Arcam has received an order for two EBM systems from CalRAM in the US. The systems will be used for production of aerospace components.

CalRAM, a Midstate Berkshire Company, is a customer to Arcam since 2005 and presently operates 5 EBM systems. Midstate Berkshire is a recognized leader in precision machining, fabrication and assembly for the aerospace, defence and oil and gas industries.

"With demand for additive manufacturing production increasing rapidly, we continue to invest in EBM technology to secure capacity and give CalRAM an edge in the aerospace industry,” says Duane Pekar, CEO of Midstate Berkshire. “Arcam is the leading supplier of titanium additive manufacturing systems and we turned to them with confidence, having used their EBM products for years.”

"Arcam’s strategy is to offer Additive Manufacturing solutions specifically targeting production volumes in the aerospace and orthopaedic industries. This deal confirms the potential for our EBM technology within the aerospace industry. We look forward to continue working closely with CalRAM to further grow their activities in this innovative, demanding industry,” says Magnus René, CEO of Arcam.

For more information, visit: www.calraminc.com

Published in Arcam

Arcam AB announced that a new hip system from Beijing AK Medical is now formally approved by the Chinese State Food and Drug Administration. This is China's first CFDA marketing approval for an additively manufactured orthopedic implant.

Beijing AK Medical, a Chinese orthopedics implant industry leader, and Professor Zhongjun Liu and Professor Ke Zhang of Peking University Third Hospital have been working closely together on this project. After six years of product design, biological tests, biomechanics and clinical validations, and regulatory approval processes, the 3D ACT hip system has finally received marketing authorization.

“We are very happy that our customer Beijing AK Medical received this first ever CFDA approval for an Additively Manufactured implant in China. This confirms how our EBM technology is leading the way in additive manufacturing of implants”,
says Magnus René, CEO of Arcam.

“With this CFDA approval in place we look forward to a continued strong growth in the Chinese market”, says Jane Chen, General Manager of Arcam (Beijing) Industrial Equipment Ltd.

For more information, visit: www.arcam.com

Published in Arcam

Arcam AB (STO:ARCM), listed on NASDAQ Stockholm, and leading supplier of Additive Manufacturing solutions, is expanding in the US through a new facility for sales and service in Woburn, MA, just outside Boston. Arcam Cad to Metal Inc. is headed by recently appointed President Saeed Pirooz.

Arcam has been present in the US since 2003 and Arcam Cad to Metal Inc. was founded already in 2005. The new office in Woburn, MA will cover the needs of Arcam’s rapidly growing EBM business in North America. The EBM technology, due to its high productivity, sees increased adoption by clients moving to large scale manufacturing. Significant clients in the aerospace industry include Pratt & Whitney, General Electric, CalRam and in the medical industry Medical Modeling.

As the worlds’ largest market for the Aerospace and Implant industries the US market is very important for Arcam. The new 5500 sqf facility in Woburn will provide sales, support, spare parts and consumables and house an application and training center to serve clients in North America.

”We are enthusiastic about this important step in strengthening our presence in the US and we welcome Saeed as part of our global EBM team. Saeed has a solid background in leading positions in technology industry”, says Magnus René, CEO of Arcam.

“With the infrastructure and a talented team, we are well positioned to support our customers locally and I look forward to continued growth of our business in North America”, says Saeed Pirooz, President of Arcam Cad to Metal Inc.

Arcam Group provides Additive Manufacturing solutions for production of metal components. Arcam’s Electron Beam Melting (EBM®) technology offers design freedom combined with excellent material properties and high productivity. Arcam is, through its solution orientation and comprehensive product offering, an innovative partner for advanced manufacturing, primarily for the aerospace and medical industries. Arcam offers EBM systems through Arcam AB in Sweden, powder metals through AP&C in Canada and implant contract manufacturing through DiSanto in the U.S. The company is listed on Nasdaq Stockholm and the Head Office is located in Mölndal, Sweden.

For more information, visit: www.arcam.com

Published in Arcam

Sciaky, Inc., a subsidiary of Phillips Service Industries, Inc. (PSI) and provider of metal 3D printing solutions, announced that it has entered into a structured reseller agreement with EFESTO, LLC that includes the sale of Sciaky’s Electron Beam Additive Manufacturing (EBAM) systems and services to targeted countries and named accounts. Under terms of the agreement, EFESTO will provide exclusive sales representation and resale of Sciaky’s EBAM solutions to Australia, Brazil, China, India, Japan, Nigeria, Poland, Russia and South Korea, along with named accounts in the Middle East and the U.S. oil & gas sector.

EFESTO is a rapidly growing advanced technology enterprise, committed to engineering an industrial revolution in the field of 3D printing of metals and metal composites. It has deep knowledge and experience in Directed Energy Deposition (DED) technologies and their industrial applications, and an extensive track record of marketing premium ‘best-in-class’ metal 3D printing equipment around the globe. EFESTO is also establishing premium service bureaus that will utilize the largest and fastest metal 3D printers available.

“This relationship with Sciaky has compelling synergies, providing EFESTO a remarkable technology and product line to bring to its global customers, as well as the opportunity to utilize in its own service bureaus,” said Ashok Varma, CEO & Chairman of EFESTO, LLC.

“Sciaky is proud to bring EFESTO aboard for key countries and accounts around the world,” said Mike Riesen, general manager of Sciaky, Inc. “Sciaky’s EBAM process is the fastest, most scalable metal 3D printing process in the world.”

Sciaky also provides industry-leading electron beam and advanced arc welding systems, as well as affordable job shop welding services, for the aerospace, defense, automotive, and other manufacturing industries.

For more information, visit: www.sciaky.com or www.efesto.us

Published in Sciaky

The German company joimax®, developer of technologies and training methods for minimally invasive endoscopic spinal surgery, announced it received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to market its Endoscopic Lumbar Interbody Fusion, or EndoLIF® On-Cage implant.

The EndoLIF On-Cage consists of titanium alloy, produced with Electron Beam Melt (EBM) technology. The cage displays a porous surface with diamond cell structure, providing an optimal base for cell proliferation and bone growth. Two large openings, which may be filled with autogenous bone, support the creation of a straight column for fusion.

The EndoLIF implant allows surgeons to utilize an inter-muscular approach, similar to a mini transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF), into the intervertebral disc, enabling endoscopic-assisted fusion. Dr. Ralf Wagner, LIGAMENTA Spine Center, Frankfurt and Dr. Bernd Illerhaus, ONZ, Datteln/Recklinghausen, two German spine specialists, have already performed more than 200 out of 600 EndoLIF procedures in Europe. “The access is dura and nerve-gentle, preserves the dorsal bony structures and we can avoid scar tissue because of the stepwise tissue dilation,” said Dr. Illerhaus.

The EndoLIF On-Cage is designed to be used with supplemental posterior fixation, such as the joimax Percusys® percutaneous pedicle screw-rod system. Cage implantation can be performed with a posterior or postero-lateral approach, either using an open or endoscopic-assisted method.

“With the EndoLIF program, joimax offers a complete endoscopic-assisted solution for spinal stabilization and fusion. In the future, we will be able to treat patients with even more gentle techniques,” comments Wolfgang Ries, CEO and founder of joimax. “Our next development will be an EndoLIF Cage on the basis of our iLESSYS Delta system for posterior lumbar inter-body fusion (PLIF).”

Founded in Karlsruhe, Germany, in 2001, joimax is one of the leading medical device companies in minimally invasive spinal surgery (“joined minimal access”). The company’s U.S. subsidiary was established in Irvine, California, in 2005. The company is primarily focused on the development, production and marketing of technologies and methods for minimally invasive endoscopic spinal surgery. joimax is active in 40 countries around the globe and its methods have been successfully employed in approximately 150,000 surgeries. With a special focus on education, the company provides surgeons with specialized technique training through the three-step joimax CM3 education program. This program includes visitations, cadaver workshops and live-surgery support.

For more information, visit: www.joimax.com

Published in Joimax

Addaero Manufacturing announces the formation of a new firm that is aimed at becoming the preeminent supplier of 3D Additive parts for the aerospace industry. The core promise of the company is based upon delivering “additive parts by aerospace people” that combines intimate aerospace knowledge with additive manufacturing prowess. Two of the principals involved in the start-up of the firm, Rich Merlino and Dave Hill, have extensive experience in aerospace segments, both having worked with Pratt & Whitney in various engineering, operations and supply-side roles.

“The aerospace industry is increasingly looking to utilize additive parts in R&D projects and eventually in production. Very few additive manufacturing companies have the deep level of understanding about what is involved in aerospace matched with additive manufacturing expertise. With Addaero you get both,” stated Rich Merlino, President.

The additive manufacturing approach that Addaero delivers is based solely upon solving customer challenges with solutions that work and support their additive parts requirements. Addaero currently features Arcam EBM (Electron Beam Melting) as one of their key approaches to additive parts manufacturing, while also being flexible to other technologies such as DMLS. Cedar Terrazas, V.P. Engineering, has nearly a decade of experience working with Arcam EBM technology.

“By always exploring many different additive manufacturing methods we’re continually investigating new ways to combine the right technology to the application. Being flexible and knowing the aerospace segment provides us the opportunity to align the technology and manufacturing solution that’s right for each and every application,” remarked David Hill, V.P. Operations.

Addaero offers the aerospace industry a multitude of solutions from rapid development of parts from CAD drawings that save months of time bringing designs to life that weren’t possible with traditional machining approaches. All designed to help reduce the time to market - the critical element that parts manufacturers play in the aerospace world.

Addaero is centrally located in New Britain, Connecticut with close proximity to many large aerospace companies.

For more information, visit: www.addaero-mfg.com

Published in Addaero

GKN Aerospace has entered a strategic partnership with additive manufacturing specialist, Arcam AB, to develop and industrialise one of the most promising of the new ‘additive’ processes to meet the needs of the expanding future aerospace market.

The joint technology development (JTD) partnership is focused on developing electron beam melting (EBM), a process in which metal components are built up, layer-by-layer, using a metal powder that is melted by a powerful electron beam. EBM is able to produce very precise, complex, small to medium-sized components that require very little finishing.

As part of this agreement, GKN Aerospace has ordered two ARCAM Q20 EBM machines to be installed at GKN Aerospace’s Bristol, UK additive manufacturing (AM) centre. GKN Aerospace and ARCAM engineers will then work together to create the next generation of EBM equipment, able to manufacture complex titanium structures at the high volumes required to meet future demand.

Russ Dunn, Senior Vice President Engineering & Technology, GKN Aerospace explains: “We have been working with Arcam for some time exploring what we believe to be one of the most promising of the additive processes. Our aim has been to fully understand how EBM can be applied to our future aerostructures and aero engines portfolio. Through this new strategic partnership with ARCAM our combined additive manufacturing teams will now take the next steps towards fully industrialising this AM technology.”

He adds: “We believe the array of processes that fall under the ‘additive’ umbrella will revolutionise manufacturing across every industrial sector - particularly in aerospace where cost, weight and performance are critical.  Drawing on GKN Powder Metallurgy’s experience and our own extensive aerospace expertise we aim to develop a roadmap that will industrialise additive manufacturing for this sector.”

Magnus René, CEO, Arcam comments:  “We are now very happy to announce this order and important partnership with GKN Aerospace.  We are convinced that the close collaboration with GKN Aerospace will be key for further industrialization of our EBM technology in the aerospace industry”

The agreement forms part of the GKN group’s major AM research and development initiative.  Within the GKN Aerospace business, four dedicated global AM development centres have been established in North America and Europe each clearly focused on progressing specific additive processes and technologies.

Additive processes have huge potential for the future aerospace sector where there is a growing demand for more, and more efficient, aircraft.  In the coming years the industry  will need to  manufacture at greater speeds and with total consistency - producing components that are lighter and more cost-effective, and that generate less waste during manufacture and lower emissions in operation.

For more information, visit: www.gkn.com

Published in GKN Aerospace

CSIRO, St Vincent's Hospital and Victorian biotech company Anatomics have joined together to carry out world-first surgery to implant a titanium-printed heel bone into a Melbourne man.

Printed using CSIRO's state-of-the-art Arcam 3D printer, the heel bone was implanted into 71-year-old Len Chandler, a builder from Rutherglen Victoria, who was facing amputation of the leg below the knee following a diagnosis of cancer of the calcaneus, or heel bone.

St Vincent's Hospital surgeon Professor Peter Choong was aware of CSIRO's work in titanium 3D after reading about our work producing an orthotic horseshoe in 2013, and contacted CSIRO's John Barnes in early June about his vision for a metallic implant which would support the body's weight.

At the time, CSIRO happened to be working with the Victorian-based biotech company Anatomics on metallic implant technology and CSIRO brought Anatomics into the discussion with Professor Choong to draw on their experience as a certified custom medical device manufacturer.

Working from Anatomics' schematics for the calcaneus heel bone, teams at Anatomics and CSIRO developed the design requirements with Professor Choong's surgical team.

Included in the design were smooth surfaces where the bone contacts other bone, holes for suture locations and rough surfaces to allow tissue adhesion. Anatomics and CSIRO produced three implant prototypes in the days before the surgery.

In the space of two weeks, from first phone call to surgery, CSIRO and Anatomics were able to custom-design and present an implant part to the St Vincent's surgical team, in time for the surgery on the second week of July.

Mr Chandler returned to St Vincent's Hospital this week for a check-up and said he was recovering well, and able to place some weight on his implant.

"The customisation of 3D printing is good in emergency situations such as these," a member of CSIRO's titanium printing team Dr Robert Wilson said.

"Custom designed implants mean job opportunities in this area as these types of surgeries become more commonplace."

CSIRO is working with a number of major companies and SMEs across Australia to build capacity in biotech and manufacturing.

"3D printing is a local manufacturing process, meaning Australian companies produce implants for our own patients for our own doctors to use," CSIRO's Director of High Performance Metal Industries John Barnes said.

"We would no longer have to rely on imported parts that slow the process down and is less personal for the patient.

"At some point in the future we expect that local for-profit businesses will have the capacity to work on projects like this, and meanwhile the CSIRO is here to help local industry grow and build momentum."

For more information, visit: www.csiro.au/Organisation-Structure/Flagships/Future-Manufacturing-Flagship/Ti-Technologies.aspx

Published in CSIRO

Researchers at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have demonstrated an additive manufacturing method to control the structure and properties of metal components with precision unmatched by conventional manufacturing processes.

Ryan Dehoff, staff scientist and metal additive manufacturing lead at the Department of Energy’s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at ORNL, presented the research this week in an invited presentation at the Materials Science & Technology 2014 conference in Pittsburgh.

“We can now control local material properties, which will change the future of how we engineer metallic components,” Dehoff said. “This new manufacturing method takes us from reactive design to proactive design. It will help us make parts that are stronger, lighter and function better for more energy-efficient transportation and energy production applications such as cars and wind turbines.”

The researchers demonstrated the method using an ARCAM electron beam melting system (EBM), in which successive layers of a metal powder are fused together by an electron beam into a three-dimensional product. By manipulating the process to precisely manage the solidification on a microscopic scale, the researchers demonstrated 3-dimensional control of the microstructure, or crystallographic texture, of a nickel-based part during formation.

Crystallographic texture plays an important role in determining a material’s physical and mechanical properties.  Applications from microelectronics to high-temperature jet engine components rely on tailoring of crystallographic texture to achieve desired performance characteristics.

“We’re using well established metallurgical phenomena, but we’ve never been able to control the processes well enough to take advantage of them at this scale and at this level of detail,” said Suresh Babu, the University of Tennessee-ORNL Governor's Chair for Advanced Manufacturing. “As a result of our work, designers can now specify location specific crystal structure orientations in a part.”

Other contributors to the research are ORNL’s Mike Kirka and Hassina Bilheux, University of California Berkeley’s Anton Tremsin, and Texas A&M University’s William Sames.

The research was supported by the Advanced Manufacturing Office in DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy's Office of Science. DOE's Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time.

For more information, visit: www.ornl.gov/user-facilities/mdf

Published in ORNL

Arcam launched a process for Inconel 718® as a qualified material for use in Arcam’s EBM systems. The Inconel process is initially available for the Arcam A2X platform. The machine material parameters and mechanical testing was done in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Parts made in the new process are exhibited at the Rapid conference in Detroit, MI, June 10-12.

“With the introduction of the Inconel 718 our customers in the aerospace industry can now further expand the range of components that they produce in their EBM machines”, says Magnus René, CEO of Arcam.

The material properties comply with chemical requirements of UNS N07718 and properties of ASTM F3055-14 specification.

INCONEL® is a registered trademark of Special Metals Corporation.

Arcam provides a cost-efficient Additive Manufacturing solution for production of metal components. The technology offers freedom in design combined with excellent material properties and high productivity. Arcam’s market is global with customers mainly in the orthopedic and aerospace industries. The company was founded in 1997 and is listed on NASDAQ OMX Stockholm, Sweden. Head office and production facilities are located in Mölndal, Sweden. Support offices are located in the US, UK, Italy and China.

For more information, visit: www.arcam.com

Published in Arcam

CSIRO scientists are using 3D printing to build a new generation of hi-tech fish tags made of titanium. The aim is to use the tags to track big fish such as marlin, tuna, swordfish, trevally and sharks for longer periods.

CSIRO is printing the tags at its Lab 22 facility in Melbourne. The tags are printed overnight and then shipped to Tasmania where marine scientists are trialing them.

Tags are made of titanium for several reasons: the metal is strong, resists the salty corrosiveness of the marine environment, and is biocompatible (non-toxic to living tissues).

One of the advantages of 3D printing is that it enables rapid manufacture of multiple design variations which can then be tested simultaneously. "Using our Arcam 3D printing machine, we've been able to re-design and make a series of modified tags within a week," says John Barnes, who leads CSIRO's research in titanium technologies.

CSIRO's 3D printing facility prints metal items layer by layer out of fused metal powder.  Had the scientists been using conventional tags which are machined out of metal blocks, it would have taken a couple of months to design, manufacture and receive the new designs for testing.

"Our early trials showed that the textured surface worked well in improving retention of the tag, but we need to fine-tune the design of the tag tip to make sure that it pierces the fish skin as easily as possible," says John.

"The fast turnaround speeds up the design process – it's very easy to incorporate amendments to designs. 3D printing enables very fast testing of new product designs, which why it's so attractive to manufacturers wanting to trial new products."

Scientists from a number of agencies, including CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research, use fish tags to track movements of individual marine species and increase understanding of their behavior. Tracks of selected marine animals tagged by CSIRO and partner agencies can be viewed on the CSIRO Ocean Tracks website.

Medical implants such as dental implants and hip joints are made of biocompatible titanium with a surface texturing which speeds healing and tissue attachment after implantation. Scientists hope that a similar rough surface will help the tag to stay in fish longer.

"A streamlined tag that easily penetrates the fish's skin, but has improved longevity because it integrates with muscle and cartilage, would be of great interest to our colleagues conducting tagging programs across the world," said CSIRO marine researcher, Russell Bradford.

CSIRO's Lab 22 3D printing facility was established in October 2012 and has been used to manufacture a range of prototype products including biomedical implants, automotive, chemical processing and aerospace parts.

For more information, visit: www.csiro.au/TitaniumTechnologies

Published in CSIRO

The facility houses the first Arcam additive manufacturing machine, which uses electron beam melting to fuse metal powders into complex shapes layer by layer, in the southern hemisphere. The system creates three-dimensional parts from metals including titanium alloys, nickel and hard steel alloys.

CSIRO's expertise in titanium manufacturing includes electron beam melting, coldspray and thermally assisted machining. The new facility is part of CSIRO's Future Manufacturing Flagship.

"Additive manufacturing is an emerging technology capable of changing the future of manufacturing in Australia and we are keen to facilitate the adoption of new technologies which will benefit Australian businesses," Director of CSIRO's Future Manufacturing Flagship Swee Mak said.

"We have invested in a suite of technologies and research, which combined with our links with RMIT and Monash University, provide industry a unique opportunity to explore and engage in forward-thinking design and production techniques."

CSIRO has identified additive manufacturing as a key opportunity for the manufacturing sector in Australia and has expertise in core supporting technologies, including materials science, polymer science and metal fabrication.

Industrial commercial additive manufacturing activities CSIRO is engaged in include the development of titanium pipe with Future Titanium Technologies and the production of aerospace hardware through the Joint Strike Fighter program with Ferra Engineering.

"Additive manufacturing has been used for rapid manufacture of prototypes where its speed of production is advantageous. It can also be used for manufacture of complex, high-value components for industrial applications, and is especially useful for short production," titanium research leader in the Future Manufacturing Flagship John Barnes said.

"Companies that want to take on additive manufacturing face a number of practical challenges. We've been providing technical advice to solve problems and helping businesses to access these technologies for nearly ten years now."

The titanium research facility will be showcased to industry at an ‘open house' event on December 5 at CSIRO's Clayton site.

For more information, visit: www.csiro.au

Published in CSIRO

Lockheed Martin Aeronautics and Sciaky, Inc. will celebrate their partnership in a Department of Defense Mentor-Protégé Program agreement on Thursday, April 12, 2012, at 9 a.m. Local government officials and Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Vice Presidents Steve O’Bryan and Tom Simmons will participate.

Highlights will include media availability and photo opportunities, including two Electron Beam Direct Manufacturing (EBDM) machines currently used for testing and Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) projects. “B-roll” footage of Sciaky’s EBDM process and of the Lockheed Martin F-35 will be available.

Sciaky, Inc. currently employs about 55 employees. As Sciaky’s EBDM technology matures, Lockheed Martin will consider it for the F-35 fighter program and other projects.

Media coverage is welcome – please arrive at the plant by 8:45 a.m. on Thursday.

Location:  4915 West 67th Street, Chicago, IL 60638

For more information, visit: www.sciaky.com

Published in Sciaky

Morris Technologies, Inc. (MTI) has purchased an Arcam A2 electron beam melting (EBM) machine. MTI is the global leader in additive-metal manufacturing, and this acquisition enhances their arsenal of product offerings by making the EBM technology available to their customers in aerospace, medical, and other industries.

The Arcam A2 builds functional metal parts layer by layer using metal powder.  The powder is melted by a powerful electron beam to the exact geometry dictated by a 3D CAD model. Parts are built in vacuum at elevated temperatures resulting in stress-relieved parts with material properties better than cast and comparable to wrought material.

The acquisition of the EBM additive manufacturing machine will offer advantages to MTI's customers. "The Arcam A2 is a complementary technology to our existing DMLS additive manufacturing machines and will allow us to offer additional capabilities and solutions for our customers," says Greg Morris, CEO of Morris Technologies.  "Coupled with our extensive, world-class machining and finishing technologies, we believe that we can offer cost and time savings for a number of customer geometries and projects."

The Arcam machine will be installed at MTI's facility and ready for manufacturing in January 2012.  Initially, Morris Technologies will be focusing on building geometries from titanium (Ti 64). They plan ongoing testing of other alloy powders and will introduce other options as appropriate.

Based in Cincinnati, Ohio, Morris Technologies, Inc. (MTI) has been on the cutting edge of manufacturing technologies since 1994.   MTI's heavy investment in research and development has enabled them to evolve into the global leader in additive-metal manufacturing processes and advance technologies by offering new materials and developing new hardware.  MTI also specializes in end-to-end product development, from engineering to prototyping to low-volume manufacturing.

For more information, visit: www.morristech.com

Published in Morris Technologies

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