansford, Morris vice president of the medical business unit, “We are in the final mechanical and biocompatible testing stages with a Ti 64 ELI implant made with material from EOS. We hope to submit our application before the end of the first quarter of this year.” For more information, go to www.morristech.com

* WITHIN Technologies Ltd will be visiting the show. Their FEA/CAD optimization software works in tandem with plastic and metal laser-sintering systems, such as those from EOS, to create strong, lightweight parts including innovative lattice structures.

“Additive manufacturing provides the design freedom to create components you can’t produce any other way,” says WITHIN’s Dr. Sia H. Mahdavi. “Much as CAD systems have manufacturability aids developed specifically for processes such as injection molding and casting, our software identifies the optimum solution to each design challenge and helps manufacturers maximize what laser-sintering machines do best.”  To learn more, go to www.within-lab.com

About EOS

EOS was founded in 1989 and is today the world-leading manufacturer of laser-sintering systems. Laser-sintering is the key technology for e-Manufacturing, the fast, flexible and cost-effective production of products, patterns and tools. The technology manufactures parts for every phase of the product life cycle, directly from electronic data. Laser-sintering accelerates product development and optimizes production processes. EOS completed its business year 2009/2010 with revenues of 64 million Euros. The company employs 300 people worldwide, 250 of them in Krailling near Munich, Germany. For more information visit www.eos.info

Published in EOS

The first PEEK craniofacial test implants to be produced with laser-sintering will be presented by EOS, the world-leading manufacturer of laser-sintering systems, at the co-located Pacific Design & Manufacturing/MD&M West shows at the Anaheim, California Convention Center, February 8-10, 2011.

EOS’ Collaborative Projects Coordinator, Joerg Lenz, will deliver a previously unpublished technical paper on the results of a European Union-funded project called Custom-IMD (www.customimd.eu) on plastic implants, titled “Laser Sintering of PEEK,” during afternoon Session 303 on Wednesday, February 9th.  The test implants were fabricated in Germany using the EOSINT P 800 system (the first laser-sintering system worldwide operating at up to 385 degrees C for processing high-performance polymers). The implants will be on display at EOS booth #3600 after Lenz’s presentation.

High-temperature, biocompatible PEEK (Polyaryletherketone) material is increasingly being used as an alternative to titanium for craniofacial implants (produced from CT-scan geometry) for patients with head injuries or congenital deformities. Lenz’s paper documents the first validated in vivo

Conventional manufacturing technology can’t produce patient-customized craniofacial implants, either titanium or PEEK, as economically or in as short a time span as laser-sintering,” says Lenz. “What’s more, EOS technology has enabled us to develop a specific geometry that can only be realized using additive manufacturing. This new design incorporates a mesh scaffold that promotes improved bone growth and optimizes infiltration with a hydroxyapatite-filled, bio-absorbable polymer.”  The implants displayed at the EOS booth will include one filled with the polymer.

Lenz serves on a number of international standardization organizations, including ASTM Committee F42 on additive manufacturing technologies. PEEK-implant animal studies continue through the EU-funded project, and human trials are planned for the future. The current implant was designed by a team at AZM (the University Hospital Maastricht, The Netherlands) headed by Dr. Jules Poukens. A patent for the network of holes in the unique mesh scaffold has been applied for.

Scott Killian of Royal Engineered Composites, the first American user of the P 800, will also be at the EOS booth to discuss his company’s use of the machine and show sample geometries of PEEK medical and aerospace parts. There will be a working FORMIGA P 100 laser-sintering system at the booth as well as metal parts produced with direct metal laser-sintering (DMLS).  Lenz and Killian are both available for interviews.

About EOS

EOS was founded in 1989 and is today the world-leading manufacturer of laser-sintering systems. Laser-sintering is the key technology for e-Manufacturing, the fast, flexible and cost-effective production of products, patterns and tools. The technology manufactures parts for every phase of the product life cycle, directly from electronic data. Laser-sintering accelerates product development and optimizes production processes. EOS completed its business year 2009/2010 with revenues of 64 million Euros. The company employs 300 people worldwide, 250 of them in Krailling near Munich, Germany. For more information visit www.eos.info

Published in EOS

This year’s Wohlers Report on the state of the additive manufacturing (AM) industry includes a striking statistic: When global service providers were asked which technology they would most likely add, the most popular response was laser-sintering from EOS, followed by PolyJet from Objet and FDM from Stratasys, according to (see chart below).

For 15 years, Wohlers Associates has compiled an annual comprehensive report on the advances in additive manufacturing technologies and applications. The 2010 report includes field information that provides an extensive overview of the current state of the industry. “We sent our survey to 150 service providers from around the world,” said Terry Wohlers, principal consultant and president of Wohlers Associates. “One of the questions we asked was, ‘If you were going to add a new AM technology, which one would you most likely acquire?’ We gave them 21 systems to choose from, plus an “Other” option. Sixty-four organizations from 18 countries—responded, and the data revealed that 40.4 percent of those chose laser-sintering from EOS over everything else.”

Chuck Alexander, Director of Additive Manufacturing at Solid Concepts (Valencia, CA), suggests several possible reasons for the survey results. “We’ve seen firsthand the accuracy, reliability and minimal downtime of EOS laser-sintering systems,” he says. “The company’s wide range of plastic and metal materials may also appeal to service bureaus looking to expand what they offer customers.”

About Wohlers Associates

Wohlers Associates, Inc. is a 24-year old independent consulting firm in Fort Collins, Colorado. The company provides technical and strategic consulting on the new developments and trends in rapid product development and additive manufacturing. Much of this guidance deals with industrial applications, hidden costs, what works and what does not, industry trends, and growth forecasts. The company also assists with acquisitions, partnerships, product positioning, competitive issues, investment, and whether to enter a particular market segment. The company's past work has involved more than 160 client organizations in 22 countries around the world.

About EOS

EOS was founded in 1989 and is today the world-leading manufacturer of laser-sintering systems. Laser-sintering is the key technology for e-Manufacturing, the fast, flexible and cost-effective production of products, patterns and tools. The technology manufactures parts for every phase of the product life cycle, directly from electronic data. Laser-sintering accelerates product development and optimizes production processes. EOS completed its business year 2009/2010 with revenues of 64 million Euros. The company employs 300 people worldwide, 250 of them in Krailling near Munich, Germany. For more information visit www.eos.info

Contact
EOS GmbH Electro Optical Systems
Claudia Jordan
Group Manager Marketing Communications
Phone: +49 89 893 36 134
Fax: +49 89 893 36 284
e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Published in EOS

EOS, the world leading manufacturer of laser-sintering systems, once again presents its e-Manufacturing solutions at EuroMold in Frankfurt. EOS showcases the range of its portfolio with two operating systems at the booth - an EOSINT P 395 for plastic laser-sintering and the unveiling of the enhanced Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) solution, the EOSINT M 280. In addition, EOS introduces a series of new plastic and metal materials, which confirms, once more, the quality leadership role of EOS. Based on the materials, completely new fields of application can be developed, costs can be reduced and customer requirements can be served in an ideal way.

Peter Klink, Executive Vice President Global Sales at EOS, adds: "Very often, the development of new materials is based on a close dialogue with our customers. These developments help to solve their challenges in production while reducing production costs. In addition, these new materials open up completely new fields of application." For example, at EuroMold, EOS introduces a new metal material to the market, EOS NickelAlloy IN625.  For plastic, EOS debuts two new materials: PrimePart FR (PA 2241 FR) and PrimePart ST (PEBA 2301).

Versatile metal material: EOS NickelAlloy IN625

The new material EOS NickelAlloy IN625 is very versatile. Its ideal material properties, such as its high tensile strength, its excellent processability and its eminent and uniform corrosion resistance, make it ideally suited for use in aerospace, chemical, motor sport and marine industry applications.

In fact, first applications show promising results: Greg Morris, CEO of Morris Technologies, notes: “We are using IN625 with DMLS to build complex aerospace parts for high-temperature and high-strength applications. The process achieves material properties that are comparable to wrought metals and far exceed casting.  For prototyping projects, DMLS saves our customers weeks and often thousands of dollars compared with traditional methodologies.”

Flame-retardant material: PrimePart FR (PA 2241 FR)

PrimePart FR (PA 2241 FR) is a new, flame-retardant material that is particularly suitable for applications in the aerospace industry. This material, based on PA 12 polyamide, has an 11 percent elongation at break, which is significantly higher than its predecessor material PA 2210FR. Also, due to its better refresh rate, PrimePart FR offers increased economic and ecological benefits.

Flexible with unique material properties: PrimePart ST (PEBA 2301)

PrimePart ST is a flexible elastomeric material, offering a wide-range of mechanical properties depending on the laser-exposure strategy selected. Via the process control, the material can be converted into a hard- or a soft-type component. The material has an excellent refresh rate making it a valid ecological alternative compared to conventional flexible materials for laser-sintering. Due to its resilience, PrimePart ST opens up new fields of application, such as flexible fasteners, seals or buffers.

Part Property Management (PPM): Standards for e-Manufacturing

EuroMold 2010 marks the one year anniversary of the successful launch of the EOS Part Property Management (PPM). The PPM offers major advantages for e-Manufacturing by providing standards to ensure reliable and repeatable quality in laser-sintering. At any time, the designer has access to standardized property profiles and corresponding material properties and, therefore, the user-based decision-making and production processes become more efficient and transparent.  As a result, builds are more easily repeatable.

Based on increasingly automated data processing and a more flexible production planning in manufacturing, the PPM results in an increased efficiency and reduced costs, at the same time allowing for optimized and transparent quality assurance processes. As such, laser-sintering becomes a competitive and cost-effective manufacturing method for plastic and metal parts. The PPM is further evolving, resulting in the possibility of integrating customer-specific process parameters into the concept in the future.

About EOS

EOS was founded in 1989 and is today the world leading manufacturer of laser-sintering systems. Laser-sintering is the key technology for e-Manufacturing, the fast, flexible and cost effective production of products, patterns and tools. The technology manufactures parts for every phase of the product life cycle, directly from electronic data. Laser-sintering accelerates product development and optimizes production processes. EOS completed its business year 2009/2010 with revenues of 64 million Euros. The company employs 300 people worldwide, 250 of them in Krailling near Munich, Germany. For more information visit www.eos.info.

Pictures (under “Press Material”) and further information (under “Press Releases”) you find under http://www.eos.info/en/news-events.html

Contact
EOS Electro Optical Systems GmbH
Claudia Jordan
Group Manager Marketing Communications
Phone: +49 89 893 36 134
Fax: +49 89 893 36 284
e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Published in EOS

EOS, world leading manufacturer of laser-sinter systems, will be showcasing its solution portfolio again at this year’s EuroMold (December 1 - 4, 2010) in hall 11, booth C08. With the EOSINT M 280, EOS this year launches a further improved version of its market leading additive manufacturing systems for metals. Peter Klink, Executive Vice President Global Sales at EOS, states: „The new system sets new standards in terms of part quality and reproducibility, at the same time improving cost-effectiveness and user-friendliness. The EOSINT M 280 adopts all features and advantages of the well-established EOSINT M 270 system, and makes it even more attractive for a wide range of demanding applications including tooling and series production.“

EOS pioneered direct additive manufacturing of metals in 1995 with the introduction of the EOSINT M 250 system. Since then EOS has continuously updated and further developed this product line. The EOSINT M 270 is in the meantime by far the best-selling metal additive manufacturing system and has gained a strong reputation for producing best quality parts. To date EOS has sold about 270 metal systems. Numerous users are already using the EOSINT M 270 for series production in a variety of fields, including medical products and tooling. Many other users are actively qualifying the technology for their production. Based on feedback from many of these customers as well as its own innovative ideas, EOS has now further significantly developed the technology with its EOSINT M 280.

400 Watt laser for increased build speed and productivity

The new system EOSINT M 280 is available with either the same 200 Watt fibre laser which was pioneered by EOS with the EOSINT M 270, or with a 400 Watt fibre laser option. This higher power laser can melt more metal powder per second, thus achieving shorter build times and higher system productivity. For example, an injection moulding core will be displayed at EuroMold which was built in less than half the time compared to EOSINT M 270.

Especially for heavy use in a manufacturing environment, this enables significantly reduced costs-per-part, thereby increasing the competitiveness of laser-sintering compared to other technologies and opening up new viable application areas.

Increased build height expands applications range

Another improvement of the EOSINT M 280 compared to its predecessor is the increase of the maximum building height up to 325 mm. This enables taller parts to be placed in the process chamber, again expanding the application areas. This is particularly interesting for hybrid part building, a concept which EOS introduced in the 1990s for prototype tooling. In the hybrid process, complex parts are produced by building additional material on top of a prefabricated part.

Optimized gas management: robust process for increased reproducibility

Based on extensive process investigations and supported by fluid dynamics simulations, EOS has optimized the gas management system of the EOSINT M 280. A high-velocity laminar flow of protective gas across the entire build area, combined with the high-capacity recirculating filter system, ensures even more uniform process conditions. As a result, stable melting behaviour is ensured even over long periods of time and with higher laser power. This results in further improved reproducibility of the part properties. The system therefore offers an excellent platform for further material and process developments. It also supports processes both under nitrogen gas atmosphere, created by compressed air via an integrated nitrogen generator, as well as under argon gas. Moreover, further improvements in the gas management system enable a reduction of the gas consumption and a prolonged filter lifetime, which further improve the cost-effectiveness and user-friendliness of the system.

Part Property Management based on thorough process development

Based on intensive process and application developments, EOS has established high standards in recent years. The new EOSINT M 280 builds on the Part Property Management concept, which was introduced at last year’s EuroMold and emphasizes the quality leadership of EOS. It enables a standardisation und comparability of building processes, based on the so-called Part Property Profiles (PPP). By ensuring a consistent quality assurance along the entire process chain, EOS enables machine users to reliably produce parts based on defined material and part properties.

The EOSINT M 280 supports all the materials of its predecessor, with the same or with optimized parameter sets. Currently, EOS offers ten series materials, including the most recent material EOS NickelAlloy IN625. For the 400 Watt option new, faster parameter sets with corresponding Part Property Profiles will be introduced. Customers can either use the pre-qualified EOS parameter sets or develop and modify their own.

Further system improvements

As with previous models, the system configuration can be adapted to different customer needs through a variety of options and accessories. The so-called Laser Power Monitoring (LPM) monitors the laser power during the building process and reports the compliance with the specifications or warns of any deviations. With the base module of the EOSTATE 1.2 software the machine status can be monitored. Additional EOSTATE modules Quality Assurance, Controlling and MPM (Machine Park Management) are also available. They allow a statistical overview of the built jobs and parts over freely selectable periods of time. Integrated Process Chain Management (IPCM) modules offer optimized powder and part handling, thus ensuring an increased productivity, quality and usability. These can be added at any time. In addition, EOS plans to introduce an optional glove box to enable the parts to be freed from powder inside a closed process chamber environment.

About EOS

EOS was founded in 1989 and is today the world leading manufacturer of laser-sintering systems. Laser-sintering is the key technology for e-Manufacturing, the fast, flexible and cost effective production of products, patterns and tools. The technology manufactures parts for every phase of the product life cycle, directly from electronic data. Laser-sintering accelerates product development and optimizes production processes. EOS completed its business year 2009/2010 with revenues of 64 million Euros. The company employs 300 people worldwide, 250 of them in Krailling near Munich, Germany. For more information visit www.eos.info.

Published in EOS

EOS, the world leading manufacturer of laser-sintering systems, once again presents its e-Manufacturing solutions at EuroMold in Frankfurt. EOS illustrates the range of its portfolio with metal and plastic laser-sintering systems operating in the new hall 11, booth C08. With the introduction of a further improved system and new metal materials, the company is responding to the requirements of the market by providing solutions that increase productivity and improve efficiency and process quality, especially in the field of series production where the market demands quality- and cost-effective solutions.

“At EuroMold, EOS’ introduction of an enhanced system for Direct Metal Laser-Sintering (DMLS) sets new standards in terms of part quality and repeatability, while providing a higher cost efficiency and improved usability,” says Peter Klink, Executive Vice President Global Sales at EOS.

"At the same time, the debut of new EOS materials further expands our quality leadership function. Very often, the development of these materials is based on a dialogue with our customers. Together we can solve their challenges in production. In addition, tthese new materials open up completely new fields of application,” adds Klink.

For metal materials, EOS presents EOS NickelAlloy IN625. Inconel 625 is particularly used in the aerospace industry. EOS also introduces two new plastic materials: Prime Part FR (PA 2241 FR) - a new, non-flammable material, especially for the aerospace industry - and PrimePart ST (PEBA 2301) – a flexible plastic, that, due to its special material properties, creates unlimited applications.

Additionally, EOS Part Property Profiles (PPP) for standardized and comparable quality of e-Manufacturing in the plastics sector is successfully used in production since last year’s announcement at EuroMold 2009. Now, in 2010, the first PPPs are available for the metal sector. In addition, EOS will further develop the appropriate concept of Part Property Management (PPM).

We kindly invite you to the EOS press conference on Dec. 1, 2010 at 14.00 h on the EOS boothwww.eos.info/interview. If you wish to arrange an interview with EOS at EuroMold 2010 please arrange an appointment in advance with Claudia Jordan (see contact details below).

About EOS

EOS was founded in 1989 and is today the world leading manufacturer of laser-sintering systems. Laser-sintering is the key technology for e-Manufacturing, the fast, flexible and cost effective production of products, patterns and tools. The technology manufactures parts for every phase of the product life cycle, directly from electronic data. Laser-sintering accelerates product development and optimizes production processes. EOS completed its business year 2008/2009 with revenues of approximately 60 million Euros. The company employs 300 people worldwide, 250 of them in Krailling near Munich, Germany. For more information visit www.eos.info.

Contact:
EOS Electro Optical Systems GmbH
Claudia Jordan
Group Manager Marketing Communications
Phone: +49 89 893 36 134
Fax: +49 89 893 36 284
e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Published in EOS
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