Stratasys

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Tuesday, 17 October 2017 16:23

2018 Extreme Redesign 3D Printing Challenge

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Stratasys announced the company is officially kicking off its 2018 Extreme Redesign 3D Printing Challenge with a “call-for-entries.” Entering its 14th year, the contest is widely recognized as the premier event to highlight excellence in 3D printed design from student innovators.

Leveraging the power of 3D printing, students around the world now have the opportunity to redesign an existing product, create a new product that improves how tasks are accomplished, or design an original work of art or architecture. This year’s contest is fully supported by the GrabCAD community – the world’s largest online collaborative environment supporting designers, engineers and manufacturers.

“Since its inception, the Stratasys Extreme Redesign 3D Printing Challenge has awarded more than $150,000 in scholarships to some of the world’s top student innovators. We’re proud to continue this tradition, offering new entrants the opportunity to learn, innovate, and grow leveraging 3D printing technology,” said Gina Scala, Director of Marketing, Global Education, Stratasys. “We greatly look forward to seeing what this year’s group of entries can design and innovate.”

As part of entry criteria, all designs should prove mechanically sound, realistic, and achievable. Submissions are analyzed and judged based on:

  • Sound mechanical design
  • Compelling written description
  • Design creativity
  • Product usefulness
  • Aesthetics (art, jewelry and architecture category)


Both individuals and design teams are asked to create entries leveraging 3D CAD software, submitting files in .STL format through the GrabCAD Platform – along with a written description highlighting the design’s value and benefits. Deadline to submit across the following categories is NO LATER than February 26, 2018:

  • Engineering: Secondary Education (middle/high school)
  • Engineering: Post-Secondary (university, college, or post-secondary)
  • Art, Jewelry, or Architecture (any grade level)


First-place winners of this year’s contest will receive $2,500 (US Dollars) scholarships. Instructors of first-place students will also benefit from a demo Stratasys 3D printer in their classroom for a limited time. Second-place winners will receive $1,000 (US Dollars) scholarships. The top 10 entries in each category earn a Stratasys apparel item (value up to $50 US Dollars), and a 3D printed model of their design. All teams and individuals additionally receive official Stratasys, GrabCAD, and Extreme Redesign Tech Tattoo stickers.

For the third year running, the National Coalition of Advanced Technology Centers (NCATC) is also bestowing a $1,000 scholarship to an entry in the post-secondary engineering category who is also from a NCATC member school. NCATC is a network of higher education resources promoting use of technology applications to enhance economic and workforce development programs and services.

Stratasys announced that its multi-material, multi-color PolyJet 3D printing technology has enabled Ben Ryan, founder of Ambionics, to create a fully-functioning 3D printed hydraulic prosthetic for his two year old son, Sol.

Researching infant development with prosthetics, Ben Ryan has developed a unique prosthetic for infants to wear, enabling a more natural acceptance of prosthetic arms for young children. An unparalleled innovation within this sphere of the medical field, the customized design and production of the 3D printed hydraulic prosthetic has delivered cost savings of up to 76%, as well as time savings in design and production of 90%, compared to traditional methods of manufacture. This crucially permits prosthetics to be used at an earlier developmental stage.

When Ben’s son, Sol, was born in March 2015, complications resulted in the amputation of his lower left arm. Although able to keep approximately one inch of his lower arm, Sol would have to wait three years for a myoelectric prosthetic from the NHS*, and one year before a cosmetic, non-functional prosthesis would be fitted. Ben saw his son losing responsiveness and acceptance of his left arm, and decided to act.

Having undertaken extensive research into infant development, Ben saw that higher rejection rates occur when children are fit after the age of two years and that early fitting of functional devices correlates with continued prosthetic use throughout childhood. Another study also found that children fitted before two years of age tend to accept their powered prosthesis more than those fitted after two years. With this in mind, Ben first designed a foam arm for his son, and later a hydraulic prosthetic, enabling Sol to move his thumb on his own.

Ben designed and created his 3D printed hydraulic prosthetic arm on the Stratasys Connex 3D Printer. First practicing with prototypes of his design, Ben 3D printed flexible actuators and a power-splitting unit (double acting helical bellow or DAHB) for the prosthetic. According to Ben, the DAHB unit enables the wearer to open and close the thumb in manual mode or with assistive power (using compressed air or a hydraulic pump and reservoir), but the grip continues to operate manually in the event of power interruption.

“The success of my patented DAHB mechanism draws on the advanced capabilities of the Stratasys Connex Printer – the ability to combine rigid and soft materials in a single print was vital to the success of the design,” explains Ben. “We were fortunate enough to have access to this technology, which enabled us to 3D print a prototype arm so quickly and cost-effectively. In founding Ambionics, it’s now my goal to ensure that other limb deficient children like my son are not faced with the current constraints and delays of traditional prosthetic manufacture.”

“This is a very innovative and ambitious project and it’s been inspiring to work with Ben on it,” says Paul Sohi, a product design expert at Autodesk. “It is amazing that despite Ben having no real background in product design, he’s effectively taught himself enough to create something that will not only help his own son Sol, but in Ambionics, potentially others facing the same challenges too.”

As well as its lightweight 3D printed design that weighs less than traditional myoelectric alternatives, the hydraulic prosthetic is body-powered and enables infants to grow accustomed to their “arm” earlier than traditional fittings. The ability to operate without the need for any electronic devices or batteries is unique to the Ambionics design and mitigates the risk of injury.

While the NHS takes 11 weeks to convert the plaster cast of the arm into a wearable prosthetic, Ben Ryan was able to produce the prosthetic in only five days. With the flexibility to keep the scan on file, the digital copy allows replacement prosthetics to be easily produced through 3D printing.

“Essentially the entire prosthetic is 3D printed,” Ben adds. “Only Stratasys’ strong rubber-like and dissolvable support 3D printing materials make production and use of the DAHB units possible. The internal cavities are complex and it would be impossible to remove the support material using mechanical means. The materials must also be strong yet flexible as they are used to transmit fluid pressure to operate the grip.”

Having patented its DAHB technology inside the prosthetic, Ambionics is aiming to offer the service to healthcare providers worldwide. Continuing its research and testing into infant development with prosthetics, the company is starting a Crowdfunding campaign on March 1st to enable medical device usability trials, which are required before seeking authorization to launch the product into the market.

“This case is indicative of 3D printing’s ability to improve lives by overcoming the traditional barriers of low-volume manufacturing,” says Scott Rader, General Manager, Healthcare Solutions, Stratasys. “We continue to support and enable innovators like Ben to bring customization to mainstream prosthetics manufacture,” he concludes.

Stratasys announced the appointment of Lilach Payorski, currently Stratasys’ Senior Vice President of Corporate Finance, to Chief Financial Officer, effective January 1, 2017, succeeding Erez Simha in this role. Following 5 years of service, Mr. Simha, CFO & COO of Stratasys, has recently informed the Company of his desire to step down as of year-end. Mr. Simha will remain with the Company to provide operational and financial support to Management as required.

Payorski joined Stratasys in December 2012. Bringing over 20 years of finance experience, Payorksi has served in various finance leadership roles over the past 10 years, in positions at PMC Sierra, CheckPoint Software Technologies and Wind River Systems. Earlier in her career, she served as a CPA with Ernst & Young LLP both in Israel and later in Palo Alto, CA. Payorski holds a B.A. in Accounting and Economics from Tel Aviv University.

“I am very pleased that we have a strong internal successor in Lilach Payorski” said Ilan Levin, Chief Executive Officer of Stratasys. “As SVP of Corporate Finance, she has proven to be a key leader within Stratasys and has the full confidence of me and the board of directors in assuming the role of CFO. I am confident in the finance organization’s ability to smoothly manage through this leadership transition.”

“During his 5 year tenure, Erez has made very significant contributions to the company, first in his role as chief financial officer and then broadening his role to include operations as well,” added Levin. “During that time, he has built a strong infrastructure in both finance and operations, and helped the company evolve its capital structure and capital allocation approach to support our objectives. I thank him for his years of service to the company.”

SAP and Stratasys announced that SAP is establishing along with Stratasys, a global network of 3D printing co-innovation labs to educate and enable customers, employees and partners on the adoption of additive manufacturing as an integral part of the manufacturing production line. Unveiled in conjunction with charter co-innovation partner Stratasys, this initiative builds on SAP’s more than 40 years of experience across the industry. Digital manufacturing and co-innovation sites are currently being rolled out across Paris, France; Johannesburg, South Africa; Walldorf, Germany; and Newtown Square, Pennsylvania, and Palo Alto, California, in the United States.

“SAP and Stratasys share a common vision of the tremendous value distributed manufacturing brings to customers’ supply chains,” said Pat Carey, senior vice president, Sales, North America, Stratasys. “Harnessing this potential fully requires that 3D printing be seamlessly integrated with enterprise workflows for certification, planning, procurement and production. By participating in this initiative, it’s now possible to combine SAP’s leadership in these areas with our premier 3D printing solutions and services ecosystem. We look forward to further driving 3D printing adoption with these co-innovation customers.”

The SAP® Distributed Manufacturing application is intended to make 3D printing a valuable part of digital manufacturing by helping co-innovation customers and partners to transform the extended supply chain. Services related to SAP Distributed Manufacturing connect 3D printing to familiar business processes to help manufacturers achieve production and logistical cost savings and reduce complex supply chain issues. The new 3D printing co-innovation facilities offered by SAP will provide an interactive learning and design thinking environment. It enables SAP customers, partners and employees to further develop and test active business cases and applications of the latest distributed manufacturing technology.

“Manufacturers and their suppliers and production partners increasingly recognize the potential of 3D printing in smart digital supply chain strategies that are optimized with unprecedented speed and efficiency,” said Hans Thalbauer, senior vice president, Extended Supply Chain and IoT, SAP. “SAP is fast building a co-innovation network with leaders like Stratasys that share our vision for making connected, real-time distributed manufacturing a reality for our customers.”

Stratasys has announced that the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) has acquired the much-acclaimed ‘Gemini’ chaise designed by Prof. Neri Oxman for its permanent collection. The purchase of Gemini, designed in collaboration with Professor W. Craig Carter with the 3D printed skin by Stratasys, is the most recent in a series of 3D printed art accessions by prestigious museums across the USA and Europe, which also include MoMA New York, Centre Pompidou Paris, Science Museum London, Museum of Fine Arts Boston and MAK Vienna.

Gemini is a semi-enclosed, stimulation-free environment designed to enhance vocal vibrations, which are thought to be healing, throughout the body. A biologically-inspired 3D printed skin lines the beautiful wooden chassis. The skin’s texture is an intricate design of tiny knobs, which provide comfort while maximizing sound absorption. The combination of a CNC milled wooden shell and the 3D printed lining creates an ideal acoustic setting for a single individual.

As the first project unveiled using Stratasys’ unique Connex3 triple-jetting technology, the 3D printed ‘skin’ that lines Gemini was created in myriad colors and materials. Combining three base materials – Stratasys’ rubber-like TangoPlus, rigid VeroYellow and VeroMagenta – the acoustic chaise included 44 different materials properties in varying shades of yellows and oranges with differing transparencies and rigidities, all produced simultaneously in a single 3D print. Surfaces that are more curved than others were assigned more elastic properties, thereby increasing sound absorption. The materials, shapes and surfaces of the 3D printed ‘skin’ enable a unique vibrational acoustic effect for a quiet, calming environment.

“No other manufacturing technology is able to provide such a variety of material properties in a single process. This makes Stratasys color, multi-material 3D printing technology very compelling for artists,” says Naomi Kaempfer, Creative Director Art Fashion Design at Stratasys. “And that’s just one influencing factor in the recent growth we are seeing in museums advocating 3D printed artwork. We believe that the technology has substantial cultural impact and expect it to have a significant influence on buying habits and manufacturing industries. As museums strive for public engagement with art, this progressive technology provides an important cultural reference, which should be celebrated.”

According to Kaempfer, the trend for museums adopting 3D printed design affirms the longevity of 3D printing as an artistic medium and reflects a wider movement of artists celebrating the unique capabilities made possible with this technology.

“3D printing is at the very cusp of innovation, and Stratasys leads the way with new developments of its technology and a wealth of diverse materials. As such it provides an expression of novelty and a source of wonderment for many artists,” Kaempfer concludes.

Stratasys announced it has tapped Dell, Inc. veteran John Gould as the newest member of the company’s leadership team. With more than 20 years of global management and technology experience, Gould will serve as president of North American operations.

With experience as an executive leader at computing giant Dell, Gould has deep operational expertise and a strong track record of success with go-to-market strategy and global sales leadership.

“Stratasys has helped define the market for 3D printing and next generation manufacturing,” said Stratasys Chief Business Officer, Josh Claman. “With a strong market position across North America and worldwide, Stratasys is committed to investing in key people to continue its growth and leadership position. I’m excited to bring John Gould on board, and I’m confident he will lead our North American team to the next level of growth.”

As president of North American operations and a crucial member of the executive leadership team, he is charged with defining the company’s North American strategy to expand the business, maintain Stratasys’ thought leadership position, and continue to improve both the customer and channel partner experience.

“As a defining force in 3D printing solutions, Stratasys is in the unique position to capture additional market opportunities throughout North America,” said Gould. I’m very excited about the opportunity that lies ahead for our customers, resellers and Stratasys, and I am confident Stratasys can continue to build significant momentum across the region.”

Gould comes to Stratasys from online marketing and advertising solutions provider ReachLocal, Inc. where he acted as chief revenue officer and general manager of North America. With full P&L responsibility, Gould also had functional ownership for all sales channels: inside, outside, national accounts and partner channels. 

At Dell, Inc., Gould served as executive director and general manager for the company’s IT Consulting Division for both the Americas and EMEA regions. He delivered multi-year, double-digit revenue growth for the division (over $400 million in total revenue) while increasing the division’s operating income.  The industry veteran also has senior sales and marketing leadership experience from market leaders: ADP, Compaq Computer Corporation and The Mathworks. Gould has a bachelor’s degree in economics from Connecticut College and an MBA in general management and marketing from Vanderbilt University – Owen Graduate School of Management.

For more information, visit: www.stratasys.com/corporate/investor-relations/management-team

Stratasys introduced a new soluble support material called SUP706 for PolyJet triple-jetting 3D printers. The new support material significantly reduces the time and manpower required to clean 3D printed models, enabling companies to efficiently scale-up to high volume production.

SUP706 automates post-processing of 3D printed parts with a simple two-step, soak-and-rinse process, giving users the ability to maximize productivity while achieving a low cost-per-part. High-production environments including service bureaus and internal prototyping shops will experience a faster and easier support material removal process.

“The development of SUP706 provides a great combination of advantages for 3D printing users,” said David Tulipman, director of product management for PolyJet consumables at Stratasys. “Owners of PolyJet-based 3D printers can now print small, intricate features with greater reassurance, and clean several parts at once, enabling high volume 3D printing that’s both cost-effective and hassle-free.”

SUP706 is available as a software update on all Stratasys PolyJet Triple-Jetting 3D Printers (Objet260 1/2/3; Objet350/500 1/2/3; Objet260/500 Dental Selection) and is compatible with all PolyJet materials, excluding hearing aid material.

For more information, visit: www.stratasys.com

Stratasys announced that it has teamed with Aurora Flight Sciences to deliver, what is believed to be, the largest, fastest, and most complex 3D printed unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) ever produced. Unveiled for the first time at the Dubai Airshow, the high-speed aircraft is built using lightweight Stratasys materials to achieve speeds in excess of 150mph. 

To realize the joint goal to design and develop an advanced 3D printed demonstration aircraft, the final UAV – which has a 3m (9ft.) wingspan and weighs only 15kg (33lb.) – leveraged 3D printing for 80 percent of its design and manufacture and is built on the expertise of Aurora Flight Sciences’ aerospace and Stratasys’ additive manufacturing.

According to Dan Campbell, Aerospace Research Engineer at Aurora Flight Sciences, the project achieved various targets. “A primary goal for us was to show the aerospace industry just how quickly you can go from designing to building to flying a 3D printed jet-powered aircraft. To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest, fastest, and most complex 3D printed UAV ever produced.”

“This is a perfect demonstration of the unique capabilities that additive manufacturing can bring to aerospace,” says Scott Sevcik, Aerospace & Defense Senior Business Development Manager, Vertical Solutions at Stratasys. “This meant using different 3D printing materials and technologies together on one aircraft to maximize the benefits of additive manufacturing and 3D print both lightweight and capable structural components.”

For Aurora, Stratasys’ additive manufacturing solutions provided the design-optimization to produce a stiff, lightweight structure without the common restrictions of traditional manufacturing methods. This also enabled the cost-effective development of a customized – or mission-specific vehicle – without the cost constraints of low-volume production.

“Stratasys 3D printing technology easily supports rapid design iterations that led to a dramatically shortened timeline from the initial concept to the first successful flight,” adds Campbell. “Overall, the technology saw us cut the design and build time of the aircraft by 50 percent.”

According to Sevcik, the project exemplifies the power of Stratasys’ flagship Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) 3D printing technology.

“Aurora’s UAV is a clear evidence of FDM’s ability to build a completely enclosed, hollow structure which, unlike other manufacturing methods, allows large – yet less dense – objects to be produced,” he explains.

“In addition to leveraging FDM materials for all large and structural elements, we utilized the diverse production capability of Stratasys Direct Manufacturing to produce components better suited to other technologies.  We elected to laser sinter the nylon fuel tank, and our thrust vectoring exhaust nozzle was 3D printed in metal to withstand the extreme heat at the engine nozzle,” Sevcik adds.

“Because Stratasys is able to produce parts that meet the flame, smoke, and toxicity requirements set by the FAA, ULTEM™ has become the 3D printing material of choice for many of our aerospace customers for final production applications,” he continues.

For Sevcik, this particular collaborative project with Aurora achieves one of the foremost overall goals among aerospace manufacturers, as well as those in other industries, which is the need to constantly reduce weight.

“Whether by air, water or on land, lightweight vehicles use less fuel. This enables companies to lower operational costs, as well as reduce environmental impact. In addition, using only the exact material needed for production is expected to reduce acquisition cost by eliminating waste and reducing scrap and recycling costs,” he concludes.

Stratasys will be presenting the role of additive manufacturing as one of the key technologies that will enable the ‘Factory of the Future’ at the annual Oracle OpenWorld conference, October 25 – 29, San Francisco.

Rich Garrity, VP & GM Vertical Solutions, Stratasys, will be a featured speaker at Oracle OpenWorld, discussing additive manufacturing’s role in the ”Factory of the Future” to deliver on the promise of a smart, agile manufacturing workflow. Rich will describe additive manufacturing integration scenarios with adjacent manufacturing software systems and also present specific customer manufacturing stories from strategic industries including aerospace and automotive.

“The inclusion of Industry 4.0 applications at Oracle OpenWorld, this year, make it a natural fit for Stratasys additive manufacturing,” said Danny Weber, VP Strategy and Strategic Alliances, Stratasys. “We invite attendees to come discuss how they can begin integrating additive manufacturing into their supply chain to improve production economics and explore new business models.”

Conference attendees will have the opportunity to experience additive manufacturing first hand at the event as Stratasys will be showcasing its 3D printing solutions, including the Fortus 450mc and uPrint SE Plus 3D printers, as well as its Stratasys Direct Manufacturing parts-on-demand service.

For more information, visit: www.oracle.com/openworld/index.html

Stratasys Ltd. announced that its color, multi-material technology is being successfully deployed to aid cancer surgeons in treating patients. Physicians use the models during pre-surgery planning of complicated kidney tumor removal, helping to perform precise and successful kidney-sparing surgery and improving patient outcomes. The 3D printed models are also used to improve surgeon training, as well as enhancing the explanatory process towards patients.

The advanced surgical process, which utilizes transparent and color 3D printed models produced on Stratasys' color, multi-material 3D Printer, the Objet500 Connex3 , is being pioneered by the Department of Urology and Kidney Transplantation at the University Hospital (CHU) de Bordeaux, in France. According to CHU surgeon Dr Jean-Christophe Bernhard, this is currently the only hospital in France - and one of the first in the world - to deploy Stratasys' multi-color, multi-material 3D printing technology for complex kidney tumor removal cases.

"Having a 3D printed model comprising the patient's kidney tumor, main arteries and vessels - each in a different color - provides an accurate picture of what we will see during operations," says Dr Bernhard.

"Importantly, the ability to visualize the specific location of a tumor in relation to these other elements, all in three dimensions, greatly facilitates our task and is not something that is easily achievable from a 2D scan," he adds.

According to Dr Bernhard, the clearer view offered by the 3D printed model may increase the ability to perform precise and successful kidney-sparing surgery. The pre-surgery planning aids in identifying and avoiding damage to the delicate nearby arteries and vessels which can result in complete kidney removal. Sparing the patient's kidney is important because it reduces the chance of subsequently suffering from chronic kidney disease.

"3D printing technology has effectively heralded a new dawn," continues Dr Bernhard. "A scan gives us good information, but it's in 2D. This relies on the surgeon to mentally reconstruct the tumor volume in 3D and estimate its location inside of the total volume of the kidney. The same process has to be done to clearly understand the relations between the tumor, the vessels (arteries and veins) and the collecting system. As you can imagine, this is difficult and time-consuming for the surgeon.

"Conversely, having a 3D printed kidney model in your hands that corresponds specifically to that of the patient you're going to operate on quite literally offers me a view from a new perspective. The only thing more accurate than that is the patient himself," he adds.

The CHU de Bordeaux uses three Stratasys PolyJet materials: transparent VeroClear to show the volume mass of the kidney itself, red for the arteries and yellow for the excretory tract. The red and yellow is then mixed on-the-fly - unique to Stratasys multi-material capabilities - to produce the all-important orange color of the tumor.

"The Stratasys transparent material is of fundamental importance as it allows us to see inside and estimate the depth at which the tumor resides," explains Dr Bernhard. "It enables us to see the arteries and the cavities that collect urine, so we can see if any of the arteries are touching the tumor. We need to remove the tumor, but not at the expense of the other vital elements that together enable the kidney to do its job. Finding that balance is much easier to achieve thanks to 3D printing."

Dr Bernhard also believes that use of 3D printed models will not be restricted to kidney surgery, and sees them being equally useful for any organ sparing surgeries.

Stratasys 3D printing solutions also significantly strengthens the CHU's capabilities from an instructional standpoint. For Dr Bernhard, this is a fundamental benefit of 3D printing and one that he sees making a big impact within the medical sector long-term.

"I think this technology will be a big driver in terms of shaping the future of teaching and surgical training," he says. "Having access to a 3D printed model that is completely accurate to the one that you're going to operate, not only enables you to train yourself on the operation, but it also greatly improves our ability to more accurately convey surgical procedures to students - who of course are the surgeons of tomorrow."

Another major benefit for the CHU of Bordeaux and Dr Bernhard is the ability to use the 3D printed models to more easily explain procedures to patients prior to surgery, thereby offering increased reassurance.

"Describing kidney tumor removal with 2D scan or a diagram will invariably leave most patients somewhat bewildered," he explains. "Presenting them with a 3D printed model that clearly shows the tumor puts them at ease and enables the patient to grasp exactly what we're going to do. Indeed, research from patient questionnaires shows that having 3D printed models increases their understanding of the surgery by more than 50%, so it's a considerable benefit in terms of overall patient care."

Commenting on the use of 3D printing technology at the hospital, Scott Rader, General Manager of Medical Solutions at Stratasys, says, "By putting exactly what the surgeon needs to see right in his hands, the pioneering use of Stratasys color multi-material 3D printing technology at the CHU de Bordeaux demonstrates its capability to improve medical operations by decreasing complexities to make the surgeon's role easier. Moreover, by enhancing procedures in this way, the prospect of organ-conserving surgery is increased, resulting in a far more favorable outcome for patients."

Stratasys announced that worldwide moldmaker, HASCO, has developed a rapid, cost-efficient method to producing low volumes of injection molded prototypes by integrating Stratasys 3D printing with its K3500 quick-change mold system. Utilizing this innovative approach, molders can quickly change between inserts for different products, enabling them to cost-effectively produce low volumes of injection molded parts for samples, prototypes and small production runs.

HASCO 3D printed the inserts in Stratasys’ ultra-tough Digital ABS material using the Objet500 Connex Multi-material 3D Production System. With a 3D printed mold insert taking only hours to produce, molders can make design modifications to the product for a fraction of the time and cost of conventional tooling methods.

“With time-to-market cycles shorter than ever and production quantities dropping, our customers are now looking for solutions that enable them to deliver prototypes quickly and cost-effectively,” says Dirk Paulmann, Executive Vice President, Sales & Business Development at HASCO. “Compared with conventional metal or aluminum inserts, our new approach offers molders the flexibility to quickly produce and switch inserts, making them much more productive and profitable. Combining our longstanding heritage in mold making with Stratasys’ pioneering expertise in 3D printing injection molds, this best of both worlds technique is the future of prototype and low volume production.”

When producing a sealing plug for its industry-standard A8001 clamping fixture, HASCO identified that the walls of the ABS plastic sealing screw would need to be 12mm thick to seal the large number of threaded holes. Given this geometry, it was clear that that the screw could not be produced using the conventional injection molding process. With the level of intricacy enabled by Stratasys PolyJet 3D printing, HASCO redesigned the screw with a reduced wall thickness and subsequently 3D printed a mold insert to the new specifications in order to test the integrity of the design before mass production.

“The speed of the process was incredible,” explains Paulmann. “Using our Objet500 Connex 3D Production System, we produced the parts of the cavity that shape the polymer – such as the inserts and slides – in just six hours compared to the 24 hours it previously took. We then worked with prototyping specialists Canto Ing. GmbH, Lüdenscheid to finish the 3D printed inserts and test the sample mold. We were delighted with the result, the first sealing screws were produced ready for mounting on our clamping unit in a record time of only four days.

“Through the use of tried-and-tested standardized HASCO products and Stratasys state-of-the-art 3D printing, the project has proved that it is possible to implement this innovative rapid-technology application within the injection molding process. For the production of low-volume prototypes in the final product material, the ability to quickly change molds with a 3D printed cavity offers a rapid, low-cost alternative to conventional methods,” he adds.

Nadav Sella, Director, Manufacturing Tools, Vertical Business Unit, Stratasys, concludes, “We’re extremely excited about what this collaboration has done to advance the low volume injection molding process and the resulting manufacturing efficiencies that can be achieved by molders. We view this as an application area with significant potential and will continue to work with partners such as HASCO to further extend the benefits of additive manufacturing into the world of mold making and injection molding.”

For more information, visit: www.hasco.com

Stratasys announced that UK start-up company, Nipi Smart Cooler, has created a one-of-a-kind ‘smart’ cooler using 3D printing. Employed throughout product development, Stratasys’ technology has enabled Nipi to realize a functional prototype 75% faster than using traditional manufacturing methods. Aimed at the consumer market, the company has already surpassed its crowdfunding goal, and was recently backed by an Asian investor in order to accelerate the product to market.

Competing to be the world’s most diverse, multi-purpose cooler, Nipi is a solar-panel-powered cooler offering ice retention of up to six days and is packed with a host of features including a charging hub, internal and external LED lighting, a safe deposit, cup holders and chopping board. According to Luke Guttery, Product Design Lead at Nipi Smart Cooler, 3D printing was crucial in quickly converting Nipi from a concept into a working product. 

“It’s amazing how quickly we could go from an idea on a piece of paper to a fully-functional prototype that we could test outdoors,” he says. “Without 3D printing, this simply would not have been achievable in the given timeframe. In just a few days we had already produced the main body in UV resistant materials to test the solar panels in the sun, and large-scale over-molded wheels with rigid interiors and rubber treads. Using this technology, we were able to develop a final working prototype in a just under a week, whereas with traditional manufacturing it would be closer to a month.

“For start-ups like us, I cannot overemphasize how important it is to quickly get to a stage where you can feasibly say whether your idea could be a viable product. Having access to this technology gives us the ability to make that decision faster than ever before,” adds Guttery.

In order to realize the initial concept designs as a 100% working prototype, Nipi turned to UK 3D printing service provider, 3D Print Bureau. Using both Stratasys’ FDM and PolyJet 3D printing solutions, the company produced a number of fully-functional parts during the development of Nipi to eliminate problematic design issues, before committing to final manufacturing.

With outdoor enthusiasts its core target audience, prototyping the main body of the smart cooler required a material that could endure the continued exposure to sunlight. Using Stratasys’ superior UV and heat resistant ASA thermoplastic material, 3D Print Bureau was able to produce a working prototype that could support the solar panel testing required in multiple outdoor environments. This enabled the Nipi team to make the design iterations required to ensure its fit-for-purpose for customers.

Stratasys multi-material 3D printing was used to produce over- molded parts, such as the handles and large tires that required accurate combinations of rigid and rubber-like materials. With the ability to 3D print these multi-material parts in a single build, as well as the capability to mix materials on-the-fly to create new material properties, 3D Print Bureau was able to quickly produce several variations in different levels of hardness for the Nipi team to test.

“Utilizing the best of each of Stratasys’ 3D printing technologies was integral to getting a fully-functional, test-worthy prototype to the Nipi team,” says Gary Miller, Managing Director of 3D Print Bureau. “With the ASA material, we were able to develop a fade-resistant prototype specifically designed for outdoor use. Using multi-material 3D printing, we could accurately validate the pull of the handle and its weight-bearing ability, as well as defining the exact tread of the tires required before moving to final production. In fact, the ability to over-mold using 3D printing was integral as it helped us determine the shape, thickness and style of the tread you see on Nipi today.”

Andy Middleton, President of Stratasys EMEA, concludes: “For many start-ups with great ideas, limited capital to supplement costly and time-consuming traditional manufacturing is often the reason some innovations fail to reach the marketplace. 3D printing grants product designers the means to quickly and cost-effectively determine whether their idea can function and perform as intended, and Nipi is the perfect example.”

Stratasys along with its subsidiaries GrabCAD and MakerBot, announced the winners of the CubeSat Challenge after a month-long, highly competitive engineering competition.

Home to the world's largest community of mechanical engineers, the GrabCAD Community was invited to use 3D printing to rethink the design of a CubeSat, a standardized small satellite frame originally developed to allow university students to build low-cost satellites for research and education purposes. The goal was to design CubeSat structures that would be faster and easier to manufacture, and pack more utility into the very small volume that CubeSat designers had to work with. Participants had the chance to win prizes that range from MakerBot Replicator Desktop 3D Printers to cash to manufacturing services provided by Stratasys Direct Manufacturing.

Surpassing expectations, over 200 entries were submitted from all engineering disciplines and geographic locations. The submissions demonstrate the ability of additive manufacturing to vastly improve design over traditional manufacturing methods. “Engineers were able to reduce satellite structures from up to 50 parts down to two or three parts by using additive manufacturing,” said Scott Sevcik, business development manager for aerospace and defense at Stratasys. “There were a number of very creative approaches to redesigning the satellite structure, and it was great to see several of the entries consolidate the build down to two or as few as one part. That highlights one of the most significant benefits of 3D printing a structure.

Reducing part count from 50 to three can make a significant impact on a manufacturer’s operations. It can:

  • Reduce the amount of assembly labor, which saves cost and time.
  • Reduce the risk of assembly error, or a late part delaying production.
  • Reduce the risk of repetitive stress and other ergonomic injuries due to assembly effort.
  • Simplify the supply chain, reducing purchasing, receiving inspection and other ancillary risks and costs.


First place was awarded to Paolo Minetola for his entry FoldSat, a design that uses geometries only possible with 3D printing. Second place went to David Franklin for his entry STRATASATT – FDM ONE, a design that illustrates customization using real CubeSat components. Third place went to Chris Esser with his entry Foldable Articulated CubeSat for Additive Manufacturing. His design featured 3D printed threads and six hinged panels.

Entries were judged based on technical requirements including feasibility, production, value and being optimized for additive manufacturing. The judging panel included experts from the aerospace and 3D printing industry:

  • Dr. Jordi Puig-Suari, Cal Poly Professor and Co-Inventor of the CubeSat Standard
  • Dr. Robert Hoyt, CEO and Chief Scientist, Tethers Unlimited Inc.
  • David Espalin, Center Manager - W.M. Keck Center for 3D Innovation, University of Texas, El Paso
  • Adam Hadaller, Mission Manager, Spaceflight Industries
  • Patrick Price, Aerospace Additive Manufacturing Research Engineer, Stratasys
  • Jesse Marin, Aerospace Project Engineer, Stratasys Direct Manufacturing
  • Jonathan Cook, Director of Product, MakerBot


The Aerospace vertical solutions team sponsored the CubeSat Challenge, with collaboration from GrabCAD, MakerBot and Stratasys Direct Manufacturing.

For more information or to view the winning results, visit: www.grabcad.com/challenges/the-cubesat-challenge/results

Stratasys Ltd. (Nasdaq:SSYS) announced that Italian Service Bureau, ZARE, has halved production costs for its direct manufacturing customers in automotive and aerospace since investing in a fleet of Stratasys Fortus 3D Production Systems.

Following the longstanding success of using Stratasys PolyJet and FDM 3D printing for prototyping applications, the company now deploys its Fortus 3D Production Systems to expand its direct manufacturing services to customers. This spans a spectrum of traditional manufacturing applications, including injection molding, tooling and the production of final parts.

“After a steady decline in traditional manufacturing business, the introduction of Stratasys Fortus FDM technology has given us a significant edge over our competition and has enabled us to reduce manufacturing costs for our aerospace and automotive customers by 50 percent,” says Andrea Pasquali, R&D Manager of ZARE. “This has been key to revitalizing our direct manufacturing business, as we can quickly produce durable end-use parts for our customers in the final material. We have seen a substantial reduction in iteration costs and turnaround times, and we have reduced the cost per final part by around 30 percent.”

Pasquali explains: “For one customer, we tested a 3D printed prototype of an aerospace pipe that we produced in high performance ULTEM 9085 thermoplastic material. However, with the material’s high strength-to-weight ratio and FST (flame, smoke and toxicity) rating, we quickly realised that we could go beyond functional prototype testing and actually manufacture final-parts that match the strength of metal.

“By replacing metal-manufactured parts with high performance thermoplastics, our customers can meet a vital requirement of aircraft manufacturing by reducing overall weight, while maintaining production quality and adhering to passenger safety requirements. A great example of this is the use of additive manufacturing to directly manufacture lightweight air conditioning ducts for aircraft.”

The expansion of additive manufacturing services to include both prototyping and direct manufacturing has had a positive impact across the business, not only for aerospace, but also automotive manufacturing. According to Pasquali, applications for these two sectors now account for nearly 50 percent of ZARE’s operations thanks to the advanced 3D printing materials available from Stratasys.

Pasquali explains: “The wide range of materials at our disposal enables us to select characteristics that match those of traditional manufactured parts at a fraction of the weight and cost. For example, leveraging its high UV-stability, we now manufacture car bumpers in ASA and headlights in PC-ABS, which combines both the superior strength and heat resistance of PC and the flexibility of ABS.”

Davide Ferrulli, Stratasys' Italian Territory Manager concludes: “As ZARE demonstrates, the use of additive manufacturing for the production of production parts in key industries such as aerospace and automotive offers a fast and cost-effective way to improve areas of the traditional manufacturing process. With our materials advancing, customers are finding that they can build more parts than ever before with parallel strength and durability to those traditionally manufactured.”

For more information, visit: www.zare.it

Stratasys Ltd. (Nasdaq:SSYS) announced it has acquired a key German channel partner, RTC Rapid Technologies GmbH. This transaction aims to strengthen the company's presence in the important German Speaking Countries (GSC) region of Germany, Switzerland and Austria and aligns with Stratasys' growth strategy for the region.

Following the acquisition, Stratasys will continue to offer the full suite of Stratasys 3D printing solutions and services to the installed base of RTC Rapid Technologies and will work with its regional resellers to further capitalize on growth opportunities in selected verticals in the region.

Stratasys and RTC Rapid Technologies have experienced a mutually beneficial partnership since 2003, with RTC Rapid Technologies being a key European partner that helped establish and develop the GSC region. With this transaction, Stratasys will incorporate to its German operations, a seasoned channel partner team that includes customer service, application support, sales and marketing expertise. Stratasys believes that integrating the RTC Rapid Technologies team will better position the company to serve its partners and customers in the GSC region.

"The GSC region is important to Stratasys. By bringing the expertise of RTC Rapid Technologies founders and employees in-house and their intimate familiarity with the GSC region customers, the extended team is expected to add substantial value, being highly focused on our key accounts and business development efforts in this region," says Stratasys EMEA President, Andy Middleton. "RTC Rapid Technologies has been an invaluable partner and an extension of our company for over 12 years, and I am confident that our new relationship will be a winning combination for Stratasys, our partners and customers alike."

For more information, visit: www.rtc-germany.com

Stratasys Ltd. (Nasdaq:SSYS), a leading global provider of 3D printing and additive manufacturing solutions, announced a joint marketing partnership in North America with Creaform, a worldwide leader in portable 3D measurement solutions.

This new partnership empowers users to leverage cutting-edge 3D scanning technology and world-class 3D printing technology designed to streamline the process across various industries and applications.

With a professional-grade solution, the user is able to accurately scan any 3D object and quickly generate print-ready files or even perform direct 3D-scan-to-print.

Example applications include:

  • Product design: reverse engineering and prototyping
  • Manufacturing: development of custom dies and molds, and the fabrication of jigs and fixtures
  • Health care: design of prosthetics, orthotics, surgical aids and guides
  • Education: mechanical engineering and design curriculums


“3D printing and 3D scanning go hand-in-hand. This combination is targeted at allowing companies of all types to accelerate their product development processes and ensure that their products truly meet the needs for which they were designed. We believe that Creaform’s Go!SCAN 3D scanners and VXmodel Scan-to-Print software are the perfect complement to Stratasys 3D Printers,” says Creaform’s Marco St-Pierre, Division Vice President, Innovation and Technology. “There is clear and natural synergy between our technologies, audiences and applications, and partnering with the market leader is a tremendous opportunity for us.”

“By partnering with Creaform, Stratasys is able to offer its customers access to a new source of 3D printable content. This is expected to enhance existing solutions and open up new applications in a wide range of industries. We view Creaform to be an excellent addition to our growing partner ecosystem,” says Bruce Bradshaw, Vice President of Marketing, Stratasys, North America.

Jointly authorized, Stratasys and Creaform resellers in North America will promote and sell each party’s components to the end user. Under the terms of the agreement, both companies have agreed to invest in joint go-to-market capabilities including marketing and joint channel recruitment.

The companies will be demonstrating the joint solution at the American Society for Engineering Education Conference and Exposition, June 14 – 17 in Seattle, Washington.

For more information, visit: www.creaform3d.com/en

Do you think 3D printers are just a new fad for hobbyists making knickknacks or limited to making prototypes? Don’t tell that to rocket manufacturer United Launch Alliance (ULA).

Making launch vehicles for NASA, the Air Force and commercial satellites, ULA knows 3D printing is a serious tool that has been around more than 25 years and is a growing production process; And ULA knows a thing or two about critical applications. On the lower-end, its rockets cost a cool $165 million and they must propel into space billion-dollar satellites weighing more than 60,000 pounds.

“It’s about as demanding an application as you can get,” says Rich Garrity, VP and General Manager Vertical Solutions Unit for Additive Manufacturing system maker Stratasys Ltd. (Nasdaq:SSYS). “Rockets must endure pressure, G-force, speed, vibration, heat, and extreme cold.”

United Launch Alliance is a launch services company in the U.S., and with its heritage systems – Atlas and Delta – it has supported America’s presence in space for more than 50 years. Like other leading edge manufacturers using 3D printing, ULA progressed from prototyping to tooling and then to flight hardware production.

After acquiring two Fortus 900mc 3D Production Systems from Stratasys, ULA began the process of updating the Environmental Control System (ECS) duct on the Atlas V, which will launch with the new 3D component in 2016. The ECS duct is critical to the countdown sequence of a launch, delivering nitrogen to sensitive electronic components within the rocket booster.

The previous design for the ECS duct assembly contained 140 parts, but by modifying the design using FDM 3D Printing Technology, ULA consolidated the number of parts to only 16. This significantly reduces installation time and results in a 57 percent part-cost reduction.

ULA selected ULTEM 9085 FDM thermoplastic material to produce durable, high-performance end-use parts. “ULTEM 9085 has great strength properties over a wide temperature range,” said Greg Arend, Program Manager for Additive Manufacturing at ULA. “We have done testing to show that it is very capable of withstanding temperatures from cryogenic all the way up to extreme heat. And it’s tough enough to handle the vibration and stress of lift off and flight. We’re very satisfied with its performance.”

The Atlas V won’t likely be the last launch vehicle incorporating 3D printing technology. ULA has ambitious plans to increase the quantity of 3D printed parts to over 100 on the next generation rocket.

“We see somewhat of an exponential growth in the utility of 3D printing for flight applications on our current vehicles,” said Arend. “And we intend to use it heavily with our Vulcan rocket.”

For more information, visit: www.ulalaunch.com

Stratasys Ltd. (Nasdaq:SSYS), a global provider of 3D printing and additive manufacturing solutions, announced the appointment of Joshua Claman as Chief Business Officer (CBO), effective immediately. In this newly created role, Claman will oversee the Company’s Global Sales, Service and Channel organizations.  He will be particularly focused on driving commercial and go-to-market synergies across the company’s different business units, including Stratasys Direct Manufacturing and MakerBot.  He will report directly to David Reis, CEO of Stratasys.

“I am excited to announce the appointment of Josh Claman as CBO, and am certain that his proven ability to successfully lead complex businesses around the world will bring tremendous value to Stratasys,” said Reis.  “As CBO, he will play a critical role in supporting our strategic initiatives as we work to improve collaboration, customer intimacy and enhance our go-to-market strategy.  We continue to see additive manufacturing being used to transform manufacturing processes across industries and we look forward to benefitting from Josh’s significant expertise as we build on our strong track record of growth and execution.”

Claman said, “Stratasys is a respected leader in the 3D printing space with a strong portfolio of solutions and services, and significant future growth prospects. I am excited to work with this talented team to solidify the company’s leading position in additive manufacturing.”

Previously, Claman served as President of ReachLocal, a global online marketing and advertising solution provider.  Prior to ReachLocal, Claman spent over 10 years at Dell, where he held a variety of senior positions including VP Large Enterprise Business Americas, VP Public Sector EMEA, VP Channel Sales EMEA and GM of Dell’s UK/Ireland operation.  Prior to that, Claman spent 15 years at NCR, a computer hardware, software and electronics company, where he was VP Services, Europe.  Claman received a BA from the University of Illinois and an MBA from the University of South Carolina.

For more information, visit: www.stratasys.com/corporate/about-us

Stratasys Ltd. (Nasdaq:SSYS) announced that its technology is illuminating the stage in the opening song of US pop star, Katy Perry’s Prismatic World Tour with vibrantly colored 3D printed mohawks produced by leading Hollywood special effects company, Legacy Effects.

Inspired by the plume of an ancient Roman’s imperial-centurion helmets, the mohawk’s main structure is manufactured using Stratasys 3D printing and features captivating colorful programmed lighting in the peak. With the prominent theme of color running throughout the tour, the headpiece wows audiences with a spectrum of bright lights, igniting an explosion of spectacular pyrotechnics in the opening song.

Set to feature throughout the year-long world tour, the mohawks are personalized to perfectly fit the individual backing dancer, ensuring that they remain in place throughout the renowned opening song, Roar.

“When Katy Perry’s art assistant gave us the brief with such a short turnaround time, we knew instantly that creating something so complex and visually striking, with the need for durability, could only be achieved with 3D printing,” explains Jason Lopes, Lead Systems Engineer at Legacy Effects. “Traditionally, it’s virtually impossible and very costly to produce such complex personalized pieces by hand, taking into consideration the time to work out the programming of the lighting elements. With Stratasys 3D printing technology, we were able to develop fully-illuminated pieces with a lightning fast turnaround of under a week. For developing one-off props for the music industry, this is revolutionary.”

Given the need of the eye-catching headgear to withstand continual use throughout the world tour, Legacy Effects opted to 3D print the outer crest in robust ABS-M30 FDM thermoplastic, ideal for holding the whole unit together. Similarly, thanks to its high dimensional stability and fine detail visualisation, the inset of the mohawks was produced in Stratasys’ rigid VeroGray material.

“We wanted to amplify the bright colors of the mohawks to complement the dance routine and lighting throughout the performance and we knew that PolyJet’s ability to house a sheet of acrylic inside would ensure that the contrast in colors was emphasized regardless of the spectators’ position in the arena,” explains Lopes.

Lopes concludes: “This is hugely exciting for us as Katy is such a high profile client, but it also represents how 3D printing is enabling us to meet the complex demands of projects like these immediately and providing our clients results within a day. To see 3D printed end-use parts in action during a live concert performance is something else!”

Gilad Gans, President of North American Operations, Stratasys, concludes: “We are seeing more and more of our customers using 3D printing beyond just a prototyping tool, but as a way to directly manufacture some of the most complex parts as final products. In the case of Katy Perry’s head pieces, the ability to 3D print personalized one-off parts, customized to each dancer, is a perfect example of how the future of manufacturing is moving towards mass customization.”

For more information, visit: www.stratasys.com

Stratasys Ltd. (NASDAQ: SSYS) announced that the team at Econolyst, a top Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing consultancy and research firm, will join Stratasys Services Group.  Econolyst’s highly skilled team, led by Dr. Phil Reeves, a 20-year industry veteran in the Additive Manufacturing space, will form the foundation of the new Stratasys Strategic Consulting Division. This Division will complement Stratasys’ other Services offerings, which are designed to help customers build their Additive Manufacturing vision and strategy, support implementation and optimize 3D Printing workflows.  Stratasys expects the addition of Econolyst to help organizations better understand the value of Additive Manufacturing, increasing adoption over time.

Econolyst offers a broad range of strategic consulting services and support for Additive Manufacturing adoption, education and innovation to a diverse set of global clients. For more than a decade, Econolyst has been helping businesses around the world understand the strategic economic, business, social and environmental benefits of Additive Manufacturing.  As part of Stratasys, the Strategic Consulting Division will strengthen the breadth and depth of Stratasys’ Services expertise and capabilities.  The Strategic Consulting Division will provide independent, expert consulting around Additive Manufacturing strategy development, ideation and innovation and implementation planning across technologies and solutions.  Importantly, it will remain technology agnostic.

The Stratasys Services Group is led by Hanoch Magid, Executive Vice President, Services and Materials. The Group includes:

  • The newly founded Strategic Consulting Division to be led by Dr. Reeves;
  • The Professional Services Division that helps customers optimize their Additive Manufacturing workflows and identify disruptive onsite opportunities; and
  • The Customer Support Division that provides support, maintenance and training to existing customers.

“We believe that Additive Manufacturing technology is poised to enter a new phase of increased adoption in a broad range of industries, disrupting traditional manufacturing processes,” said David Reis, Chief Executive Officer of Stratasys.  “Expanding our services offering is a key pillar of our investment plan to capitalize on this opportunity.  Stratasys has the unique ability to provide organizations with a broad range of Additive Manufacturing technologies and solutions, coupled with our in-depth process specific expertise.  The addition of Dr. Reeves, a thought leader in the industry, and his team will further strengthen Stratasys’ services capabilities, and we are excited to welcome them to Stratasys.”

For more information, visit: www.econolyst.co.uk

Stratasys Ltd. (Nasdaq:SSYS), a provider of 3D printing and additive manufacturing solutions, introduced new colors for its ASA thermoplastic and expanded its Digital Materials.

Launched in September, ASA is an all-purpose FDM material used for the production of prototypes, manufacturing tools and finished goods. Adding to the previously launched ivory and black, the eight new color options for ASA include: red, orange, dark gray, yellow, green, dark blue, white and light gray. ASA now offers the most color options of any FDM material, allowing users the flexibility to create colorful parts that are UV resistant, strong and durable.

ASA offers an exceptional surface finish and has the best aesthetics of any FDM material available. Compared to ABS, details such as printed text and other features are greatly improved by ASA’s matte finish.

Compatible with the Fortus 360mc, 380mc, 400mc, 450mc and 900mc 3D Production Systems, ASA thermoplastic can be used by manufacturers in a variety of industries including sporting goods, outdoor tools, electrical, toys and automotive.

In addition to ASA’s new color options, Stratasys is expanding its PolyJet technology (which offers more than 1,000 material options) by adding 20 two-component Digital Materials that combine Endur with other base materials. Endur Digital Materials allow users to create parts using a range of gray-scale colors with rigid material options, as well as the ability to select a variety of Shore A values with flexible material options.

Eight new rigid Digital Materials offer a range of six gray shades and two white shades. Twelve new flexible Digital Materials offer a range of Shore A values. Six of these combine Endur with TangoBlackPlus and six combine Endur with TangoPlus.

Launched in 2014, Endur is an advanced simulated polypropylene material for use with the Objet EdenV, Objet EdenVS, Objet Connex systems, Objet30 Prime and Objet30 Pro 3D Printers. Endur offers prototyping benefits to a wide range of manufacturers in the consumer goods, household appliances, automotive parts, consumer electronics and lab equipment industries. Endur Digital Materials, available for Objet Connex 3D Printers, can produce thin walls, living hinges, snap-fits and moving or assembled parts. Examples include containers, CD cases, gaskets, shoe soles or handles.

“By introducing Endur Digital Materials, we are giving customers more flexibility and versatility to 3D print durable prototypes,” said Boaz Jacobi, director of product management for PolyJet consumables. “It’s a superior PolyJet solution for living-hinge and snap-fit applications.”

For more information, visit: www.stratasys.com/materials

RedEye, a Stratasys Company (Nasdaq:SSYS) has partnered with NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to 3D print 30 antenna array supports for the FORMOSAT-7 Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC-2) satellite mission.

Scheduled for launch in 2016, the COSMIC-2 mission marks the first time 3D printed parts will function externally in outer space. The antenna arrays will capture atmospheric and ionospheric data to help improve weather prediction models and advance meteorological research on Earth.

In order to keep the project on time and on budget, JPL needed an alternative to machining the parts out of astroquartz, the material traditionally used for the arrays. They turned to RedEye to produce 3D printed parts that could handle the complex array designs and also be strong enough to withstand the demands of outer space.

RedEye built the custom-designed parts using Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM), the only additive manufacturing process able to meet the project’s strength and load requirements. JPL chose durable ULTEM 9085 material, a thermoplastic that has similar strength to metals like aluminum but weighs much less.

“Using FDM for a project like this has never been done before and it demonstrates how 3D printing is revolutionizing the manufacturing industry,” said Jim Bartel, vice president and general manager at RedEye. “If this technology can be validated for use in the harsh environment of outer space, its capabilities are seemingly endless for projects here on Earth.”

While ULTEM 9085 has been well-vetted in the aerospace industry and is flammability rated by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), it has not previously been used or tested for an exterior application in space. The material passed qualification testing to meet NASA class B/B1 flight hardware requirements. To protect the antenna array supports against oxygen atoms and ultraviolet radiation, a layer of NASA’s S13G protective paint was applied to the parts.

“The intricate design of the arrays and the durability of ULTEM 9085 made additive manufacturing a perfect choice for this project,” said Joel Smith, strategic account manager for aerospace and defense at RedEye. “Not only did it prove the strength of 3D printed parts, but using FDM to build these supports significantly reduced time and cost.”

Learn more about how RedEye and JPL used FDM to build parts to meet these unique specifications by reading the case study.

For more information, visit: www.redeyeondemand.com/3d-printing-case-studies/nasa-3d-printed-satellite

Stratasys Ltd. (Nasdaq:SSYS) announced the appointment of Chris Morgan as Senior Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer (CMO) for Stratasys. Morgan is a 25-year veteran of HP.

Effective immediately, Morgan will assume responsibility for Stratasys’ global marketing activities, including developing strategy and building a global team that will support the company’s worldwide expansion and rapid growth.

“As a senior vice president of HP’s multi-billion dollar graphics solutions business in the Printing and Personal Systems Group, Morgan was responsible for several thousand employees worldwide and helped drive HP from challenger to established market leader,” says Stratasys Executive Vice President, Dan Yalon, whom Morgan will report to. “His experience and skills are what we sought in a marketing leader.”

“Chris is an accomplished senior executive with an impressive background of building and growing multi-billion dollar businesses and developing high-performance organizations,” says Stratasys CEO, David Reis. “At HP he was instrumental in helping shape the transition from analogue to digital in the 2D printer world.”

From 2004 through 2009, Morgan was a senior vice president for HP’s imaging and printing business in the Asia Pacific/Japan region. Between 2001 and 2004, he led worldwide marketing strategy and sales for HP’s imaging and printing business. In this role, he drove brand and demand activities globally and orchestrated global development of key channels and routes to market. He also led strategy development for the entire business.

For more information, visit: www.stratasys.com

Stratasys Ltd. (Nasdaq:SSYS) introduced the Fortus 450mc and Fortus 380mc 3D production systems, which provide improved reliability, speed and accessibility.

Using FDM Technology, both 3D production systems are designed to provide high-quality engineering grade parts that can be used to reduce the time to bring a product to market, create jigs and fixtures for manufacturing, as well as produce low volume end-use parts. “This new generation of 3D printers is aimed to improve the customers’ overall experience,” said Bill Schultz, senior director of FDM products for Stratasys. “Improved system navigation, system maintenance, and system performance builds upon the proven history of the Fortus family of products. Complex geometries now take less time to print with our new systems.”

Fortus 380mc

The Fortus 380mc has the same advanced features as the Fortus 450mc including even temperature distribution in the build chamber and a digital touch screen. On average, the 3D printer can build parts up to 20 percent faster with a build envelope of 14 in. x 12 in. x 12 in. (355mm x 305mm x 305mm) with the same layer resolutions as the Fortus 450mc.

Material capacity for the Fortus 380mc includes two canisters, one for model and one for support material. The Fortus 380mc is ideal for large and midsize manufacturers producing complex, smaller parts such as fixtures and tools.

“We are simplifying the FDM portfolio and updating a strong product line by adding the Fortus 450mc and 380mc, giving the user a better experience,” says Schultz.

Stratasys offers customers three material bundles for the new Fortus Production 3D Printers. The bundles available are Standard (ABS and ASA), Engineering (PC and Nylon) and High Performance (ULTEM® 9085). The Standard and Engineering material bundle is available for both the Fortus 450mc and Fortus 380mc, and the High Performance material bundle is available for the Fortus 450mc. Users can select from one, two or all three of the material bundles to enable their system to run a range of FDM materials.

Fortus 450mc

The Fortus 450mc can manufacture parts up to 15 percent faster than its predecessor. It has a build envelope of 16 in. x 14 in. x 16 in. (406mm x 355mm x 406mm), and it can produce layer resolutions ranging from 0.005 in. to 0.013 in. (0.127mm to 0.330mm).

A digital touch screen allows users to make adjustments to their print job without disrupting the 3D printer. The full-color display provides model and support head temperatures, calibration settings and lists print jobs in the queue.

The Fortus 450mc has capacity for two model material and two support material canisters, and the usage level can be monitored using the touch screen. Industries including aerospace, government, military and medical, requiring complex functional prototypes, production aides and end-use parts in specialized materials may benefit by using the Fortus 450mc.

For more information, visit: www.stratasys.com/3d-printers/production-series/fortus-380-450mc

Wednesday, 05 November 2014 14:14

Stratasys Announces New ULTEM 1010 Material

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Designed specifically with manufacturers in mind, ULTEM 1010 combines superior heat resistance, tensile strength and chemical resistance and can be sterilized using steam autoclaving for medical applications. These properties make the ULTEM 1010 the right choice for aerospace, automotive, food production tooling, and medical device manufacturing and functional prototyping applications. Available for the Fortus 900mc, ULTEM 1010 is bio-compatible and has the only food-contact certification of any FDM thermoplastic.

“The global design and manufacturing market continues to push toward creating smarter products with greater efficiency. Because we believe in, and support this trend, we have announced today a range of solutions that focus on ‘democratizing design.’ Our customers, whatever their size or industry, can now access a wide spectrum of cutting-edge 3D printing capabilities and deliver competitive advantage,” said Gilad Yron, sr. vice president, Product Management, Stratasys. “We invite every designer and manufacturer at this year’s EuroMold to visit one of our three booths to see how 3D printing is shaping the way we manufacture.”

“ULTEM 1010 offers a new level of performance to our FDM materials portfolio,” said Brendan Dillon, product manager for Stratasys. “The combination of the low coefficient of thermal expansion and the industry certifications will allow this material to enhance many current applications, and could open the door to many new users of 3D printing.”

Ideal for aerospace, automotive, food processing and medical device applications, ULTEM 1010 combines strength and thermal stability for advanced industrial tooling. Applications for aerospace and automotive include clips, housings and ducts. Food production tools include patterns, dies and fixtures. Custom medical tools include surgical guides, fixtures and trays.

For more information, visit: www.stratasys.com/materials/fdm/ultem-1010

Stratasys Ltd and GoEngineer, a Stratasys reseller, will be part of a new television series on MAVTV called TITAN American Built. The series features machine shop owner Titan Gilroy and his mission to put American manufacturing back on top of the world.

Season one of TITAN American Built will take a unique and personal approach to the world of manufacturing and innovation .With the use of state of the art machinery and cutting edge technology like 3D printing, Gilroy will show how American manufacturing can compete in a global market.

An expert in CNC machinery and now a manufacturing entrepreneur, Gilroy opened his own machine shop, Titan American MFG 10 years ago. Along with his team, Gilroy, produces the world’s most intricate parts, completing impossible projects that no other team would dare attempt. Gilroy wants to be on the fore front of manufacturing technology and for the first time, Gilroy and his team will be using a Fortus 250mc 3D Printer from Stratasys, which will compliment his current CNC offerings.

“Episode one highlights our shop using 3D printing in order to manufacture thermal night vision scopes for IR Defense - it’s amazing. Time is the real currency of this industry, and because creating fixturing components is an art, it demands a lot of time to manufacture intricate parts,” says Gilroy. “Instead of waiting two weeks for final product, we can design and create a prototype in just one day with this 3D printer, it has taken our shop to a higher level of efficiency and precision.”

“3D printing is changing the way the world is manufacturing and we are thrilled to partner with Titan Gilroy and show America what is possible when incorporating 3D printing into your overall manufacturing process,” stated Gilad Gans, president, Stratasys North America.

GoEngineer, a reseller of Stratasys 3D Printers, is co-sponsoring TITAN American Built. Ken Coburn, president and founder of GoEngineer, shares in Gilroy’s enthusiasm and vision for the future of manufacturing in America. “I met with Gilroy to discuss the show earlier this year and immediately knew I wanted to help support his passion for educating America on the significant role of manufacturing in the United States. Gilroy recognizes that leveraging new technologies like 3D printing in the right circumstances can help companies gain back the competitive edge needed to help them compete in a constantly changing global economy,” explained Coburn.

Titan American Built premieres Oct. 24 at 10 p.m. ET on MAVTV, currently available on Dish (CH. 248) DIRECTV (CH. 214) and Verizon (CH. 810).

For more information, visit: www.mavtv.com/shows/titan.html

Stratasys is now accepting submissions to the 11th annual Extreme Redesign 3D Printing Challenge.

Open to students worldwide, this annual 3D printing challenge invites students in engineering, design and art or architecture to create a new product that improves how a task is accomplished or to redesign an existing product. Entries should be mechanically sound, realistic and achievable, and are judged based on:

  • Sound mechanical design and part integrity
  • Compelling description (written and/or video)
  • Design creativity
  • Product usefulness
  • Aesthetics (art or architecture category)

Individual students or two-person teams are required to create designs using 3D CAD software and to submit their design files in .STL format to Stratasys online, along with a written description and/or a 30-second video explaining the value and benefit of the Extreme Redesign model. The deadline to submit entries is Feb. 11, 2015. Categories include:

  • Engineering: Secondary Education (middle and high school)
  • Engineering: Post-Secondary (university, college or post-secondary)
  • Art or architecture (any grade level)

New this year, the first-place student winner in the post-secondary category will win a trip to a 3D printing/additive manufacturing conference in 2015 (location to be determined). First-place winners in every category will receive $2,500 (US dollars) scholarships, and the instructor of the first-place student will receive a demo 3D printer for a limited time to use in the classroom. Second and third place winners will receive $1,000 (US dollars) scholarships. The top-10 entries in each category will receive a Stratasys apparel item (value up to $50) and regional semi-finalists will receive a 3D printed model of their design. Each person who enters will receive an official Extreme Redesign T-shirt.

For more information, visit: www.stratasys.com/industries/education/extreme-redesign

Tuesday, 16 September 2014 08:32

Stratasys to Acquire GrabCAD

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Stratasys Ltd. (NASDAQ: SSYS), a leading global provider of 3D printing and additive manufacturing solutions, announced that it has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire privately-held GrabCAD, Inc. in an all-cash transaction.  Terms of the transaction were not disclosed.  The transaction is expected to be completed by the end of September, subject to the fulfillment of customary closing conditions.  Upon completion of the transaction, GrabCAD will operate as a unit within the Stratasys Global Products and Technology Group.  Hardi Meybaum, Co-founder and Chief Executive Officer of GrabCAD, will continue to lead GrabCAD within the group.

Founded in 2010 and led by Mr. Meybaum, a visionary entrepreneur and pioneer in 3D CAD cloud collaboration tools, GrabCAD is helping engineers get products to market faster by connecting people, content and technology.  GrabCAD offers GrabCAD Workbench, a cloud-based collaboration tool that enables engineers and designers to share, view and manage CAD files and other design data.  GrabCAD is also home to a community of more than 1.5 million members from around the world who can access a large public CAD file library as well as connect with other engineers.

The acquisition is expected to enable Stratasys to provide its customers with enhanced collaboration tools and improved accessibility relating to 3D CAD content.  The addition of GrabCAD Workbench provides Stratasys with an opportunity to drive communication and ease of use throughout the 3D printing process and grow its technology solutions and user communities.

“The addition of GrabCAD provides Stratasys with a leading cloud-based collaboration platform for engineering teams to manage, share and view CAD files,” said David Reis, Stratasys Chief Executive Officer.  “By increasing the collaboration and accessibility of 3D CAD files, we believe we can further accelerate the adoption of 3D printing solutions and Stratasys’ product offerings.  Together with GrabCAD, we believe that we will accelerate innovation and provide increased value to a growing universe of customers seeking to utilize 3D printing solutions.  We also welcome GrabCAD's active and important community to the Stratasys family.  The potential within our 3D ecosystem is very exciting.”

“GrabCAD was founded to bring the world’s engineers together and help them collaborate to bring better products to market faster,” said Hardi Meybaum, Chief Executive Officer of GrabCAD.  “By joining forces with Stratasys, a global leader in 3D printing and additive manufacturing, we believe we can extend the reach of one of the most exciting and innovative design collaboration technologies available.  With its broad and growing customer base and worldwide presence, Stratasys can provide more customers around the world with exciting new solutions to meet their design needs.”

Through its acquisition of GrabCAD, Stratasys expects to gain:

  • Knowledge: With the addition of GrabCAD, Stratasys gains an industry leading team of software professionals with a deep understanding of the needs of designers and engineers.

  • Products: GrabCAD’s cloud-based collaboration platform, Workbench, will enable Stratasys to offer customers a solution to drive communication and ease of use throughout the design and 3D printing process.  GrabCAD also provides Stratasys with the opportunity to further partner with CAD vendors and other ecosystem partners while offering innovative collaboration tools related to 3D CAD.

  • Community: GrabCAD has built a global, leading and fast growing community of mechanical engineers and designers, with 1.5 million users who are passionate about design.  This includes a large online community of M-CAD users and a significant public online repository of free CAD files, with more than 500,000 CAD designs available for download and nearly 50,000 file downloads per day.

GrabCAD is leading the Open Engineering movement, helping engineers get products to market faster by connecting people, content and technology.  GrabCAD Workbench makes it easy for engineers to share files, work with partners and complete projects on time, while the GrabCAD Community accelerates the design process by tapping into the knowledge and resources of the largest source of CAD content and engineering minds in the world. Founded in 2010, the company is backed by Matrix Partners and Charles River Ventures and is headquartered in Boston, MA with development offices in Estonia and the UK.

For more information, visit: www.grabcad.com

Stratasys Ltd. (Nasdaq:SSYS), a leading global provider of 3D printing and additive manufacturing solutions, today announced availability of a new thermoplastic material option for its FDM-based production 3D printers: ASA (Acrylonitrile Styrene Acrylate).

ASA is an all-purpose material used for the production of prototypes, manufacturing tools and finished goods. Manufacturers in the automotive, electronics, commercial, sporting goods and construction industries can benefit from ASA's UV stability, strength and durability. Applications include jigs and fixtures, electrical boxes, recreational vehicles and outdoor tools.

Compatible with the Fortus 360mc, 400mc and 900mc 3D Production Systems, ASA thermoplastic surpasses the capabilities of ABS, offering UV resistance, so parts will resist fading and remain durable with long-term exposure to direct sunlight. ASA offers an exceptional surface finish and has the best aesthetics of any FDM material available. Compared to ABS, details such as printed text and other features are greatly improved by ASA's matte finish.

"As 3D printing becomes a more mainstream production process, and parts are used for a longer period of time and in diverse environments, UV resistance becomes a must-have feature," explains Brendan Dillon, product manager for Stratasys. "Once customers use ASA, they may not go back to ABS."

Easy to use, ASA is a "green-flag" material allowing Stratasys Insight software users the ability to produce parts using default settings with a single click. Available in black and ivory, ASA is compatible with existing Stratasys SR-30 support material and priced similar to ABS.

For more information, visit: www.stratasys.com/materials/fdm/asa

Stratasys Ltd. (Nasdaq:SSYS), a leading global provider of 3D printing and additive manufacturing solutions, today introduced the Objet500 Connex1 and Objet500 Connex2 Multi-material 3D Printers featuring the company's unique triple-jetting technology.

Stratasys triple-jetting technology is designed to allow the user to build products with up to three different materials in a single run, or even mix multiple material droplets to form new digital materials such as tough Digital ABS.

Joining the Objet500 Connex3 Color Multi-material 3D Printer announced in January, the Objet500 Connex1 and Objet500 Connex2 offer designers and manufacturers superior versatility for materials, functionality and product realism capabilities.

Objet500 Connex1

Equipped with a large build envelope, the Objet500 Connex1 Multi-material 3D Printer can produce parts from three diverse materials in a single production run. This allows users to create assemblies with components formed from three different materials, or it can produce components that contain both rigid and flexible materials, such as rubber-like Tango and rigid Vero material. The 3D printer can build a part up to 19.3 in. x 15.4 in. x 7.9 in. (490mm x 390mm x 200mm) or a mixed tray of small parts. A larger material cabinet contains eight cartridges, resulting in more unattended run time and fewer material changeovers than previous models. Hot swapping - or reloading material and support cartridges while the 3D printer is operating - allows for continuous part production. Multi-material 3D printing achieves in a single, automated build what would be either impossible to achieve with conventional single-material 3D printers or would require hand assembly from multiple print jobs.

Objet500 Connex2

The Objet500 Connex2 Multi-material 3D Printer enables users to combine transparency, durability and flexibility in one part. It has all the capabilities of the Objet500 Connex1 plus the ability to combine droplets from two base materials to produce new materials or "Digital Materials." Digital ABS, for example, is the most durable material available for the Stratasys PolyJet process and is often used to produce mold cores and cavities for short-run injection molding. With more than 100 material options, Connex2 users can produce a variety of Shore A values in the same part with rigid or clear components, or can combine Digital ABS with pure Tango for strong over-molded handles and grips. The versatility of the Objet500 Connex2 also makes it ideal for creating custom manufacturing tools such as jigs and fixtures.

"Following the launch of the Objet500 Connex3 earlier this year, we saw the demand for additional multi-material 3D printers that can address a variety of applications in prototyping and manufacturing, such as tooling and molding," explains Stratasys' Senior Product Marketing Manager Ron Ellenbogen. "We were able to build on the success of our triple-jetting technology and expand the Objet500 Connex family with two 3D production systems that we believe set new standards for 3D printing price performance."

For more information, visit: www.stratasys.com/3d-printers/production-series

Stratasys Ltd. (Nasdaq:SSYS) announced it has collaborated with the Stan Winston School of Character Arts,  Legacy Effects, Condé Nast Entertainment and WIRED to create a 14-foot tall giant creature which will be showcased at the Comic-Con International 2014 conference. The conference takes place July 24-27 in San Diego, California.

The giant creature was designed by artists at the Stan Winston School. Engineers and technicians at Legacy Effects — the studio that brought to life Iron Man, Avatar, Pacific Rim and RoboCop characters — worked closely with Stratasys to build dozens of 3D-printed parts to create the character.

“Everything about the giant creature project was ambitious, including size, weight, delivery schedule and performance requirements,” said Matt Winston, co-founder of the Stan Winston School. “Without the close involvement of our partners at Stratasys, whose 3D printing technologies are, in our view, revolutionizing not only the manufacturing industry but the entertainment industry as well, none of it would have been possible.”

More than one third of the giant creature was 3D printed, including the chest armor, shoulders, arms and fingers. A variety of Stratasys 3D Printers were employed in the build process, including the Fortus 900mc which uses FDM 3D printing technology to build durable parts as large as 36 x 24 x 36 inches.

The parts were created using ABS-M30 thermoplastic material, which has excellent mechanical properties suitable for functional prototypes, jigs and fixtures and production parts.

In addition to 3D printed parts, the creature integrates a variety of video and sensor technologies to offer attendees at the event, as well as fans online, a unique interactive experience with the character.

“The main advantage to 3D printing was going directly from a concept design to an end use, physical part, helping avoid any interpretation by hand or casting in a different material,” said Jason Lopes, lead systems engineer at Legacy Effects. “There is a reason why Legacy Effects has always been a Stratasys house, and this giant creature build shows why.”

"We are excited to debut the series, How to Make a Giant Creature on The Scene with our partners. With last year’s success, we are eager to provide audiences with something bigger and better, which this new creation definitely is,” said Michael Klein, Executive Vice President, Programming and Content Strategy, Condé Nast Entertainment.

During last year’s Comic-Con International, the Stan Winston School and Legacy Effects also collaborated with Stratasys, WIRED and YouTube to introduce an interactive robot suit, which incorporated several 3D printed parts primarily for the robot’s facial structure.

“3D printing is opening up an entirely new world of possibilities in nearly every industry, including entertainment,” said Gilad Gans, President, Stratasys North America. “The giant creature represents the perfect marriage of technology and art coming together in an innovative way.”

For more information, visit: www.stratasys.com

Stratasys Ltd. (Nasdaq:SSYS) released a previously announced extension to its range of flexible and rigid material options for the Objet500 Connex3 Color Multi-material 3D Printer.

Hundreds of new rubber-like color materials and many rigid ones combined with existing options, allow virtually unlimited combinations of flexible, rigid, and translucent-to-opaque colors in a single print run. The new color options are ideal for creating medical, automotive and consumer product components in popular gray along with vibrant color components that offer true-to-life aesthetics. This allows the production of complete products without manual assembly. And it allows product designers to validate designs and make decisions further in advance of tooling to improve designs and reduce tooling costs, reduce development cycle and time-to-market.

"The Objet500 Connex3 is the only 3D printer that combines colors with multi-material 3D printing. The ability to mix rigid, flexible, transparent and opaque colors offers users unprecedented versatility to design and perfect products faster," says Stratasys Director of Materials & Applications Fred Fischer. "By extending the range of material options available, users can improve workflow speeds and enhance efficiency."

Ranging from transparent to opaque and spanning a wide selection of Shore A values, the new flexible color options comprise six rubber material palettes. These consist of:

  • Three flexible 72-color palettes, composed of rubber-like (TangoPlus) and combinations of rigid opaque (VeroCyan, VeroMagenta and VeroYellow) materials.

  • Three flexible 68-color palettes, built with rubber-like (TangoBlackPlus) and combinations of the same rigid opaque (Vero) colors.

Further strengthening its rigid color range, Stratasys also increased the number of gray and subtle color options with:

  • Three 45-color rigid gray palettes, each of which combines rigid VeroWhite and VeroBlack with colors.

  • One 45-hue gray palette, with varying levels of translucency, and which includes a reflective luster for the production of sleek, high-quality parts for products such as consumer electronics.

The new flexible color options are available immediately to Objet500 Connex3 Color Multi-material 3D Printer owners through a free software update.

For more information, visit: www.stratasys.com/3d-printers/design-series/precision/objet500-connex3

RedEye, by Stratasys (Nasdaq: SSYS), one of the world’s leading additive manufacturing service bureaus, recently partnered with Lockheed Martin’s Space Systems Company (SSC) to 3D print two large fuel tank simulators for a satellite form, fit and function validation test and process development. With the biggest tank measuring 15 feet long, the project marks one of the largest 3D printed parts RedEye has ever built.

With RedEye’s Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) technology, the team developed the fuel tanks within a highly condensed time frame and at about half the cost of machining the parts. These rapid prototyping advantages will help Lockheed Martin bring its new design to market faster in a competitive contract bid process.

“With RedEye’s machine capacity and engineering support, we were able to successfully build these tank simulators in a fraction of the time and at a fraction of the cost,” said Andrew Bushell, senior manufacturing engineer at Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company.

The larger tank was built in 10 different pieces and the smaller in 6 different pieces using polycarbonate (PC) material. Combined, the fuel tanks took nearly two weeks to print, taking roughly 150 hours per section. Based on the sheer size of the parts, customized fixtures were required to support the structures as they were bonded together and shipped to be machined to meet specifications. Once all of the pieces were machined, the final assembly required 240 hours.

“This project is unique in two ways – it marks the first aerospace fuel tank simulation produced through additive manufacturing and is one of the largest 3D printed parts ever built,” stated Joel Smith, strategic account manager for aerospace and defense at RedEye. “Our ability to accommodate such a large configuration and adapt to design challenges on the fly, demonstrates that there really is no limit to the problem-solving potential when you manufacture with 3D printing.”

Lockheed Martin first embraced the design benefits of additive manufacturing with RedEye in 2012 and has invested in in-house 3D printers from RedEye’s parent company, Stratasys. RedEye has worked with Lockheed Martin on various tooling and additive manufacturing projects that support its Space Systems Company. The organizations are expected to partner on more 3D printing projects later this year.

For more information, visit: www.redeyeondemand.com/3d-printing-case-studies/lockheed-martin-3d-printing

Stratasys Ltd. (Nasdaq: SSYS), a leading global provider of 3D printing and additive manufacturing solutions, introduced Endur, an advanced simulated polypropylene material for use with all Objet EdenV, Objet Connex, Objet500 Connex3 and Objet 30Pro 3D Printers.

Endur simulated polypropylene has excellent dimensional stability and a smooth surface finish.

As a durable and flexible addition to Stratasys' growing materials portfolio, Endur offers both high impact resistance and elongation at break, resulting in tough parts. The material also has a heat-deflection temperature up to 129°F / 54°C (HDT @ 0.45MPa per ASTM D-648-06) and has excellent dimensional stability for its material class.

These properties make the new material suitable for a wide range of form, fit and assembly applications, including:

  • Flexible living hinges
  • Moving parts
  • Assembled parts
  • Snap-fit parts such as those used for lids and packaging case applications.

In addition, Endur, which is available in bright white, features an excellent surface finish, for a smooth look and feel. This makes the material well-suited for prototyping household appliances, consumer goods, automotive parts and lab equipment.

"Beta field trials showed high user satisfaction with Endur for models and prototypes of polypropylene parts," says Stratasys product director for materials and applications, Fred Fischer. "During Beta testing, customers testing Endur acknowledged its toughness and flexibility, and they believed the material would address future needs. Due to Endur's excellent simulated polypropylene properties, testing customers were able to address a variety of applications, including moving parts, snap-fit components and small cases and containers."

For more information, visit: www.stratasys.com/materials/polyjet/simulated-polypropylene

Stratasys Ltd. (NASDAQ:SSYS), a leading global provider of 3D printing and additive manufacturing solutions, announced that it has entered into definitive agreements to acquire two privately-held companies, Solid Concepts Inc. and Harvest Technologies. Solid Concepts is the largest independent additive manufacturing service bureau in North America and a fast-growing partner to RedEye, Stratasys' existing digital manufacturing service business. The transactions are expected to be completed early in the upcoming third quarter, subject to customary closing conditions, and are expected to be accretive to Stratasys' Non-GAAP earnings per share within the first 12 months after closing. Upon completion of the transactions, Stratasys will combine Solid Concepts and Harvest Technologies with RedEye to establish one additive manufacturing services business unit. Joe Allison, President of Solid Concepts, will join the Stratasys management team and lead the combined parts business, supported by the strong management teams of Solid Concepts, Harvest Technologies, and RedEye.

Solid Concepts and Harvest Technologies are leading providers of additive manufacturing services. With the addition of Solid Concepts and Harvest Technologies, Stratasys is creating a leading strategic platform focused on meeting customers' additive manufacturing needs through an expanded technology and business offering. Solid Concepts and Harvest Technologies provide Stratasys with significant manufacturing and end-use parts production capabilities, infrastructure, capacity and process knowhow, which are expected to accelerate and enable further adoption of additive manufacturing. The combination of Solid Concepts' deep knowledge of manufacturing and vertical focus, such as medical and aerospace, and Harvest Technologies' experience in parts production, as well as materials and systems knowhow, together with RedEye, strengthens Stratasys' direct digital manufacturing and parts production expertise.

Solid Concepts, based in Valencia, California, is an industry pioneer, having provided additive manufacturing solutions to customers since its founding in 1991. Solid Concepts has developed extensive U.S.-based capacity and infrastructure with six U.S. facilities staffed by approximately 450 employees. Solid Concepts maintains a broad variety of technology platforms and processes for additive manufacturing and serves a diverse customer base across a wide range of verticals, including medical, aerospace, and industrial, among others. Solid Concepts provides an overarching platform that, with the integration of Harvest Technologies and RedEye, is expected to create a comprehensive additive manufacturing solution provider. Solid Concepts generated revenues of approximately $65 million in 2013.

Harvest Technologies, based in Belton, Texas, is a specialty additive manufacturing service bureau established in 1995, with approximately 80 employees. Harvest Technologies has deep manufacturing process knowhow and focuses on advanced end use parts applications. Harvest Technologies was the first additive manufacturing company in North America to become AS9100/ISO 9001 certified, and continues to produce end-use parts for multiple industries.

Under the terms of the definitive agreement with Solid Concepts, Stratasys will acquire Solid Concepts for total consideration of up to $295 million, including a payment on closing of $172 million (or, if settled in cash, part on closing and part six months after closing), deferred payments of $60 million and up to $63 million in retention-related payments. Subject to certain requirements for cash payments, Stratasys retains discretion to settle any of the amounts payable under both the definitive agreement and the retention plan in either Stratasys shares, cash or any combination of the two. The value of a portion of the purchase price as well as the deferred and retention-related payments may increase or decrease in line with the market price of Stratasys shares.

Under the terms of the definitive agreement with Harvest Technologies, Stratasys will acquire Harvest Technologies for an undisclosed amount, including retention-related payments, payable in cash, shares or a combination thereof.

"We are pleased to announce these strategic transactions, which will enable us to provide customers with a comprehensive offering that addresses a broad spectrum of additive manufacturing solutions," said Stratasys CEO David Reis. "With Solid Concepts and Harvest Technologies, together with RedEye, we expect to create a strategic platform to meet our customers' additive manufacturing requirements by significantly expanding our offering, targeting new applications, and strengthening our customer relationships. As our customers' requirements continue to expand, we must evolve to create full service offerings that provide a variety of technologies and custom manufacturing solutions and focus on high-end production applications. Solid Concepts and Harvest Technologies are industry pioneers and innovators in the additive manufacturing space. In acquiring these two unique companies, Stratasys is gaining a broad solutions offering with technologies and decades of application and manufacturing experience which, together with RedEye, are expected to create an industry-leading additive manufacturing and parts production platform."

"These transactions are consistent with our core strategic imperatives and M&A strategy, which is focused on acquiring leading companies to support our goal of continued leadership in the segments in which we operate, as well as reaching new niche verticals," Mr. Reis continued. "We will apply our integration expertise to combine Solid Concepts and Harvest Technologies with our existing RedEye digital manufacturing service business to form a single business unit focused on additive manufacturing services. Importantly, with our shared cultures of innovation and customer service, we believe this will be a smooth transition. We look forward to welcoming the talented teams of Solid Concepts and Harvest Technologies to Stratasys - we are confident we have a very bright future together."

Joe Allison, President of Solid Concepts, said, "We are excited to be joining forces with Stratasys, a global leader in 3D printing and additive manufacturing. As part of a larger company with a broad customer reach and market coverage, Solid Concepts will be even better positioned to meet the significant demand for our additive manufacturing offerings. We look forward to working with Stratasys to ensure a smooth and orderly integration of our businesses."

David K. Leigh, President of Harvest Technologies, said, "We are delighted to join forces with Stratasys and Solid Concepts in a transaction that will enhance Harvest Technologies' leadership in producing end use parts using the most advanced additive manufacturing technologies and processes."

Benefits of the Transaction

  • Creates a leading strategic platform to meet a broad range of customers' additive manufacturing needs. The acquisitions of Solid Concepts and Harvest Technologies provide Stratasys with the ability to offer customers a more comprehensive solution based on multiple technologies that address a broad spectrum of additive manufacturing needs. The combination of Solid Concepts' deep knowledge of manufacturing and vertical focus, such as medical and aerospace, and Harvest Technologies' experience in parts production, as well as materials and systems knowhow, strengthens Stratasys' direct digital manufacturing and parts production expertise.

  • Provides Stratasys opportunities to leverage significant manufacturing services capabilities. With their capacity, knowledge and experience, Solid Concepts and Harvest Technologies are expected to allow Stratasys to expand into a broad range of capabilities and applications expertise across a wide range of new and existing applications. The strong and experienced management teams of Solid Concepts and Harvest Technologies, combined with RedEye, provide deep process knowhow around using additive manufacturing for production applications.

  • Creates opportunity for cross-selling synergies. Once Solid Concepts and Harvest Technologies, together with RedEye, have been integrated into a single business unit, Stratasys will leverage cross sell opportunities that are expected to generate long-term synergies with the company's system business.

  • Compelling financial benefits. Both Solid Concepts and Harvest Technologies have strong financial track records. The transactions are expected to be accretive to Stratasys' non-GAAP earnings per share within the first 12 months after closing.

 

About Stratasys

Stratasys Ltd. (Nasdaq:SSYS), headquartered in Minneapolis, Minn. and Rehovot, Israel, is a leading global provider of 3D printing and additive manufacturing solutions. The company's patented FDM® and PolyJet™ 3D Printing technologies produce prototypes and manufactured goods directly from 3D CAD files or other 3D content. Systems include 3D printers for idea development, prototyping and direct digital manufacturing. Stratasys subsidiaries include MakerBot and Solidscape, and the company operates the RedEye digital-manufacturing service. Stratasys has more than 1800 employees, holds over 550 granted or pending additive manufacturing patents globally, and has received more than 25 awards for its technology and leadership. For more information, visit: www.stratasys.com

About Solid Concepts

Solid Concepts Inc. provides custom manufacturing solutions via additive manufacturing, rapid prototyping, CNC machining, cast urethanes, injection molding and tooling. Since 1991, Solid Concepts has provided engineering expertise from multiple fields to bring success to new products in the aerospace, medical, consumer product industries and more. Capabilities in PolyJet, Stereolithography (SLA), Plastic and Metal Laser Sintering (SLS & DMLS), Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM), QuantumCast™ Cast Urethanes, CNC, Tooling and Injection Molding allow for low to high volume production of plastics, urethanes, and metals directly from design data, resulting in significant time and cost savings. ISO 9001 and AS9100 certifications. For more information, visit: www.solidconcepts.com

About Harvest Technologies

Harvest Technologies was founded by David K. Leigh and, his father, David E. Leigh in 1995. Now with almost 20 years of experience in the additive manufacturing industry, Harvest Technologies runs a fleet of 40 laser sintering (LS/SLS), direct metal laser sintering (DMLS), fused deposition modeling (FDM), and stereolithography (SL/SLA) machines in a cutting-edge 40,000 sq. facility. It is Harvest Technologies' mission to provide top-quality parts and customer service, while continuing to build their reputation as the most valued partner and supplier in the prototype and direct digital manufacturing trades. Harvest Technologies is an AS9100C/ISO 9001:2008 certified supplier. For more information, visit: www.harvest-tech.com

Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

Certain information included or incorporated by reference in this press release may be deemed to be "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Forward-looking statements are often characterized by the use of forward-looking terminology such as "may," "will," "expect," "anticipate," "estimate," "continue," "believe," "should," "intend," "project" or other similar words, but are not the only way these statements are identified. These forward-looking statements may include, but are not limited to, statements relating to the company's objectives, plans and strategies, statements that contain projections of results of operations or of financial condition (including, with respect to the Harvest Technologies and Solid Concepts merger) and all statements (other than statements of historical facts) that address activities, events or developments that the company intends, expects, projects, believes or anticipates will or may occur in the future. Forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and are subject to risks and uncertainties. The company has based these forward-looking statements on assumptions and assessments made by its management in light of their experience and their perception of historical trends, current conditions, expected future developments and other factors they believe to be appropriate. Important factors that could cause actual results, developments and business decisions to differ materially from those anticipated in these forward-looking statements include, among other things: the company's ability to efficiently and successfully integrate the operations of Stratasys, Inc. and Objet Ltd. after their merger as well as the ability to successfully integrate MakerBot, Solid Concepts and Harvest Technologies and other acquired entities into Stratasys; the overall global economic environment; the impact of competition and new technologies; general market, political and economic conditions in the countries in which the company operates; projected capital expenditures and liquidity; changes in the company's strategy; government regulations and approvals; changes in customers' budgeting priorities; litigation and regulatory proceedings; and those factors referred to under "Risk Factors", "Information on the Company", "Operating and Financial Review and Prospects", and generally in the company's annual report on Form 20-F for the year ended December 31, 2013 filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and in other reports that the Company has filed with the SEC. Readers are urged to carefully review and consider the various disclosures made in the company's SEC reports, which are designed to advise interested parties of the risks and factors that may affect its business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. Any forward-looking statements in this press release are made as of the date hereof, and the company undertakes no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by law.

Stratasys, Ltd. (Nasdaq: SSYS) announced the debut of "Gemini", a two-part chaise lounge designed by Neri Oxman, Architect, Designer and Professor of Media, Arts and Science at MIT, in collaboration with Professor W. Craig Carter, Department of Materials Science and Engineering of MIT, using Stratasys' Objet500 Connex3 Color Multi-material 3D Printer and CNC milling by Le Laboratoire.

Conveying the relationship of twins in the womb through material properties and their spatial arrangement, Gemini combines both traditional and innovative manufacturing processes and was unveiled at the "Vocal Vibrations" exhibition at La Laboratoire in Paris, France.

The two piece cocoon-like structure combines subtractive and additive manufacturing and continues Oxman's exploration of the Objet500 Connex3 Color Multi-material 3D Printing technology, which enables a variety of material properties and color combinations to be printed in a single build.

"The twin chaise spans multiple scales of the human existence extending from the warmth of the womb to the stretches of the Gemini zodiac in deep space. It recapitulates a human cosmos, our body, like the constellation, drifting in quiet space. Here the duality of nature is expressed through the combination of traditional materials and state of the art 3D printing," says Oxman. "Stratasys new multi- material color 3D printing capability has allowed me to create a rich dialog between sound and light, rigid and flexible, natural and man-made materials and high and low spatial frequencies in ways that were impossible until now".

In a design commission to explore how materials interact with the human body, the twin chaise features an enclosure which cushions the body within a colored, multi-material 3D printed cocoon, replicating the tranquillity of the womb. A solid wood shell house provides the protective exterior. Lining Gemini from the inside are 44 composite PolyJet digital materials, including color. The 3D printed 'skin' uses Stratasys' unique triple jetting technology and combines three base materials: Stratasys' rubber-like TangoPlus, rigid VeroYellow and VeroMagenta, forming varying shades of transparent and opaque yellows and oranges, in different rigidities. The materials, shapes and surfaces of the 3D printed skin enable a unique vibrational acoustic effect for a quiet calming environment.

"Gemini is fundamentally about the complex and contradictory relationship between twins, which is mirrored in the geometrical forms of the two-part chaise and the dualities that drive their formation, such as the combination of natural and synthetic materials," explains Professor Oxman. "The Objet500 Connex3 Color Multi-material 3D Printer and technology enabled us to print 44 material combinations that not only target specific pressure points on the body to form a sensorial landscape, but also act as a soundproof anechoic chamber, an architecture for quieting the mind."'

Gemini features separate, independent parts that together form an enclosure: Gemini Alpha and Gemini Beta. They are inspired by the mythical relationship between the Dioskouri twins, Castor, born of man (named Gemini Beta after the star in the Northern constellation of Gemini) and Pollux born divine (named Gemini Alpha after the second brightest star in the constellation of Gemini).

In keeping with Greek mythology, the first piece, Gemini Alpha recapitulates the form of a swan, as it is believed that Leda, the twins' mother, became pregnant with Pollux after being seduced by Zeus in the disguise of a swan. Inspired by the lingual root of the word 'swan', "sound" or "to sing," Gemini Alpha includes a sound enclosure featuring a range of Stratasys 3D printed PolyJet digital materials with varying elastic and acoustical properties. Surface features that are more curved than others are assigned more elastic properties thereby increasing sound absorption around local chambers.

"I wanted to reproduce the calming and still ambience of the fetus' prenatal experience," explains Professor Oxman. "The 3D printed sound-proof skin brings the whole concept to life, transporting the visitor once seated within the chaise to ultimate serenity."

Gemini Beta, to be unveiled at the Laboratoire Cambridge exhibition in October 2014, is designed to complete its twin, creating a full enclosure, however it can also function as an independent chaise when positioned upside down.

Commenting on Gemini as a key aspect of Vocal Vibrations, David Edwards, founder and director of Le Laboratoire, Paris, says, "We are delighted to be collaborating with Neri Oxman, whose ground-breaking creations continue to wow audiences while demonstrating the dramatic potential of 3D printing within the design world. In fact, this will be the first time that Le Laboratoire has featured a 3D printed piece and we expect the Gemini chaise will prove to be an attention-grabbing aspect of Vocal Vibrations."

"Once again Professor Neri Oxman has demonstrated her ability to push the boundaries of design and manufacturing with the help of Stratasys color multi-material 3D printing," says Arita Mattsoff, Vice President Marketing for Stratasys. "This is a truly unique, functional piece of art that combines traditional manufacturing techniques with cutting edge 3D printing technology. We are seeing more and more designers embrace 3D printing as a powerful new creative tool, enabling them to bring designs they never thought possible to life in a matter of hours."

For more information, visit: www.lelaboratoire.org/en

Stratasys Ltd. (NASDAQ: SSYS), a manufacturer of 3D printers and materials for personal use, prototyping, and production, announced the launch of the Objet500 Connex3 Color Multi-material 3D Printer.

A game-changer for product design, engineering and manufacturing processes, the Objet500 Connex3 Color Multi-material 3D Printer features a unique triple-jetting technology that combines droplets of three base materials to produce parts with virtually unlimited combinations of rigid, flexible, and transparent color materials as well as color digital materials - all in a single print run. This ability to achieve the characteristics of an assembled part without assembly or painting is a significant time-saver. It helps product manufacturers validate designs and make good decisions earlier before committing to manufacturing, and bring products to market faster.

Engineers at beta user Trek Bicycle in Waterloo, Wisconsin are using the Objet500 Connex3 Color Multi-material 3D Printer for assessment and testing of accessories like bike chain stay guards and handlebar grips prior to actual production. "The Objet500 Connex3 Color Multi-material 3D Printer changed the way we manufacture at Trek, augmenting our traditional, time-consuming CNC processes with fast, iterative and realistic prototyping and functional testing," says Mike Zeigle, manager of Trek's prototype development group.

"Now we produce bicycle parts that look and feel like production parts. We are particularly excited about 3D printing our models directly in color. This gives our designers the ability to graphically display color contact pressure map data on rider contact parts like seats and grips. We are also working on doing the same with FEA & CFD stress data on structural bike components," adds Zeigle.

Similar to a 2D inkjet printer, three color materials - VeroCyan, VeroMagenta and VeroYellow - are combined to produce hundreds of vivid colors. These color materials join Stratasys' extensive range of PolyJet photopolymer materials including digital materials, rigid, rubber-like, transparent, and high temperature materials to simulate standard and high temperature engineering plastics.

The Objet500 Connex3 Color Multi-material 3D Printer also features six palettes for new rubber-like Tango colors, ranging from opaque to transparent colors in various shore values to address markets such as automotive, consumer and sporting goods and fashion.

"Since its introduction in 2007, the Objet Connex Multi-material 3D printing platform has paved the way for the development of advanced 3D printing materials with unique mechanical and thermal properties," says Stratasys VP of product marketing and sales operations Igal Zeitun. "The Objet500 Connex3 Color Multi-material 3D Printer produces models and parts using photopolymers in vivid colors so you can create colorful models from investigating concepts to pre-production pilot runs.

"As the first true multi-purpose 3D printer, we believe the Objet500 Connex3 Color Multi-material 3D Printer is in a league of its own, enabling you to dream up a product in the morning, and hold it in your hands by the afternoon, with the exact intended color, material properties and surface finish."

Ideal for over-molding with Digital ABS and complex multi-material parts, the Objet500 Connex3 Color Multi-material 3D Printer is designed to enable designers, engineers and manufacturers to create models, molds and parts that match the characteristics of production parts. It 3D prints models and parts with the color, durability and surface finish of end products. This includes achieving excellent mechanical properties such as tensile strength, elongation at break, and multiple hardness shore values, which simulate high performance thermoplastics. It also allows overmolding using durable Digital ABS materials and introduces new Shore A values for Digital ABS, ranging from A27 to A95, a major advantage in manufacturing consumer products.

Featuring a large build envelope, the Objet500 Connex3 Color Multi-material 3D Printer is ideal for high capacity production. Print jobs can run with about 30kg of resin per cycle. True to the high resolutions available with PolyJet 3D printing technology, the Objet500 Connex3 Color Multi-material 3D Printer prints as fine as 16 micron layers for models with superior surface finish and ultra-fine detail.

For more information, visit: www.stratasys.com/Objet500Connex3

Tuesday, 03 December 2013 13:02

Stratasys Introduces FDM Nylon 12 Material

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Stratasys Ltd. (Nasdaq: SSYS), a manufacturer of 3D printers and materials, introduced FDM Nylon 12, the first nylon material specifically engineered for the company’s line of Fortus 3D Production Systems.

Stratasys believes that with FDM Nylon 12, its Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) technology creates tougher, more flexible unfilled nylon parts than other additive manufacturing technologies can. FDM Nylon 12 offers up to five times greater resistance to breaking and better impact strength compared to even the strongest FDM materials. The new material’s elongation-at-break specification surpasses that of other 3D printed nylon 12 material by up to 100 percent based on published specifications.  This can create new opportunities for manufacturers in aerospace, automotive, home appliance and consumer electronics to more easily create durable parts that can stand up to high vibration, repetitive stress or fatigue. Examples include end-use parts, like interior panels, covers, environmental control ducting and vibration-resistant components, as well as tools, manufacturing aids, and jigs and fixtures used in the manufacturing process.

“Nylon is one of the most widely used materials in today’s plastic products, and among FDM users it has been one of the top requested materials,” said Fred Fischer, Stratasys materials product director. “It is also the first semi-crystalline material and the toughest material Stratasys has ever offered. We expect it to be used for applications requiring repetitive snap fits, high fatigue endurance, strong chemical resistance, high impact strength or press-fit inserts. This material offers users a clean, simple way to produce nylon parts with an additive process.”

FDM Nylon 12 is available for the Fortus 360, 400 and 900 systems. FDM Nylon 12 is initially offered in black, and is paired with SR110, a new soluble support material optimized for FDM Nylon 12. Support removal requires virtually no labor and is conveniently washed away in the same cleaning agent as other FDM soluble supports.

In other Stratasys news, today the company also introduced Xtend 184 double-capacity canisters for three popular Fortus materials: ABS-M30, Polycarbonate, and UltemTM 9085. Xtend 184 canisters have twice the material capacity in the same size container as current Fortus material canisters. Xtend canisters reduce downtime for canister swapping by enabling up to 100 hours of unattended run-time, which allows weekend builds for extra-large parts.

For more information, visit: www.stratasys.com/materials/fdm/nylon

Stratasys Inc., the North American-based subsidiary of Stratasys Ltd. (Nasdaq:SSYS) announced that it has brought suit for patent infringement against Afinia, a division of Microboards Technology LLC, in the United States District Court for the District of Minnesota. Stratasys is seeking injunctive relief and damages for infringement of four of its 3D printing patents.

The complaint alleges that Afinia’s sale, promotion and use of its Series H printer infringes patents directed to part porosity, liquefier structure, temperature control, and tool paths for constructing part perimeters. The most recent Stratasys patent that Afinia is alleged to infringe was issued in January 2013.

“IP infringement discourages companies from investing in innovation,” said David Reis, Stratasys Ltd. CEO. “Stratasys pioneered 3D printing, and invests millions of dollars each year to develop our technologies. In 2012 alone, Stratasys Ltd invested $33.3 million or 9.3 percent of its revenues in R&D. We intend to protect that investment.”

Stratasys Inc.’s co-founder, chairman and chief innovation officer, Scott Crump, invented Fused Deposition Modeling, a technology that prints three dimensional objects from computer models by building them up in layers. This is the first time that Stratasys has commenced an action for infringement of its patents.

Stratasys Ltd. (Nasdaq: SSYS), headquartered in Minneapolis, Minn. and Rehovot, Israel, manufactures 3D printers and materials for prototyping and production. The company’s patented FDM® and PolyJet® technologies produce prototypes and manufactured goods directly from 3D CAD files or other 3D content. Stratasys subsidiaries include MakerBot and Solidscape, and the company operates the RedEye digital-manufacturing service. Stratasys has more than 1600 employees, holds over 500 granted or pending additive manufacturing patents globally, and has received more than 20 awards for its technology and leadership.

For more information, visit: www.stratasys.com

Thursday, 14 November 2013 18:46

Stratasys Introduces Digital ABS2 Material

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Stratasys Ltd. (Nasdaq: SSYS), a manufacturer of 3D printers and materials for personal use, prototyping, and production, debuted the second generation of its Digital ABS material, named Digital ABS2. The new material, designed for Stratasys PolyJet 3D Printers, is designed to enable users to produce thin-walled models with high dimensional stability. It is now available in ivory in addition to the existing green color.

Enhanced software increases the material’s rigidity, durability and functionality of thin wall elements. This is aimed at improving form, fit, and assembly for prototyping or production applications.

In addition, the material’s rigidity makes it ideal for 3D printing cores and cavities for use in low-volume injection molding applications using thermoplastics. Benefits include sharper edges, which hold up better, and the improved ability to 3D print small parts such as pins and other thin features that are strong enough to handle the high stresses of the injection molding process.

“In addition to general purpose applications, Digital ABS2 is ideal for prototyping consumer electronics and other consumer goods, including small appliances and cell phones, which require high stability with thin-wall geometries,” says Fred Fischer, director of materials and applications product management at Stratasys.

Stratasys PolyJet digital materials are composite materials created by simultaneously jetting two distinct PolyJet materials. The two are combined in specific concentrations and structures to provide unique mechanical properties and to provide a closer look, feel and function to the end-product. Stratasys Digital ABS materials combine high-temperature resistance with enhanced strength and stability to produce models that can sustain high impact.

Digital ABS2 is available for Objet Connex systems.

For more information, visit: www.stratasys.com/materials/polyjet/digital-abs

Stratasys announced the opening of its 2014 Extreme Redesign 3D Printing Challenge. Now in its tenth year, the contest invites students worldwide to submit inventive new product designs, redesigns of existing products, or original or redesigned works of art or architecture. Designs are created on 3D CAD software. Students at the middle school, high school and college level are eligible to participate in the design challenge, and the winning submissions are awarded with scholarship money.

“The Extreme Redesign 3D Printing Challenge not only offers students a chance to win scholarship money by putting their creativity and critical thinking skills to the test,” says Stratasys Executive Vice President of Marketing Jon Cobb, “but it gives the rest of us a glimpse of the exciting possibilities coming from this future generation of inventors, designers and entrepreneurs.”

As in prior years, Stratasys will award the top three student winners in each category either $2,500 or $1,000 scholarships in each of the categories of Middle School and High School Engineering, College Engineering, and Art & Architecture. Designs are awarded based on creativity, usefulness, part integrity and aesthetics. Instructors of the first-place student winner in each category will receive a limited-time demo 3D printer to use in the classroom. Since the contest’s inception, more than $100,000 in scholarships has been awarded to students.

Each submission must:

  • Be a sound mechanical design
  • Be realistic and achievable
  • Include a clear written description of the design

This year’s contest will also feature the bonus award category, “Extreme Sports,” in which students may compete for an additional prize. Students whose designs are intended for use in a sporting activity will have a chance to win a $250 gift card.

For more information or to submit an entry, visit: www.stratasys.com/industries/education/extreme-redesign

Wednesday, 19 June 2013 15:03

Stratasys to Acquire MakerBot

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Stratasys Ltd. (NASDAQ: SSYS) and MakerBot announced the signing of a definitive merger agreement whereby privately held MakerBot has agreed to merge with a subsidiary of Stratasys in a stock-for-stock transaction. MakerBot, founded in 2009, helped develop the desktop 3D printing market and has built the largest installed base of 3D printers in the category by making 3D printers highly accessible. The company has sold more than 22,000 3D printers since 2009. In the last nine months, the MakerBot Replicator 2 Desktop 3D Printer accounted for 11,000 of those sales.

The combination of these two industry leaders is expected to drive faster adoption of 3D printing for multiple applications and industries, as desktop 3D printers are becoming a mainstream tool across many market segments. Upon completion of the transaction, MakerBot will operate as a separate subsidiary of Stratasys, maintaining its own identity, products and go-to-market strategy. The merger enhances Stratasys' leadership position in the rapidly growing 3D printer market, by enabling Stratasys to offer affordable desktop 3D printers together with a seamless user experience. The merger is expected to be completed during the third quarter of 2013; and it is subject to regulatory approvals and other conditions customary for such transactions.

The MakerBot 3D Ecosystem drives the accessibility and rapid adoption of their desktop 3D printers. It includes Thingiverse.com, the largest collection of downloadable digital designs for making physical objects, and which is empowered by a growing community of makers and creators. The MakerBot 3D Ecosystem also includes MakerWare software, MakerCare service, MakerBot Filament, the MakerBot Retail Store, the MakerBot 3D Photo Booth, and strategic partnerships with Autodesk, Adafruit, Nokia, OUYA, MoMA and Amazon. MakerBot recently announced it will further extend its 3D Ecosystem with the MakerBot Digitizer desktop 3D scanner.

MakerBot's products are increasingly used by prosumers, including engineers, designers, architects, manufacturers, entrepreneurs and individuals, for professional purposes, as well as for personal applications. Bre Pettis, CEO and co-founder of MakerBot, will continue to lead the company. Pettis is a leader in the 3D printing industry, with a mission to drive further adoption of the company's products.

"MakerBot's 3D printers are rapidly being adopted by CAD-trained designers and engineers," said David Reis, Stratasys CEO. "Bre Pettis and his team at MakerBot have built the strongest brand in the desktop 3D printer category by delivering an exceptional user experience. MakerBot has impressive products, and we believe that the company's strategy of making 3D printing accessible and affordable will continue to drive adoption. I am looking forward to working with Bre," added Reis.

"The last couple of years have been incredibly inspiring and exciting for us," noted Pettis. "We have an aggressive model for growth, and partnering with Stratasys will allow us to supercharge our mission to empower individuals to make things using a MakerBot, and allow us to bring 3D technology to more people. I am excited about the opportunities this combination will bring to our current and future customers."

Transaction Details

Under the terms of the merger agreement, Stratasys will initially issue approximately 4.76 million shares in exchange for 100% of the outstanding capital stock of MakerBot. The proposed merger has an initial value of $403 million based on Stratasys' closing stock price of $84.60 as of June 19, 2013. MakerBot stakeholders also qualify for performance-based earn-outs that provide for the issue of up to an additional 2.38 million shares through the end of 2014. The proposed earn-out payments have an initial value of up to $201 million based on the Stratasys closing stock price as of June 19, 2013. Those payments, if earned, will be made in Stratasys shares or cash (in an amount reflecting the value of the Stratasys shares that would have otherwise been issued at the relevant earn out determination date), or a combination thereof, at Stratasys' discretion. The merger is expected to accelerate Stratasys' growth rate and be slightly dilutive to Non-GAAP earnings per share in 2013, and accretive to Stratasys' Non-GAAP earnings per share by the end of 2014.

Operating Structure

Stratasys intends for MakerBot to operate as a separate subsidiary, preserving its existing brand, management, as well as the spirit of collaboration it has built with its users and partners. Together with Stratasys, MakerBot will continue to innovate, expand its product offering, provide attentive service to its users and make more 3D printing content available through Thingiverse.com.

Upon completion of the merger, Stratasys and MakerBot will jointly develop and implement strategies for building on their complementary strengths, intellectual property and technical know-how, and other unique assets and capabilities. The opportunities could include accelerating MakerBot's reach by leveraging Stratasys' global infrastructure; cross-promotion of products into the installed base of the combined companies; and leveraging Stratasys' extensive know-how in Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) to benefit MakerBot's product line.

MakerBot Overview

MakerBot reports that during the first quarter of 2013, the company generated $11.5 million in total revenue, compared to $15.7 million for all of 2012. Thingiverse.com, MakerBot's online content portal for the sharing of user-generated digital design content, has more than 90,000 3D product files available for sharing, and generates more than 500,000 unique visitors and 1,000,000 downloads each month. The accessibility and ease-of-use of this 3D printing content helps promote system usage.

A majority of MakerBot's sales are via direct-to-consumer channels on the company's website. MakerBot also sells through distributors outside the U.S. and has the MakerBot store, the first-ever 3D printing retail store, which serves as both a desktop 3D printing demonstration site and brick-and-mortar sales location in New York City.

Desktop 3D Printing Overview

Desktop 3D printer usage among design and engineering professionals is growing rapidly. Stratasys and MakerBot estimate that between 35,000 to 40,000 desktop 3D printers were sold in 2012. This number is estimated to double in 2013, as prosumers increasingly adopt desktop 3D printers for a broad range of applications. Stratasys believes that the unique MakerBot user experience along with the affordability and accessibility of their products, materials and services will help to grow the rate of adoption for desktop 3D printers.

Forward Looking Statement

Certain information included or incorporated by reference in this press may be deemed to be "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Forward-looking statements are often characterized by the use of forward-looking terminology such as "may," "will," "expect," "anticipate," "estimate," "continue," "believe," "should," "intend," "project" or other similar words, but are not the only way these statements are identified. These forward-looking statements may include, but are not limited to, statements relating to the Company's objectives, plans and strategies, statements that contain projections of results of operations or of financial condition and all statements (other than statements of historical facts) that address activities, events or developments that the Company intends, expects, projects, believes or anticipates will or may occur in the future. Forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and are subject to risks and uncertainties. The Company has based these forward-looking statements on assumptions and assessments made by its management in light of their experience and their perception of historical trends, current conditions, expected future developments and other factors they believe to be appropriate. Important factors that could cause actual results, developments and business decisions to differ materially from those anticipated in these forward-looking statements include, among other things: the Company's ability to efficiently and successfully integrate the operations of Stratasys, Inc. and Objet Ltd. after their merger; our ability to obtain the necessary approvals and to satisfy the necessary closing conditions in order to successfully close the acquisition of MakerBot; the overall global economic environment; the impact of competition and new technologies; general market, political and economic conditions in the countries in which the Company operates; projected capital expenditures and liquidity; changes in the Company's strategy; government regulations and approvals; changes in customers' budgeting priorities; litigation and regulatory proceedings; and those factors referred to under "Risk Factors", "Information on the Company", "Operating and Financial Review and Prospects", and generally in the Company's annual report on Form 20-F for the year ended December 21, 2012 filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and in other reports that the Company has filed with the SEC. Readers are urged to carefully review and consider the various disclosures made in the Company's SEC reports, which are designed to advise interested parties of the risks and factors that may affect its business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. Any forward-looking statements in this press release are made as of the date hereof, and the Company undertakes no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by law.

Non-GAAP Discussion Disclosure

The information discussed within this release includes financial projections that are in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (GAAP). In addition, certain non-GAAP financial projections have been provided that exclude certain charges, expenses and income. The non-GAAP measures should be read in conjunction with the corresponding GAAP measures and should be considered in addition to, and not as an alternative or substitute for, the measures prepared in accordance with GAAP. The non-GAAP financial measures are provided in an effort to provide information that investors may deem relevant to evaluate results from the Company's core business operations and to compare the Company's performance with prior periods. The non-GAAP financial measures primarily identify and exclude certain discrete items, such as transaction-related expenses, amortization expenses and expenses associated with share-based compensation required under ASC 718. The Company uses these non-GAAP financial measures for evaluating comparable financial performance against prior periods.

For more information, visit: www.makerbot.com or www.stratasys.com

Stratasys Ltd. (NASDAQ: SSYS), announced the winners of its ninth annual Extreme Redesign 3D Printing Challenge. The global contest encourages students to submit an innovative product design, a redesign of an existing product, or an original work of art or architecture.

First place winner, Art & Architecture category "Emergent Automated Manufacturing" by Connor Nicholas, Savannah College of Art & Design. (Photo: Connor Nicholas)

Stratasys is awarding the top three student winners $2,500 or $1,000 scholarships in each of the categories of Middle and High School Engineering, College Engineering, and Art and Architecture. Instructors of each of the three first-place student winners will receive a tablet PC for use in the classroom.

This year's finalists in the College Engineering category also had their designs examined to see if they had potential for a licensing agreement and commercialization by a manufacturer. This process was done in partnership with online inventor community, Edison Nation, which operates the hit TV show, Everyday Edisons. After considering finalist designs, Edison Nation identified one design submission as having strong potential for submission to the licensing search process and a potential future licensing agreement. The company will recommend steps the entrant should take to pursue this possibility.

Designs are awarded based on creativity, usefulness, part integrity and aesthetics. Each submission is required to be a sound mechanical design, be realistic and achievable and include a clear written description of the design. This year's contest also featured the award category, "Engineering a Difference," in which students competed for a bonus prize. Students whose designs were aimed at solving a great societal challenge had a chance to win a $250 gift card.

Winners were selected by a distinguished panel of independent judges from industry. This year's judges were Patrick Gannon, RP+M division of Thogus, Todd Grimm, TAGrimm & Associates, and Ian Kovacevich, Enventys.

WINNING DESIGNS:

College Engineering Category

1st Crawler 2.0; Andrew Roderick/Brian Booth, Andrews Univ., Berrien Springs, Michigan
2nd Multi-Rack; Sandra Wojtecki/Helena Skonieczna, Ryerson Univ., Toronto, Ontario
3rd Snack Cup; Sivan Arbel/Julia Mozheyko, Ryerson Univ., Toronto, Ontario

Art & Architecture Category

1st Emergent Automated Mfg; Connor Nicholas, Savannah College of Art & Design, Savannah, Georgia
2nd Virtual Organic Glasses; Hichang Ki; IDAS, Seoul, South Korea
3rd Running Charger; Max Meaker, Kentridge H.S., Kent, Washington

Middle/High School Engineering Category

1st Magnesium Fire Starter; Josh Ryan, Grand Haven H.S., Michigan
2nd Math Over All Boundaries; Ethan Koeppe/Ethan McMillan, Grand Haven H.S., Michigan
3rd Easy Open Bottle Cap; Zachary Sia, Pittsford Mendon H.S., Pittsford, New York

Edison Nation Pick

Crawler 2.0; Andrew Roderick, Brian Booth; Andrews Univ; Berrien Springs, Michigan

Edison Nation will advise the team of Roderick and Booth on steps they should take to pursue a possible licensing agreement and commercialization of their invention.

For more information, visit: www.stratasys.com/industries/education/extreme-redesign/winners

Wednesday, 06 March 2013 09:29

3D Printed Cars Edge Closer to Production

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RedEye On Demand, a rapid prototyping and direct digital manufacturing service, and its parent company Stratasys, Ltd. (NASDAQ: SSYS) announced a collaboration with KOR EcoLogic to produce URBEE 2, the first road-ready, fuel-efficient car built using 3D printing, or additive manufacturing, technologies. Targeted to hit the road in two years, URBEE 2 represents a significant milestone in the world of traditional assembly-line manufacturing.
 
“A future where 3D printers build cars may not be far off after all,” said Jim Bartel, Stratasys vice president of RedEye On Demand. “Jim Kor and his team at KOR EcoLogic had a vision for a more fuel-efficient car that would change how the world approaches manufacturing and today we’re achieving it. URBEE 2 shows the manufacturing world that anything really is possible. There are few design challenges additive manufacturing capabilities can’t solve.”
 
The KOR EcoLogic team will fully design URBEE 2 in CAD files, sending them to RedEye On Demand for building through Stratasys’ Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) process. This unique process applies thermoplastics in layers from the bottom up, yielding parts that are durable, precise and repeatable. The finished two-passenger vehicle will comprise 40 large, intricate 3D-printed parts compared to hundreds of parts in the average car. The strong, lightweight vehicle will be designed to go 70 mph on the freeway, using a biofuel like 100 percent ethanol. The goal is for URBEE 2 to drive from San Francisco to New York City on only 10 gallons of fuel, setting a new world record.
 
“As a mechanical engineer, I’ve always believed we could use technology to help us solve some of society’s greatest challenges, like minimizing our dependence on oil and reducing ozone emissions. How cool is it that American manufacturing can evolve to tackle these challenges head-on? Our team is excited to launch URBEE 2, putting a next-generation vehicle on the road that will eventually be sold to the public,” said Jim Kor, president and senior designer for Winnipeg-based KOR EcoLogic.
 
URBEE 2, which stands for urban electric, follows in the tracks of its conceptual predecessor, Urbee 1. Produced in 2011 as a partnership between KOR EcoLogic, Stratasys and RedEye On Demand, Urbee 1 proved that 3D printing could in fact produce large, strong parts that meet accurate specifications of a car body. URBEE 2 will take the basic concepts of Urbee 1 to a higher level, including features like a fully functioning heater, windshield wipers and mirrors.
 
“With the Urbee 1 project, I learned that product design is nearly unencumbered by considerations on how parts can be made with digital manufacturing. That liberation is incredibly powerful and holds a lot of potential for the future of manufacturing,” said Kor.

For more information, visit: www.urbee.net

Stratasys Ltd. (NASDAQ: SSYS), a leading manufacturer of 3D printers and production systems for prototyping and manufacturing, reminds students that just one week remains to submit designs for the 2013 Extreme Redesign 3D Printing Challenge.  As a new incentive this year, college finalists will have their designs reviewed for possible licensing agreement and commercialization by a major manufacturer in partnership with online inventor community, Edison Nation, which operates the hit TV show, Everyday Edisons.

In its ninth year, the contest invites students worldwide to submit inventive new product designs, redesigns of existing products, or original or redesigned works of art or architecture, for a chance to win scholarship money. Students at the middle school, high school and college level are able to participate in the design challenge.

As in prior years, Stratasys will award nine student winners either $2,500 or $1,000 scholarships in the categories of Middle School and High School Engineering, College Engineering, and Art & Architecture. Designs are awarded based on creativity, usefulness, part integrity and aesthetics. Instructors of the three first-place student winners will receive a tablet computer for use in the classroom. Since the contest's inception, more than $100,000 in scholarships has been awarded to students.

Each submission must:

  • be a sound mechanical design
  • be realistic and achievable
  • include a clear written description of the design.

This year's contest will also feature the award category, "Engineering a Difference," in which students may compete for a bonus prize. Students whose designs are aimed at solving a great societal challenge will have a chance to win a $250 gift card.

For more information, visit: www.stratasys.com/extremeredesign

Stratasys announced that its founder and chairman, Scott Crump, has been inducted into IndustryWeek magazine’s Manufacturing Hall of Fame for his work in 3D printing, joining other individuals recognized for their contribution to U.S. manufacturing.

Crump is the inventor of the Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) method of 3D printing, the most widely used additive manufacturing process. Earlier this month, Crump became the chairman of Stratasys Ltd., a new corporate entity formed by the merger of Stratasys Inc. and Objet Ltd.

3D printing (or additive manufacturing) has become more mainstream in the last few years, and although many believe it is a new process, it has existed for 25 years. Formerly called “rapid prototyping,” 3D printing was developed originally for prototyping purposes. However it is now widely used as a manufacturing process for producing finished goods in low volume.

“It’s an honor to be recognized by IndustryWeek for the achievements our team has made,” said Crump. “This recognition demonstrates the impact that 3D printing is having on the manufacturing industry and it portends a bright future for the technology.”

2012 marks the fourth year of IndustryWeek’s Manufacturing Hall of Fame. The publication accepted nominations from its readers and chose ten inductees, including leaders from Boeing Co., Lockheed Martin Corp. and others. Past Honorees include such names as Steve Jobs, Lee Iacocca and Jack Welch. The individuals recognized have a history of significant achievements, and they are examples of character, talent, drive and productive work that resulted in outstanding success in their respective organizations. In general, inductees’ achievements fall into one or more of the following categories:

  • Significantly improving manufacturing efficiency and productivity through their process and/or technology innovations.
  • Creating manufacturing companies — and even entire industries — from the ground up, through their product ideas and/or innovative approaches to doing business.
  • Establishing widely accepted best practices in operational areas such as (but not limited to) management, product development, safety, purchasing, quality, and supply chain and logistics.
  • Setting new standards for manufacturers in areas such as sustainability and corporate responsibility.
  • Revitalizing organizations and operations through continuous improvement efforts and/or innovative business practices.
  • Influencing and supporting as well as advocating for the cause of U.S. manufacturing through their research, writings, activism, policies or thought leadership.

For more information, visit: www.industryweek.com/iw-manufacturing-hall-fame/manufacturing-hall-fame-2012-inductee-scott-crump

3D-printed electronics deliver benefits that mirror those of 3D-printed mechanical parts. Integrate the two processes into one hybrid solution to amplify the advantages in time savings, cost reduction and design flexibility to achieve unmatched efficiencies and create revolutionary products. Join us to discover what is possible when you integrate electro-mechanical design and manufacturing.

Presenters:

Jeff DeGrange, Vice President of New Business Development and Direct Digital Manufacturing, Stratasys
Bill Macy, Application Development Lead, Direct Digital Manufacturing Group, Stratasys

What You Will Learn:

  • How the hybrid process works
  • What types of integrated electronics are possible
  • What are the advantages and considerations
  • What the future holds

Who Should Attend:

  • Electrical & Mechanical Engineers
  • Manufacturing Engineers
  • Test Engineers
  • Design Engineers
  • Engineering Management
  • R&D Professionals

Date/Times:

Tuesday, Dec 18
8:00 pm CST

Wednesday, Dec 19, 2012
8:00 am CST
1:00 pm CST

Duration:

30 minutes

For more information or to register, visit: www.stratasys.com/Resources/Webinars/Smart-Parts.aspx

Wednesday, 05 December 2012 08:35

Sheppard Air Force Base Uses FDM Technology

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Based at Sheppard Air Force Base, Wichita Falls, Texas, the Trainer Development Flight (TDF) is a facility that designs, develops, and manufactures trainers and training aids for the Air Force and all branches of the Department of Defense (DoD) as required. These items are used in numerous training environments, including avionics, weapons and fuel systems, medical readiness, HVAC, and telecommunications systems.

The trainers and training aids may be either original products or replicas of existing ones, depending on the training need. Some devices are not required to be working units, so it usually isn’t cost-efficient to purchase the actual item. For most training applications, it’s more economical to train students on replicas, instead of the often extremely expensive equipment.

The TDF uses direct digital manufacturing to fabricate a wide majority of its training products. To do so, it employs four FDM additive fabrication machines in a centralized location with AFSO 21 (Lean) processes incorporated into the overall process.

Real Challenge

Before adding direct digital manufacturing to its processes, the TDF used conventional manufacturing methods to make its products. Conventional manufacturing typically requires longer lead times because there is often multiple steps, such as machining, lathe work, welding, sheet metal bending and cutting. A similar difficulty occurs when producing tooling to mold a part.

“Because most of our projects are either one-of-a-kind or very low volume, conventional methods become very expensive,” says Mitchell Weatherly, Chief of the TDF. “Only about 10 percent of our work is for prototyping, and 90 percent is production.”

Real Solution

Before settling on FDM, the TDF considered “a multitude” of the other additive processes, says Weatherly. “With FDM, the investment is up front, not ongoing,” he says. “The parts are durable, and they have the high level of detail we require. In addition, the process is environmentally safe and 100% ‘green’ with zero waste.”

The TDF is responsible for designing and manufacturing an exact replica of an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) or “drone” for training repair technicians. It has built a variety of internal and external components using its FDM machines. The components included most of the body components as well as several cowlings, propellers, and antennas. They also purchased a number of real UAV components from the OEM.

Real Benefits

Just for producing the UAV’s large antenna alone, using the FDM machines did the job in about one-tenth the time it would normally have taken with conventional methods, and it delivered an ROI of over $12,000. The savings go beyond time, though. For the antenna, it would have taken an outsourced machine shop up to 20 days to produce the part, where it took only two days using FDM — but only 15 to 20 minutes of labor. For the entire UAV project there was a total time saved of more than 3 years in some areas. This project, along with other trainer savings has been very impressive with an $800,000 cost avoidance over the last four years.

“Major advantages to the FDM system include its speed over other processes or alternative build methods, the versatility of FDM versus injection molding, and the ability to run multiple parts simultaneously through the system,” says Weatherly. Benefits include ease of maintenance, as well as the availability to use multiple materials for a variety of purposes. “Additional capabilities include the ability to design based on function needs instead of manufacturing constraints, and the ability to implement design changes immediately and at minimal costs. The versatility to manufacture any item coupled with zero hazardous waste is one of the greatest advantages to the Air Force,” says Weatherly. ”The FDM-based machines have been used for a number of trainer projects which have tight budgets. We have also utilized the FDM process for research and development for our airmen and soldiers to be able to train like we fight.

“For our first FDM machine purchase, we projected ROI in 4 years, but it took only 18 months,” Weatherly says. “For our second FDM machine purchase we saw ROI in only 9 months. You will never get away from conventional methods and highly skilled technicians, but you can give them the proper tools and new technology that can make their job easier and competitive. I believe FDM is one of the technologically advanced premier manufacturing methods available. Since 2004, when we purchased our first of four machines, the FDM process has saved the government over $3.8 million to date with an expected 10-to-15-year savings of over $15 million. “

[Editors’ Note: The TDF (Trainer Development Flight) has won the 2008 Air Force Chief of Staff Team Excellence Award for its use of FDM technology and other advanced production methods. It is recognized as the premier center of excellence for manufacturing trainers and training aid products for the Air Force and other required Department of Defense agencies.]

For more information, visit: www.stratasys.com

Monday, 03 December 2012 08:55

Stratasys and Objet Complete Merger

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Stratasys, Inc. (NASDAQ: SSYS) and Objet Ltd. today announced the completion of their merger, forming a leader in 3D printing and direct digital manufacturing. The combined company will trade on the NASDAQ stock exchange as Stratasys Ltd. ("Stratasys") under the symbol SSYS beginning December 3, 2012. Based on the closing price of Stratasys, Inc. stock on November 30, 2012, the market capitalization of the new company will be approximately $3.0 billion.

Stratasys boasts an impressive portfolio of 3D printing and direct digital manufacturing solutions, with systems that produce parts with a wide range of capabilities and materials. The company will offer three leading technologies: FDM® for functional prototypes and production parts; inkjet-based PolyJet® for prototyping parts with high feature detail and fine surface finish; and Solidscape® Drop-on-Demand ("DoD") thermoplastic ink-jetting technology for complex wax patterns for investment casting of finished parts. With more than 260 channel partners around the world, Stratasys can leverage the extensive geographic reach of its marketing and sales organization to serve customers and grow awareness of 3D printing for rapid prototyping and production. In addition, Stratasys will have a world-class R&D team focused on developing new consumables and systems.

David Reis, chief executive officer of Stratasys, stated, "We are excited to move forward as one company and deliver the benefits this combination creates for our shareholders, our customers and our employees. Stratasys is now uniquely positioned to offer a comprehensive portfolio of innovative products and technologies, and we have the scale, team and financial strength to achieve our goals. I look forward to working closely with the board of directors, our senior management team and all of our employees to ensure a seamless transition as we continue to deliver advanced solutions to our customers worldwide."

"We are pleased to announce the successful completion of this merger," said Scott Crump, full-time executive chairman of Stratasys. "With our breadth of products, commitment to innovation, and outstanding, service-focused team, we will be well positioned to address customer needs across the entire 3D design and manufacturing spectrum. The combined company has a deep well of talent and a strong board and management team to lead us successfully as we continue to pave a new way forward for the 3D printing industry."

Transaction Information

Consistent with the terms of the transaction, which was announced on April 16, 2012, Stratasys, Inc. has merged with a subsidiary of Objet, each former Stratasys common share has been converted into the right to receive one newly issued ordinary share of Stratasys Ltd., and Objet has changed its name to Stratasys Ltd. Former Stratasys stockholders hold approximately 55 percent of the combined company's common stock, and former Objet shareholders hold approximately 45 percent on a fully diluted basis using the treasury stock method. Stratasys is maintaining dual headquarters in Eden Prairie, Minnesota and Rehovot, Israel, and is incorporated in Israel.

Financial Benefits of the Transaction

The transaction is expected to create significant revenue synergies from increased sales, and to be accretive to non-GAAP earnings per share immediately. Beginning 18 months after closing, Stratasys expects to be generating between $7 and $8 million of annual net cost synergies and between $3 and $4 million in annual tax savings.

Leadership

David Reis, former chief executive officer of Objet, has assumed the role of chief executive officer; Erez Simha, former chief operations officer and chief financial officer of Objet, has assumed the role of chief operations officer (IL) and chief financial officer; Scott Crump, co-founder and former chief executive officer of Stratasys, Inc., has become full-time executive chairman of the board; and Elchanan Jaglom, formerly chairman of Objet, is serving as the full-time chairman of the executive committee.

Integration

Stratasys management will immediately begin the process of fully integrating the two companies, and the company has formed an executive committee comprised of four members of the board of directors to oversee the integration process. In the near term, customers can expect to work with each company as they always have, and in the coming months, will have the ability to purchase both Stratasys and Objet products from one channel partner point of contact.

Advisors

Piper Jaffray & Co. acted as financial advisor to Stratasys and the firms McLaughlin & Stern, LLP, Richards, Layton & Finger, P.A., Latham & Watkins LLP, and Fischer Behar Chen Well Orion & Co. acted as its legal advisors. J.P. Morgan Securities LLC acted as financial advisor to Objet and the firms Meitar Liquornik Geva & Leshem Brandwein and Cooley LLP acted as its legal advisors.

For more information, visit: www.stratasysfora3dworld.com

Increasing the number of manufacturing tools like jigs, fixtures and organizational aids, improves efficiency, capacity, unit cost and responsiveness. Using additive manufacturing (or 3D printing) to produce these tools makes them more accessible and quicker to implement. The result is more manufacturing aids where they previously didn't exist. Savings can be so high that they can easily justify the purchase of an additive manufacturing system in far less time than expected.

Presenter:
Todd Grimm — T. A. Grimm & Associates, Inc.

What You Will Learn:

  • Why easy access to manufacturing tool production leads to profit gains
  • Why improving production efficiencies with additive manufacturing is nearly risk-free
  • How to easily and inexpensively increase the use of manufacturing tools
  • How Digi International, rp+m and Oreck put tools to work in their operations

Who Should Attend:

  • Manufacturing engineers
  • Production Managers
  • Test Engineers
  • CFOs, Controllers & other financial managers
  • Buyers

Dates/Times:
Thursday, Nov 15, 2012 1:00 pm CST
Tuesday, Nov 20, 2012 8:00 pm CST
Wednesday, Nov 21, 2012 8:00 am CST

Duration:
30 minutes

For more information or to register, visit: www.stratasys.com/Resources/Webinars/Payback-Time-jigsfixtures.aspx

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