Laser Institute of America

Laser Institute of America (38)

Laser Institute of America (LIA), the professional society for lasers, laser applications and laser safety worldwide, announces that registration is now open for the 2017 International Congress on Applications of Lasers & Electro-Optics (ICALEO®) Conference.

Held this year from October 22-26 at the Sheraton Atlanta Hotel in Atlanta, Georgia, the 36th edition of the conference continues its legacy as the leading source of technical information in the laser industry, dedicated to the field of laser materials processing. The conference allows researchers and end-users to meet and review the best in the business, while presenters at the conference will be given the opportunity to have their technical papers peer-reviewed.

The blind peer-review panel will focus on the quality, relevance, and significance of the research and findings. Selected papers will be recognized in the ICALEO 2017 Congress Proceedings and subsequently published in the Journal of Laser Applications (JLA).

Each year, ICALEO attracts more than 200 companies and organizations from more than 30 countries. With more than 20 vendors currently scheduled for this year’s conference, LIA’s unique Laser Industry Vendor Program allows vendors and attendees the opportunity to discuss the latest equipment and applications in a low-key setting after the technical sessions. With no conflicting session scheduled during this time slot, participants can commit their full attention to vendors.

ICALEO also offers sponsorship opportunities, acknowledging sponsors through onsite signage, visibility on the website, and inclusion in the distributed program. Attendees will have the opportunity to experience the most-current products and services from the leading industry exhibitors and sponsors.

This year’s conference chair members include:

  • Congress General Chair: Christoph Leyens, Fraunhofer IWS
  • Laser Materials Processing Chair: Klaus Kleine, Coherent Inc.
  • Laser Microprocessing Co-Chair: Michelle Stock, mlstock consulting
  • Laser Microprocessing Co-Chair: Cather Simpson, University of Auckland
  • Nanomanufacturing Conference Chair: Yongfeng Lu, University of Nebraska-Lincoln


In keeping with tradition, the 2017 edition of ICALEO brings together academics and laser industry professionals and allows them a space to discuss the advancement of laser technology and encourage its successful reach into the future.

Tuesday, 27 December 2016 11:25

LAM 2017 - Laser Additive Manufacturing Workshop

Written by

Laser Institute of America (LIA) will host its annual Laser Additive Manufacturing Workshop (LAM®) February 21-22, 2017 in Houston, Texas. As LAM returns to Houston, a brand new set of Workshop Chairs will drive LAM’s focus on leading edge additive processes and their process chain integration by telling success stories of real world industrial applications.

Milan Brandt of RMIT University will lead LAM 2017 as the General Chair, with John Hunter of LPW Technology, Inc. and Minlin Zhong of Tsinghua University serving as the Workshop’s Co-chairs.

As the economy grows so does the need for additive manufacturing and LAM aims to facilitate this growth by encouraging networking and educational opportunities in various industries for anyone interested in utilizing this new laser technology.

"Laser additive manufacturing is now the fastest growing sector of manufacturing globally because of the many benefits the technology offers compared to the traditional subtractive methods,” said Brandt. “LAM 2017 will provide an opportunity for national and international practitioners to discuss and explore challenges and progress in additive technology and applications from design to manufacture in the context of defense, aerospace and medical applications."

LAM focuses on a significant number of additive manufacturing applications, with representation from over a dozen industries involved with this technology. You will hear from companies like Siemens, Stryker and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that maintain marketplace influence internationally in countries like Australia, China and Germany.

A rapidly rising area of laser manufacturing is micro/nano laser additive manufacturing. The 2017 workshop will introduce a new, can’t miss session covering the latest in this emerging area.

Other sessions include:

  • Trends in Laser Additive Manufacturing led by an invited keynote from GE
  • Additive Manufacturing Technology led by keynote presentation from Wayne King of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
  • Designs and Structures for Additive Manufacturing
  • Materials for Additive Manufacturing and more


Following presentations on day one, LIA will give attendees the opportunity to network with experienced laser-industry professionals at the Exhibitor Reception.

“This isn’t just a workshop,” said Jim Naugle, Marketing Director with LIA. “This is an opportunity to establish lifelong business relationships with experts in their respective fields. Our goal is for attendees to leave with more than business cards, we want them to leave with business partners.”

Alabama Laser returns as the Platinum Sponsor for LAM 2017. Other sponsors include Fraunhofer USA - CLA, IPG Photonics Corporation, Laserline Inc., LPW Technology, Inc., Optomec, OR Laser Technology, Inc. and TRUMPF Inc.

Registration for LAM is now open. For more information or to register, visit www.lia.org/lam

Wednesday, 06 July 2016 16:56

LIA’s 2016 ICALEO Laser Research Conference

Written by

Registration is now open for Laser Institute of America (LIA)’s 2016 International Congress on Applications of Lasers & Electro-Optics (ICALEO®), to be held this year from October, 16-20 at the Sheraton® San Diego.

ICALEO, which bears a 34 year history as the most comprehensive spotlight on laser research and state-of-the-art laser materials processing, will provide both veteran and newcomer industry attendees with unbeaten opportunities to explore and connect at several networking events. Attendees will also have a chance to review the latest technology and research leading to advanced manufacturing applications in medicine, transportation, energy, communications and defense.

From the popular Welcome Reception, to the President’s Reception, Laser Industry Vendor Reception, and the esteemed LIA Annual Meeting & Awards Luncheon, ICALEO 2016 continues its tradition of connecting the laser industry and showcasing speakers who are afforded the opportunity to have their paper peers reviewed, thus lending even more authority to their work. Three students will have the opportunity to be acknowledged with the 18th annual Student Paper Award. The award winners will be announced during the Closing Plenary Session on Thursday. ICALEO’s Poster Presentation Gallery will be featured throughout the conference, with poster presenters available on Wednesday morning to answer questions and present their research. Awards will also be presented to 1st, 2nd and 3rd place winners.

This year’s conference is again chaired by Silke Pflueger of DirectPhotonics, ICALEO’s first female congress general chair, who heads back this year to the town where she attended her first ICALEO.

“From my beginnings as session chair and chair of short courses at that first ICALEO in San Diego, to my arrival back in 2016 as congress general chair of the event, it’s clear that my time at ICALEO has been worthwhile!” she recounted. “Just as I was pushed further, and was helped to better understand what I am doing from the veteran attendees, I witness every year how ICALEO grows laser leaders like me. I hope my story encourage lots of new people – and young people – to come and join us.”

ICALEO program chair members include:

  • Laser Materials Processing Conference: Christoph Leyens, Fraunhofer IWS
  • Laser Microprocessing Conference: Michelle Stock, mlstock consulting
  • Nanomanufacturing Conference: Yongfeng Lu, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Business Forum and Panel Discussion: Klaus Löffler, TRUMPF Laser and Systems GmbH


Exhibiting sponsors include:

  • Platinum sponsor: IPG Photonics Corporation
  • Gold sponsors: Edgewave GmbH Innovative Laser Solutions, SPI Lasers, TRUMPF Inc.
  • Silver sponsors: Laserline Inc, Light Conversion Ltd, Lumentum
  • Bronze sponsor: Spectra-Physics, A Newport Company


“From men and women who are interested in the fundamentals of the interaction between a laser beam and a material, to those interested in how a process can be integrated and optimized for an application, ICALEO brings the academics and industrials together to improve and inspire laser technology,” Pflueger added. “It’s a pretty special event, unlike any other I’ve attended.”

Combining the latest thought leadership in laser materials processing, laser microprocessing and nanomanufacturing with informed predictions on where the future of lasers will lead, LIA’s ICALEO 2016 is the premier source of technical information in the field.

For more information or to register, visit: www.icaleo.org

LIA lifetime member and industrial laser applications pioneer David Belforte will provide the leading keynote address, a comprehensive overview of the industrial laser market, to kick off the fifth annual Lasers for Manufacturing Event® (LME®), at 11:00 AM on April 26 in Atlanta, GA.

Belforte, Editor-in-Chief of Industrial Laser Solutions, who is responsible for introducing high power laser cutting in the United States, has drawn standing-room only crowds at LME in the past. His keynote addresses provide a crucial connection to the real-world applications of the devices and laser systems that attendees will see in the exhibit hall of the Cobb Galleria Centre, and cover various facets of the industrial laser market, like energy generation, medical applications, electronic devices, agriculture, automotive, aerospace and aviation.

“The Lasers for Manufacturing Event is the premier opportunity for manufacturing professionals to explore the laser industry and identify exactly where the innovation and application activity lies today and beyond,” Belforte said. “The breadth of the value of the information at LME empowers anyone in the industry, from the major laser makers to the small job shops, to harness the power of lasers to increase output for their clients.”

Belforte’s data-packed presentation will provide a global overview of several different types of lasers’ roles, and will spotlight this year’s market outlook to define trends and showcase opportunities for the future of lasers in manufacturing.

Advanced manufacturing technology expert and EWI Additive Manufacturing Consortium Director Dr. Shawn Kelly will also provide a keynote address on Laser Technology and Metal Additive Manufacturing at the 2016 Lasers for Manufacturing Event® (LME®), beginning at 2:15 PM on April 26 at the Cobb Galleria Centre in Atlanta, GA.

Dr. Kelly, whose expertise resides in metal additive manufacturing (AM), material science and metallurgy, will present LME attendees with the truths and myths involved in the additive manufacturing of metal products. The current and future role of laser technology, a key reason for metal AM’s sustained growth, will also be discussed.

“3D printing, and to a lesser extent, additive manufacturing, are now part of the household lexicon; however, these two terms do not have the same meaning,” said Dr. Kelly. “It’s important to bust the variety of myths about the additive manufacturing of metals, especially as they apply to laser technology.”  Many of the same technical challenges facing the adoption of laser technology in manufacturing are also encountered in additive manufacturing. Dr. Kelly will present areas where AM can inform the laser community at large.

For more information, visit: www.laserevent.org

Automotive industry leader Ralf Kimmel will provide a keynote address on Laser Applications in Automotive Manufacturing on day two of this year’s Lasers for Manufacturing Event® (LME®), April 26-27, at the Cobb Galleria Centre in Atlanta, GA.

Kimmel, an automotive industry business development leader at Germany’s TRUMPF, a leading worldwide manufacturer of fabricating equipment and industrial laser technology, will address the integration of innovative, cost-efficient production processes and the use of new materials in the auto industry — all enabled by laser technology.

“Light as a tool in manufacturing cars is an established medium for a wide range of applications; at the same time, laser technology is a guarantor for innovation and enables the development of new car technologies,” Kimmel said. “Although these innovations are happening at different levels, lasers are the missing element that we can incorporate for present and future industry growth and success.”

Kimmel will touch on the choice of material and production methods of today’s automobiles, which, as Kimmel mentioned, lead to new challenges and opportunities for lasers in joining processes. Various application examples will be shown, like a new laser brazing technology, welding of copper with new lasers at green wavelengths, and black laser marking, without any susceptibility to corrosion.

Kimmel’s keynote address will be one of four unique educational presentations at the fifth annual LME. This year’s conference in the heart of the Southeast will feature the latest trending topics in 3D printing, additive manufacturing, cutting, welding, drilling and marking.

For more information or to register, visit: www.lia.org/conferences/laserevent

The Laser Institute of America (LIA) will host their annual Laser Additive Manufacturing (LAM®) Workshop on March 2-3 in Orlando, FL. The two-day event will focus on ‘why lasers?’ in the flourishing field of additive manufacturing. There will be fascinating keynotes, sessions, exhibits and networking opportunities taking place during the workshop, as well as a line-up of notable speakers and industry experts. LIA’s 2016 LAM workshop is a must-attend event for professionals involved in manufacturing of complex, lightweight, metal and other structural materials.

Paul Denney, General Chair of LAM 2016, along with his Co-Chairs Ingomar Kelbassa and Jim Sears, have designed this year’s program around analyzing how people are using additive manufacturing, and where, when and why lasers are the best solution compared to other technologies.

“We are hoping this year’s workshop will help attendees better understand the pros and cons of laser-based additive manufacturing over the other technologies. Hopefully it will also provide direction to those looking to improve on the status of the laser additive manufacturing and what technologies need to be developed and/or improved upon,” said Denney. The program will provide an overview on the many diverse options that are available today to create formed parts, which ones to choose and why you should choose them.

The first day of the workshop will begin with a keynote by Professor Sudarsanam Suresh Babu of The University of Tennessee at Knoxville, presenting Recent Advances in Metal Additive Manufacturing at Manufacturing Demonstration Facility: Role of in-situ Process Monitoring, Computational Modeling, and Advanced Characterization. Following the keynote, speakers will come from companies involved in alternative technologies and laser additive manufacturing, including companies using gas metal arc welding (GMAW), ultrasonic welding and electron beams. Sessions on the latest in additive equipment directly from major manufacturers, including Concept Laser and Optomec, Inc., are also on the program. After a session on new additive approaches from academia and industry experts, the first day will conclude at the Exhibitor Happy Hour Reception, an excellent networking event.

‘Bridging the gap’ of laser additive manufacturing from research to application will be the theme for the second day of the workshop. Staring off, a keynote address by Professor David Bourell of The University of Texas at Austin, Director of the Laboratory for Freeform Fabrication, will discuss the current status of additive manufacturing. Afterwards, the morning sessions will provide insights from government, corporate and academic labs and how they are taking their work from the lab to the factory floor. The afternoon will discuss job shops and their use of additive manufacturing for their customers. These topics will fascinate those who may be interested in developing prototypes and production parts using additive manufacturing processes, but unsure where to begin. The workshop will wrap up with a session on the latest in process monitoring and control, two of the essential aspects to developing robust manufacturing processes.

Peter Baker, LIA’s executive director, is excited about this year’s workshop, stating “Now in its 8th year, LAM has become a premier event in the additive manufacturing arena. We are grateful to the contributors and sponsors who create this valuable workshop.”

With growing interest in additive manufacturing, based on maturing technologies and processes, this is an excellent time to educate, network and benchmark laser additive manufacturing against other technologies. Users from diverse industries such as oil and gas, aerospace, agriculture automotive, defense, marine, transportation, power generation, construction and tool and die, can all benefit from the knowledge gained at LAM.

For more information or to register, visit: www.lia.org/lam

Advanced manufacturing with lasers will be showcased at the Laser Institute of America’s fifth Lasers for Manufacturing Event® (LME®) held at the Cobb Galleria Centre April 26-27 in Atlanta, Georgia.

The move of LME to the Southeast from its former home in Schaumburg, IL, “is intended to bring this unique lasers-only event closer to a new group of manufacturers who stand to benefit greatly from the real-world market information we provide — in an environment exclusively populated by top-tier laser equipment suppliers and customers who are ready to buy,” explained LIA Executive Director Peter Baker.

Longtime laser industry consultant Rob Mueller, who has overseen the LME Ask the Expert booth, is spearheading the educational program. LME offers several tracks, from entry-level presentations and overview tutorials to more advanced topics and selected keynote addresses.

Topics for LME 2016 include:

  • Beam delivery concepts
  • Laser marking
  • Advances in laser cutting
  • Applications for laser micromachining
  • The fundamentals of laser welding
  • Tutorials on laser-based additive manufacturing, as well as process monitoring and quality control
  • Keynotes including the traditional industrial laser market overview by past LIA President David Belforte, as well as state-of-the industry talks on direct-to-metal 3D printing and laser applications in automotive manufacturing
  • The long-standing “101-level” courses on types of lasers and laser systems, the safe use of those lasers and the economic justification for using lasers


LME offers numerous opportunities for access to major laser industry players, including representatives from Laser Mechanisms, LaserStar Technologies, IPG Photonics, TRUMPF, Coherent, Directed Light, Laserline, Laservision, Cambridge Technology, Haas Laser Technologies and many more.

“I have gotten business out of LME that I probably would not otherwise have gotten,” notes Ron Schaeffer, CEO of PhotoMachining in Pelham, N.H. “LIA makes things very easy as far as customer access. This is a very intimate conference — that is one of its benefits.”

For the second year in a row, LME will be preceded by LIA’s Lasers for Manufacturing Summit on April 25th at the Renaissance® Atlanta Waverly Hotel in Atlanta, Georgia. This event will again give executives an intensive introduction to what lasers can do in big-ticket industries. A panel of noted laser industry market experts will provide detailed views of various global laser markets and profit opportunities.

“We want to help executives by giving them an overview and a perspective about how lasers are affecting various manufacturing markets, then give them a top-level view of the major technologies and where they’re being applied,” Baker said. “The purpose is to help them plan to incorporate lasers in their production setup so they don’t get left behind and remain competitive.”

For more information, visit: www.lia.org/conferences/laserevent

Friday, 20 February 2015 16:22

LAM 2015 to Feature 24 Presentations

Written by

With all the hype out there about additive manufacturing, it's time you entered the hype-free zone and got the real scoop on laser-based industrial additive manufacturing. From powders to process chain, learn from some of the top minds in the arena at our seventh Laser Additive Manufacturing Event in Orlando on March 4-5.

LAM 2015 will give you the big picture: advanced AM systems like laser material deposition and direct metal selective laser melting; automotive, aerospace, medical and energy applications; the latest cladding and corrosion repair methods; global perspectives on AM initiatives; and visions for more radical AM applications.

With representatives from major players like GE Global Research, BMW, Siemens and America Makes, LAM 2015 promises an advanced and realistic look at AM technology and market opportunities.

Chaired by Dr. Ingomar Kelbassa — part of the Fraunhofer ILT team that won an Aviation Week innovation award in 2012 — LAM 2015 is the place to be to network with experts on the cutting edge of this manufacturing revolution. Don't be left behind — register for LAM 2015 today.

Speakers Include:

  • Christoph Leyens - Fraunhofer IWS
  • James Sears - GE Global Research Center
  • Daniel Schraknepper - Fraunhofer IPT
  • John Hunter - LPW Technology Inc.
  • Jannis Kranz - Laser-Zentrum Nord GmbH
  • Satyajeet Sharma - Oerlikon Metco
  • Harald Lemke - NanoSteel Company
  • Thomas Schopphoven - Fraunhofer ILT
  • Stefan Mann - Fraunhofer ILT
  • Max Schniedenharn - Fraunhofer ILT
  • Paul Denney - Lincoln Electric Company
  • Richard Grylls - Optomec
  • Sebastian Kaufmann - Trumpf Laser- & Systemtechnik GmbH
  • Henner Schöneborn - SLM Solutions
  • Wayne Penn - Alabama Laser
  • James McGuffin-Cawley - Case Western Reserve University
  • Milan Brandt - RMIT University
  • Tim Biermann - Fraunhofer ILT
  • Craig Bratt & Aravind Jonnalagadda - Fraunhofer CLA
  • Andre W.M. Jansen - Plating Solutions B.V.
  • Jim Cann - Rofin-Sinar, Inc.
  • Allister James - Siemens Energy Inc.
  • Daniel Hayden - Hayden Corporation
  • Bill Shiner - IPG Photonics, Inc.
  • Wolfgang Thiele - BMW Group
  • Bruce Colter - Linear Mold and Engineering

For more information or to register, visit: www.lia.org/conferences/lam

The Laser Institute of America (LIA)’s annual workshop on laser additive manufacturing moves to LIA’s hometown of Orlando on March 4-5 at the Embassy Suites – Lake Buena Vista South (Orlando, FL) for the first time in 2015. Held at Florida’s high-tech corridor, LAM promises another no-hype look at the disruptive power of additive processes.

Chaired by Dr. Ingomar Kelbassa, the seventh Laser Additive Manufacturing (LAM®) Workshop will focus heavily not only on traditional laser-based cladding applications to prevent or repair corrosion and wear, but also on the process chains vital to optimizing the additive production of parts.

While rapid prototyping with plastic or metal powders is well-established, Kelbassa is among those on the cutting edge of additively producing functional industrial parts. The adjunct professor at Australia’s RMIT University, vice director at the Chair for Laser Technology LLT, RWTH Aachen University and department head at the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology, Kelbassa was also a member of the Fraunhofer ILT team that won an Aviation Week innovation award in 2012 for producing an additively manufactured BLISK (blade-integrated disk) in about 160 minutes — about two minutes per blade.

“We have developed and improved from 2D cladding to 2.5D cladding to 3D cladding and layer-by-layer buildup of structures as well as all the developments and improvements in the powder-bed processes, (also known as) selective laser melting,” Kelbassa says.

“Primarily, LAM was, is and will be a workshop that is industry driven,” he asserts. “Therefore, the majority of the presentations will be on success stories from OEMs as well as from a service provider's perspective — highlighting industrially implemented additive manufacturing (AM) chains in the aeronautics, power generation, offshore, mining, oil, automotive and tool, die and mold-making fields.”

In keeping with prior LAM education tracks, LAM 2015 will feature an overarching theme each day: process chain and process integration on day one, and real-world success stories on day two.

Day one is scheduled to feature four sessions with three presentations each addressing the paradigm shift in manufacturing – along the horizontal and vertical AM process chain; design and material; process and quality assurance; and systems and process integration. Day two “will feature a more industrially driven telling of success stories in different markets and fields of applications.” He calls the last slate of presentations “visions, because hopefully (we will have a talk) on rapid manufacture of organic materials: not metals or ceramics, but depositing living cells. In the end, the vision is to print out ‘spare parts’ for human beings.”

While industrial additive manufacturing might be confusingly lumped in with the broad spectrum of emerging 3D printing options — particularly vis-à-vis the cheaper personal-style systems for making plastic trinkets — achieving a global perspective on real LAM growth is challenging. That’s where LAM fills a significant need. Kelbassa says:

“At the moment, AM is a niche. But it will be growing. It will not entirely replace subtractive manufacture; it can’t. But in the end there will be a larger divergence (in applications) and also larger technology transfer in different fields of applications. Where we come from now is (using AM for) high-value components (for) aerospace, power generation, automotive, highly complex parts for tool, die and mold making and highly individual parts for mass customization — mainly in medicine such as for (dental) implants etc.”

LIA will ensure a chance to network by scheduling an exhibitor reception starting at 5 p.m. on March 4. Attendees can ask their most pressing questions of some of the most experienced laser-industry professionals, including LAM co-chairs Jim Sears of GE and Paul Denney of Lincoln Electric — both past chairs of LAM. Alabama Laser will once again serve as platinum sponsor of the workshop. Other Sponsors this year include: Cambridge Technology, Inc.; DM3D Technology, LLC; Fraunhofer USA, CCL; IPG Photonics Corporation; Joining Technologies, Inc.; Laserline Inc.; LPW Technology; Optomec and TRUMPF Inc. A complete list of LAM 2015 Exhibitors can be found on the LAM website.

For more information or to register, visit: www.lia.org/lam

The fourth annual LME was another exciting event full of informative educational courses and laser vendors with offerings on a wide range of laser related products. Laser experts, business professionals and representatives of the industry curious about laser manufacturing gathered for LME 2014 at the Schaumburg Convention Center in Schaumburg, IL from Sept. 23 -24, 2014.

The excitement kicked off a day prior at LIA’s inaugural Lasers for Manufacturing Summit, which sought to inform participants on the global climate for lasers in manufacturing. C-suite and other top executives attended two keynotes: one on the economic outlook of the laser manufacturing industry, and one which provided a glimpse into the state of additive manufacturing and 3D printing. Following these keynotes was a presentation on AM at GE Global Research: its opportunities and challenges, and a presentation on ultrafast lasers, highlighting the market implications for their growing use. The education track at the Summit brought insight to the worldwide emerging markets, potential benefits of laser processes, and the future of laser technology.

Participants continued to seek answers to their manufacturing needs at the five-member panel of laser experts following the presentations. A question and answer dialogue was conducted with attendees to great success. The panel spoke on the current cultural climate in regards to the shortage of skilled labor available in the manufacturing industry, as well as the programs in place nationwide that are working to fill this gap.

After the panel discussion, a VIP reception was held, where high-level executives and presenters could meet and mingle in a more casual environment. This provided the perfect networking opportunity for attendees.

Anyone with an interest in expanding their manufacturing processes to include lasers could discuss with like-minded exhibitors the benefit their product would serve. On the LME exhibit floor, managers and key decision makers from manufacturing firms big and small stopped at various booths and spoke with the exhibiting companies.

With nine live lasers at this year’s LME, attendees experienced firsthand the laser systems and products of which they had come to learn. New LME exhibitors such as DPSS Lasers Inc. and Innovar Systems Limited brought live laser marking machines. DPSS Lasers Inc. drew a crowd by demonstrating their laser marking abilities by marking pens with attendees’ names on them as giveaways. Longtime LME exhibitors Rofin-Sinar Inc. and LaserStar Technologies showcased their laser welding machines. Other live lasers at LME this year covered cutting and engraving applications.

Andrew Wellons, manager of industrial sales for Gravotech, a new-comer at the LME exhibit hall spoke of his interaction: “The people we have talked to have had real interest in projects. Obviously [LME] is laser-focused, so expect to be talking to people who are very well versed in, and focused on lasers. There was some downturn a few years back, but it’s been coming on pretty strong. [There are] a lot of new competitors… a lot of very small companies.” Gravotech brought with them CO2 and fiber gantry lasers, a 50 W galvo-steered fiber laser and a 3 W green laser to their booth, allowing potential customers a personal glimpse at their company’s offerings.

During the two days of LME, several educational courses covered topics on types of lasers to use for certain applications, laser welding, safety and the economic justification for laser application. These courses worked hand in hand with a pair of tutorials, one each day, on design guidelines for laser welding, and an overview of laser additive manufacturing systems, which helped equip company decision makers with the information they need to decide which type of laser systems to work into their manufacturing process. These educational courses along with keynote presentations were offered at no cost for LME attendees.

One of the main highlights every year at LME is the keynote presentation by David Belforte. Presenting his midyear analysis, LIA past president David Belforte noted that: “Industrial lasers for materials processing represent 11 percent of all machine-tool sales globally.” Belforte continued his presentation, saying among other things that Global revenues from laser sales should increase by 5 percent by the end of 2014, energy and aerospace remain hot areas of opportunity in North America, and that modern smart phone design and manufacturing require about 15 laser functions. “Sapphire cover glass looks like the wave of the future, and if you look at the patents… all of them include laser cutting.”

Three other keynotes from experts in their field also illuminated market conditions and applications for laser cutting, laser additive manufacturing / 3D printing, and ultrafast lasers for use in manufacturing.

The two days of the Lasers for Manufacturing Event and the one-day Summit were truly eye opening and informative. Those in attendance were exposed to new theories, methods, and techniques that can drive their business forward with the use of lasers. Exhibitors and participants talked freely on the exhibition floor – exhibitors learning about their customers’ needs and desires, and participants being able to learn what these companies can offer them. The keynotes provided industry insight on manufacturing trends, while tutorials and educational presentations gave specific advice to companies’ laser operations.

LME 2016 will be held at the Cobb Galleria Centre in Atlanta on April 26-27, 2016.

For more information, visit: www.lia.org/conferences/laserevent

Some new names will join familiar faces teaching the basic and master courses at the Laser Institute of America’s fourth-annual Lasers for Manufacturing Event® (LME®) in Schaumburg, IL, in September. Four expert keynote speakers will again provide big-picture analysis of how and where lasers can improve profitability for firms that bring them into their production lines.

LME 2014 will touch on everything from the right lasers to buy, the proper way to incorporate them into efficient manufacturing systems, how to realize maximum return on your investment, to what applications are best suited for the technology.

Not only will attendees hear from the most knowledgeable experts in the laser field, but they will hear short presentations and case studies from top industry players during LME’s unique Laser Technology Showcase theater right on the exhibit floor.

LIA past President David Belforte will kick off the keynote addresses on Tuesday, Sept. 23, when he discusses The 2014 Market for Industrial Lasers and Applications. His past presentations — always standing-room-only events — cover the use of lasers in everything from agricultural equipment and aerospace to electronic devices and energy generation. Later that afternoon, Mitch Van Zuiden of Bystronic will address advances in laser metal cutting.

Two more speakers will present Wednesday’s keynotes. Tim Biermann of Fraunhofer ILT will enlighten attendees on the revolutionary arena of additive manufacturing and 3D printing, while successful job shop founder Ron Schaeffer of PhotoMachining in Pelham, NH, will spotlight the manufacturing benefits of ultrafast lasers.

In addition, a pair of 90 minute tutorials — one each day — will focus on design for welding, presented by TRUMPF’s David Havrilla, as well as an overview of laser additive manufacturing systems.

Returning to kick off the proceedings is Tom Kugler of Laser Mechanisms, who will again present his comprehensive review of laser systems for the most common manufacturing applications. Geoff Shannon of Miyachi America will give an overview of laser welding, while LIA’s own education director Gus Anibarro talks about best practices for the safe use of industrial laser systems. Finally, TRUMPF’s Patrick Grace will expand on his 2013 presentation on the economic justification for laser applications.

“This is a really good show (and) a really good venue,” Grace enthused after last year’s LME. “We got a lot of good leads and a lot of good projects. There’s a value here; this is going to lead to selling lasers.”

Unlike other shows, LME offers a concentrated experience “where you can walk through and go right from the people doing advanced development and R&D — people like Fraunhofer and EWI — then see every ingredient you need to put a laser into manufacturing, including the robots, the chillers and the coordinate machines,” explains Bill Shiner, vice president of industrial market sales at IPG Photonics in Oxford, MA. “You can go through and in a very short period of time understand not only what you need but get an opportunity to talk to people about applications and see what the equipment looks like.”

For more information or to register, visit: www.lia.org/conferences/laserevent

A brand-new Lasers for Manufacturing Summit to be held Sept. 22 by the Laser Institute of America will bring together C-suite and other top executives who want to hear first-hand expert intelligence on how to use these powerful tools most profitably in a variety of high-value manufacturing applications.

The Lasers for Manufacturing Summit will precede the fourth annual Lasers for Manufacturing Event® (LME®) on Sept. 23-24 in Schaumburg, IL.  Featuring in-depth presentations covering laser manufacturing, additive manufacturing/3D printing and ultrafast lasers, the summit promises a wealth of front-line information tailored to key decision-makers seeking to maximize profits by streamlining manufacturing with lasers.

LIA Past President David Belforte, editor-in-chief of Industrial Laser Solutions magazine and a guru of laser markets around the world, will moderate a special forum featuring panelists from high-profile companies that are manufacturing with lasers. Representatives from top-tier firms will detail how they exploit the power of lasers in the automotive, aerospace, agriculture and other industries.

Belforte’s keynote presentations have become a standing-room-only staple at LME’s Laser Technology Showcase. His exhaustive research on the most lucrative laser markets in industries around the world is a window into the ever-growing opportunities for building business with photonic technology.

For instance, at the second LME in 2012, he enthused that “there are 5,000 narrow-body jets being planned over the next 20 years to be built here in the United States.” Lasers are used to craft components throughout contemporary aircraft, from brackets and door hinges up to turbine engine components and fuel swirlers. The increasingly intricate maneuvers lasers can perform often allow for redesigned parts that can dramatically reduce weight — up to 50 percent or more — by using less material and hence boosting energy efficiency.

In terms of turbine engines, Belforte noted that each of those 5,000 new jets will require two engines. “Every one of those engines has got millions of holes drilled in it,” he said. “There are 1,100 companies in the United States involved in the aircraft turbine engine business; many are using industrial lasers.”

Meanwhile, the medical sector “kept us alive through the recession,” Belforte said, noting an $11.5 billion market for catheters in the US. “Most use lasers for assembly,” including marking, drilling and welding balloons onto the catheter.

The summit is intended to help executives “conquer their competition, their challenges and their fears,” says LIA Executive Director Peter Baker. After this intensive workshop, executives will be armed with knowledge on how to use laser technology for key applications and how to build business with that technology.

The Lasers for Manufacturing Summit is tailored specifically for presidents, CEOs, COOs, chief technology officers, R&D managers, business development directors, technology analysts and sales and marketing executives.

For more information, visit: www.lia.org/lasersummit

Some new names will join familiar faces teaching the basic and master courses at the Laser Institute of America’s fourth annual Lasers for Manufacturing Event® (LME®) this September in Schaumburg, IL. Four expert keynote speakers will again provide big-picture analysis of how and where lasers can improve profitability for firms that bring them into their production lines.

LME 2014 will touch on everything from the right lasers to buy, the proper way to incorporate them into efficient manufacturing systems, how to realize maximum return on your investment, to what applications are best suited for the technology.

Not only will attendees hear from the most knowledgeable experts in the laser field, but they will hear short presentations and case studies from top industry players during LME’s unique Laser Technology Showcase theater right on the exhibit floor.

LIA past President David Belforte will kick off the keynote addresses on Tuesday, Sept. 23, when he discusses The 2014 Market for Industrial Lasers and Applications. His past presentations — always standing-room-only events — cover the use of lasers in everything from agricultural equipment and aerospace to electronic devices and energy generation. Later that afternoon, Mitch Van Zuiden of Bystronic will address advances in laser metal cutting.

Two more frequent LIA speakers will present Wednesday’s keynotes. Ingomar Kelbassa of Fraunhofer ILT will enlighten attendees on the revolutionary arena of additive manufacturing and 3D printing, while successful job shop founder Ron Schaeffer of PhotoMachining in Pelham, NH, will spotlight the manufacturing benefits of ultrafast lasers.

In addition, a pair of 90 minute tutorials — one each day — will focus on design for welding, presented by TRUMPF’s David Havrilla, as well as an overview of laser additive manufacturing systems.

Returning to kick off the proceedings is Tom Kugler of Laser Mechanisms, who will again present his comprehensive review of laser systems for the most common manufacturing applications. Geoff Shannon of Miyachi America will give an overview of laser welding, while LIA’s own education director Gus Anibarro talks about best practices for the safe use of industrial laser systems. Finally, TRUMPF’s Patrick Grace will expand on his 2013 presentation on the economic justification for laser applications.

“This is a really good show (and) a really good venue,” Grace enthused after last year’s LME. “We got a lot of good leads and a lot of good projects. There’s a value here; this is going to lead to selling lasers.”

Unlike other shows, LME offers a concentrated experience “where you can walk through and go right from the people doing advanced development and R&D — people like Fraunhofer and EWI — then see every ingredient you need to put a laser into manufacturing, including the robots, the chillers and the coordinate machines,” explains Bill Shiner, vice president of industrial market sales at IPG Photonics in Oxford, MA. “You can go through and in a very short period of time understand not only what you need but get an opportunity to talk to people about applications and see what the equipment looks like.”

For more information or to register, visit: www.laserevent.org

Friday, 20 September 2013 14:28

ICALEO 2013 Heads to Miami

Written by

ICALEO — the International Congress on Applications of Lasers & Electro–Optics, the granddaddy of LIA’s events always crackles with top research from around the world in some of the most esoteric facets of laser applications. ICALEO is a clearinghouse and a celebration all in one, from the casual welcoming reception to the presentation of the Arthur L. Schawlow Award — and, of course, 350 presentations from some of the most prestigious names in the field. The 32nd-annual event, slated for Oct. 6-10 in Miami, is sure to be another eye-opening experience.

The 32nd International Congress on Applications of Lasers & Electro-Optics (ICALEO®) finally returns to the “Magic City,” continuing its over 30 year history of being the most important conference worldwide in the field of laser materials processing. ICALEO 2013 will feature the three conferences on Laser Materials Processing (LMP, organized by Silke Pflueger), Laser Microprocessing (LMF, organized by Henrikki Pantsar), and Nanomanufacturing (co-organized by Yongfeng Lu and Xianfan Xu). The Laser Materials Processing Conference traditionally covers a wide range of topics on laser macro processing addressing various applications, related laser equipment, and systems. The Laser Microprocessing Conference addresses processes and systems for microscopic applications while the Nanomanufacturing Conference provides recent findings on the nano-scale.

The ICALEO program committee has put together yet another highly interesting program with outstanding contributions from research and engineering covering all parts of emerging laser applications. The plenary session will provide superb and groundbreaking presentations of internationally recognized experts about Photonic applications in all dimensions, followed by the sub-plenary sessions of LMP and the joint LMF/Nano. Special features of this year’s ICALEO are also the laser business session, organized by Klaus Loeffler, and the vendor reception, both addressing the latest industrial developments in the field. Special attention is given again to the Laser Solutions Short Courses, organized by Kerstin Kowalick, jointly conducted on the day before the main conference providing a comprehensive overview on selected topics. Tying with a young tradition ICALEO will be concluded with the closing plenary session addressing the leading-edge developments in digital photonic production with lasers.

For more information, visit: www.icaleo.org

Thursday, 01 August 2013 11:19

David Belforte to Keynote LME 2013

Written by

Laser processing expert David Belforte will present another data-packed state-of-the-industry keynote address at the third annual Lasers for Manufacturing Event® (LME®) on Sept 11, 2013 at the Renaissance Schaumburg (IL) Convention Center Hotel.

Belforte, past president of the Laser Institute of America and Chief Editor of Industrial Laser Solutions magazine, has been a popular speaker at LIA’s unique event. LME 2013 will bring together laser systems providers, systems integrators and representatives from many industries — aerospace, automotive, energy, medical — that use laser-based manufacturing to maximize production efficiency and profitability.

Speaking at the Laser Technology Showcase Theater on the exhibit floor, Belforte promises another insightful look into key sectors where lasers are poised to make the greatest gains in his talk, The Market for Industrial Lasers and Applications®.

“At the midpoint of 2013, performance in the industrial laser marketplace was following projections made in January,” Belforte says. “Market growth in revenues was in the mid-single digits as global manufacturing continued to feel the restrictions of soft economies. Even the vibrant market in China was not immune from first half uncertainty as that economy was not exempt from market pressure and North American and European exports were lower than anticipated.”

Even so, “the market appears on track to end the year on a high note as economies return to normality and fourth quarter orders for first quarter 2014 shipments are expected to build. Leading the market resurgence in the second half of 2013 will be fiber-laser revenues, which will continue to outperform the market overall.”

At last year’s LME, Belforte predicted significant opportunities for high-powered lasers in applications for everything from multiple automotive components to jet aircraft engines to pipeline welding and downhole drilling.

“When we look at lasers in automotive, we think of more than brazing the roofs or doing marking on the VIN plates,” he noted. “We look at the whole range of applications that go in the vehicles. Some of the laser suppliers will show you charts of an automobile that have hundreds of laser applications on them.”

Meanwhile, “there are 5,000 narrow-bodied jets planned over the next 20 years to be built here in the United States,” he said. “Every one of them has two engines, each with millions of holes drilled in (them). There are 1,100 companies in the United States involved in the aircraft turbine engine business; many are using industrial lasers.” Alternative materials have also provided room for growth. “I never thought we would be cutting composites with lasers, but the fiber laser is doing an interesting application in cutting composites (as) more and more composites are being used in aircraft.”

Lasers really shine in the most intricate operations. The smart phone business is “just spectacular,” he asserted. The market “seems to have no bounds. If you take apart that smart phone, you’ll find lasers being used all over the phone for a variety of applications.” Lasers are also vital to producing displays and circuitry for ever-more-popular tablets. In health care, “Stents are getting more and more sophisticated (and) they have to be processed by lasers. Lasers are doing well every year in expanding this market.”

Belforte’s address is one of four 30 minute keynotes, two 90 minute tutorials and four laser basics courses that make LME a must-attend event for those firmly entrenched in laser-based manufacturing or those who wish to add laser technology to their production lines or job shops. Located in the cradle of a major US manufacturing hub, LME draws not only local experts but key players from around the world to share their tips for success.

For more information or to register, visit: www.laserevent.org

Wednesday, 21 November 2012 10:50

LAM 2013 Registration is Now Open

Written by

LIA’s Laser Additive Manufacturing Workshop (LAM®) will bring industry specialists, executives, users and researchers from around the world to show how laser additive processes can be applied effectively and affordably to today’s manufacturing challenges. This workshop will have a significant impact on the widespread industrial implementations of laser additive manufacturing.

Leading the charge in advocating such cutting-edge rapid manufacture and 3D printing is the Laser Institute of America, which holds its 5th annual Laser Additive Manufacturing (LAM) Workshop in Houston, TX on Feb 12–13, 2013. The 5th annual Laser Additive Manufacturing Workshop in Houston takes a bold leap forward in 2013 as the Laser Institute of America creates a special slate of instruction focused exclusively on rapid manufacturing.

LAM is a vital part of LIA’s suite of renowned conferences, along with the annual International Congress on Applications of Lasers and Electro-Optics (ICALEO®) and the newer Lasers for Manufacturing Event (LME). LIA’s signature events present the full spectrum of knowledge about rapid manufacture, from the research driving it, to how and when to use it — and employ it profitably.

“What a great workshop” added LIA’s Marketing Director, Jim Naugle “I have witnessed the growth of the event for 4 years. Each year you learn something new about this advancing technology and how it will be a game changer for the manufacturing industry. You won’t want to miss next year’s 5th Anniversary!”

For more information, visit: www.lia.org/conferences/lam

What a difference a year makes. In 2011, the Laser Institute of America unveiled its one-of-a-kind Lasers for Manufacturing Event (LME®) to an enormously enthusiastic response. The two-day gathering in the cradle of U.S. manufacturing proved a vital one-stop resource for engineers, job shops, automotive and aerospace specialists — anyone keen on adding the production power, efficiency and cost-effectiveness of laser systems to their processes.

Now LIA, the recognized authority in laser applications, safety and research since 1968, has fired up round two of LME in a big way — with an expanded educational program including new fundamentals courses, a pair of two-hour tutorials detailing the basics of welding and joining and ultrafast machining, and a companion two-day Laser Welding & Joining Workshop.

Another first on the show floor this year, will be the presence of working laser systems. Now, not only can attendees talk directly with a show floor full of experts knowledgeable in every aspect of laser-based manufacturing, they can witness first-hand what these systems can achieve. Add to that the return of the highly popular Laser Technology Showcase, where exhibitors can share insights into their approaches with laser technology, and the stage is set for another information-packed session.

LME, returning to the Renaissance® Convention Center Hotel in Schaumburg, IL, Oct. 23-24, is unique to the laser industry in that it focuses exclusively on providing an overview of every conceivable aspect of choosing lasers for manufacturing, creating production systems, operating them safely — and realizing a solid profit.

Unlike other shows, LME offers a concentrated experience “where you can walk through and go right from the people doing advanced research and development — companies like Fraunhofer and EWI — then see every ingredient you need to put a laser into manufacturing, including the robots, the chillers and the coordinate machines,” explains Bill Shiner, vice president of industrial market sales at IPG Photonics in Oxford, MA. “You can go through, and in a very short period of time, understand not only what you need, but get an opportunity to talk to people about applications and see what the equipment looks like.”

Not only does LME draw a technical audience, but it also attracts small company presidents, engineers who make buying decisions — industry players ready to take advantage of the bold leaps lasers can make in terms of cutting material usage, costs and time.

GET UP TO SPEED
Among LME’s benefits is the ability to hear some of the top minds in the laser industry provide highly focused presentations on laser fundamentals.

Once again, LIA has slated recognized speakers to address key areas in the “101-level” basic courses covering the types of lasers used in manufacturing, laser system components and options, return on investment and laser safety. Besides these “101-level” courses, LIA has added three “102-level” courses to address the fundamentals of laser cutting, robotics and additive manufacturing.

In addition, four other experts will share up-to-the-minute insights into major applications and markets, requirements for the automotive industry, and the impact of lasers in manufacturing for the aerospace and plastics industries.

And after those sessions are completed, attendees can follow up on the exhibition floor at the “Ask a Laser Expert” booth manned by Rob Mueller of NuTech Engineering and a team of industry experts.

PROFIT WITH PHOTONICS
The momentum behind this lineup is the wealth of opportunities presenting themselves in a number of industries.

“The automotive industry is very, very hot — direct automotive as well as the tier 1 and tier 2 companies,” notes Shiner. “There’s a huge market developing that never existed. Worldwide, people are converting to high-strength steel. You can’t stamp it; you’ve got to use either plasma or laser. And lasers greatly outshine plasma machines in speed and quality.”

Add to that the fact that weight reduction of components — and hence final products — is a significant goal of today’s carmakers, who are employing lasers in the manufacture of seats, electric car batteries and other components. “People aren’t just replacing lasers to increase production,” Shiner says. “New material is making them make new capital investments. That benefits people who make beam-delivery equipment, motion equipment and robotics.”

In the meantime, aerospace “is in a buying mode because there’s a world shortage in hole-drilling capability, and they’re extremely interested in newer lasers as they expand production,” Shiner continues. “Aerospace hasn’t made a major investment, probably for a decade, in drilling and cutting machines.  But now they’re looking at these new lasers.” And for makers of medical devices, the ability of lasers to join plastics is a continuing boom.

NEXT-LEVEL INSTRUCTION
Taking the fundamentals track several steps farther, LIA has added two tutorials to the LME program to highlight the basics of ultrafast laser machining and the critical aspects of laser welding and joining. So vital is the latter topic to a diverse array of industries that a separate two-day workshop will run concurrently with LME 2012.

Chaired by Prof. Eckhard Beyer of Fraunhofer IWS, LIA’s Laser Welding & Joining Workshop will appeal to representatives from the aerospace, defense, automotive, energy and medical industries. The extensive agenda will give attendees a comprehensive look at current practices and future applications for cladding, brazing and different types of laser welding — conduction, penetration, hybrid and remote, as well as macro and micro applications.

Beyer and his team have assembled a schedule of 18 presentations by “industrial research experts to give a sound overview of laser basics and current developments,” he says. “End users with longstanding experience will present their solutions to the typical challenges of laser applications.”

While laser welding is relatively traditional process, newer and better lasers and systems are greatly advancing its possibilities.

“We still see a big impact of the tremendous rise in beam quality and energy efficiency,” Beyer claims. “Here the application fields are expanded in many ways: ultra-low distortions or the realization of new mixed-material joints like copper-aluminum using precisely shaped weld pools. Also, remote-beam applications are now standard; that was a field restricted to expensive high-brightness lasers just a few years ago. Furthermore, laser size reduction is a key development: Many lasers are now so small that machine integration is much simpler and can be done in a way not possible before.”

Attendees will learn from the perspectives of large companies like GE, as well as integrators and research experts, according to Dr. Gunther Göbel, a special joining technologies expert with Fraunhofer IWS.

For example, “ESAB will give us insights into the impact of lasers in heavy industry and how it is changing this industry from essentially low-tech, high-craft operations to more high-tech, low-cost production,” Göbel notes.

Göbel and Jens Standfuss will address the welding of mixed materials using high brightness lasers — a vital application in the automotive industry.

“A very prominent example is still the powertrain industry,” Göbel explains. “This also includes off-highway drivetrain components. In this domain, the laser is a very important tool as it enables significant advances: higher productivity, higher efficiency, low heat input, low distortion, etc.”

Attendees of LME will have exclusive access to expertise in a special two-hour tutorial on the basics of ultrafast laser machining taught by Prof. Reinhart Poprawe of Fraunhofer ILT, president of the Laser Institute of America, who is no stranger to pushing the boundaries of laser manufacturing. Having earned Aviation Week’s 2012 Innovation Challenge award for producing a vital multiblade compressor component far faster and more cheaply with lasers than with traditional milling, he is at the forefront of exploring the fast-improving technology. Groundbreaking achievements in the context of ultrashort laser processing at ILT in Aachen are world records in fs-lasers, industrial systems in the kW-class have been developed and are available in the market now via spin offs like EdgeWave or Amphos. The outstanding characteristics in terms of precision immediately are convincing.

“The development of ultrafast lasers on an industrial scale, with pulse durations of 100 femtoseconds to 10 picoseconds and powers up to the kilowatt class, has led to a new level of laser processing — with ultimate processing quality,” Poprawe explains.

Poprawe’s tutorial at LME will feature technical examples of the technology as well as a survey of fundamentals, the processes, systems, materials and applicable markets. The target audience of engineers and scientists from machine suppliers and end users will learn the advantages and potential of the technology.

“Manufacturers of ultrafast lasers and optical systems will learn about the requirements on system technology with respect to laser parameters and processing parameters,” Poprawe says. “Users of precision machining applications with accuracies in the range of 10 microns and below should attend to learn how this new technology could improve the performance of existing components by adding functions through laser-based surface functionalization or how ultrafast laser machining could lead to new high-precision products. Ablation rates of the order of 10 mm³/s have been demonstrated and shall be presented.”

Starting with the physical basics of ultrashort pulse interaction phenomena, the tutorial will survey a broad array of applications — tool and molding, automotive engine components, LED and OLED light-guiding systems, photovoltaics and energy storage, biomedical applications and general surface processing. In addition, various approaches for setting up ultrashort pulsed lasers will be addressed, as will system requirements for high-speed scanning and modulations systems.

LME: LIKE NO OTHER LASER EVENT
LME, being held once again in proximity to many of the top automakers and laser job shops in the U.S., is geared to be one-stop shopping for those either seeking to refine current laser systems and applications or assessing potential new ways to employ photonics in production.

“As many laser manufacturers and system builders are engaged in the workshop, this would be an ideal opportunity to get application-related questions answered and get new ideas on how to use lasers,”  Beyer notes. “We are going to unite many people from the laser community who were and are shaping the way the world of lasers is today. This will make it possible to address lasers from basics to high-end applications.”

At the inaugural LME in 2011, auto manufacturers were out in force.

“I had one guy asking about a battery welding application (and) another guy asking about glass processing; they do automotive glass mirrors and asked about laser scribing,” Mueller recalls from manning the expert booth in the exhibit hall. “There are enough lasers in automotive now that they’re starting to look around and go, ‘OK, where else can I do it?’ Management is comfortable to a certain extent with existing applications; now we can look around a bit farther. ”

One of those auto-industry attendees was Octavio Islas, an automotive product engineer with Magna/Cosma in Mexico. For him, LME is “a good opportunity for everybody to learn about all the technologies in the same place. You can get a lot of information from all the suppliers. If you have any specific requirement, you have people with a lot of knowledge and experience, and they can tell you about your application and all the details.”

For attendees and exhibitors alike, LME creates a powerful networking environment.

“We’re seeing new blood at this exhibition,” asserts Shiner, who had a significant role in crafting the inaugural LME and chairs the committee which oversees LME. “I’m seeing people I didn’t even know.”

The thing to remember in the laser processing arena, he counsels, is that, “Almost any machine for production is a custom design; you have to listen to the customer.”  With LME, the industry now has the perfect venue for those conversations to take place.

For more information, visit: www.lia.org/conferences/laserevent

Thursday, 11 October 2012 10:58

LIA's Lasers for Manufacturing Event

Written by

LIA's Lasers for Manufacturing Event (LME™) will provide a one stop event for companies interested in integrating laser technology into their production. As an attendee you will learn about automation equipment, laser choices, beam delivery, safety considerations, applications development and meet exhibitors that supply these products and services.

Get the most out of attending LME:

  • View the most up-to-date laser equipment
  • Gain valuable ideas from leading producers
  • Meet with professionals from around the world who can provide solutions to your laser manufacturing needs and challenges
  • Find suppliers who can help you grow your business
  • Get the tools to compete

Mingle with over 65 exhibitors addressing all aspects of materials processing including:

  • Cladding
  • Marking
  • Welding
  • Cutting
  • Brazing
  • Drilling
  • Sintering
  • Scribing

LME is the place to see and learn about the most up-to-date laser technology. Save time & money while you meet & learn from industry peers & experts. For more information and the LME Advance Program, click here.

October 23-24, 2012
Renaissance Schaumburg Convention Center Hotel
Schaumburg, Illinois

Discount code for FREE LME registration: PROTOTYPE
($50 Value)

For more information or to register, visit: www.lia.org/lme/prototype

Prof. Reinhart Poprawe of Fraunhofer ILT, president of the Laser Institute of America, is no stranger to pushing the boundaries of laser manufacturing. Having earned Aviation Week’s 2012 Innovation Challenge award for producing a vital multiblade compressor component far faster and more cheaply with lasers than with traditional milling, he is at the forefront of exploring the fast-improving technology. Groundbreaking achievements in the context of ultrashort laser processing at ILT in Aachen are world records in fs-lasers, industrial systems in the kW-class have been developed and are available in the market now via spin offs like EdgeWave or Amphos. The outstanding characteristics in terms of precision immediately are convincing.

Attendees of LIA’s second-annual Lasers for Manufacturing Event (LME™) in Schaumburg, IL, will have exclusive access to his expertise in a special two-hour tutorial on the basics of ultrafast laser machining on Oct. 24.

“The development of ultrafast lasers on an industrial scale, with pulse durations of 100 femtoseconds to 10 picoseconds and powers up to the kilowatt class, has led to a new level of laser processing — with ultimate processing quality,” Prof. Poprawe explains.

Prof. Poprawe’s tutorial at LME will feature technical examples of the technology as well as a survey of fundamentals, the processes, systems, materials and applicable markets, he says. The target audience of engineers and scientists from machine suppliers and end users will learn the advantages and potential of the technology

“Manufacturers of ultrafast lasers and optical systems will learn about the requirements on system technology with respect to laser parameters and processing parameters,” Prof. Poprawe says. “Users of precision machining applications with accuracies in the range of 10 microns and below should attend to learn how this new technology could improve the performance of existing components by adding functions through laser-based surface functionalization or how ultrafast laser machining could lead to new high-precision products. Ablation rates of the order of 10 mm³/s have been demonstrated and shall be presented.”

Starting with the physical basics of ultrashort pulse interaction phenomena, the tutorial will survey a broad array of applications — tool and molding, automotive engine components, LED and OLED light-guiding systems, photovoltaics and energy storage, biomedical applications and general surface processing. In addition, various approaches for setting up ultrashort pulsed lasers will be addressed, as will system requirements for high-speed scanning and modulations systems.

Why is this session from LIA, the leading source of laser application research and safety since 1968, so vital today?

“Ultrashort pulsed lasers are heading to the edge of mass industrialization and will undergo similar growth rates like other lasers in the past,” Prof. Poprawe asserts. “Industrial needs have to be specified for numerous applications so researchers and system manufacturers can concentrate on short cycle time manufacturing solutions.”

For more information or to register, visit: www.lia.org/conferences/laserevent

Tuesday, 04 September 2012 09:51

LASER World of PHOTONICS CHINA 2013

Written by

On March 19-21, 2013, Asia’s leading laser and photonics trade show, LASER World of PHOTONICS CHINA 2013, is going to open at the Shanghai New International Expo Centre. From components to industrial applications, LASER World of PHOTONICS CHINA has always taken a leading role in the industry and showcased its entire spectrum in four categories: Lasers and Optoeletronics, Optics and Manufacturing Technology for Optics, Laser Systems for Production Engineering, Imaging and Optical Metrology. Dedicated to the development and innovation of all fields in the industry and the communication between researchers and experts from institutions and companies all over the world, the 8th LASER World of PHOTONICS CHINA provides you with the best platform for finding solutions in light.

LASER World of PHOTONICS CHINA 2013 is expected to occupy an area of 370,000 square feet, with about 600 exhibitors from China and other countries across the world. Currently, TRUMPF, Rofin, IPG, Miyachi, Han’s Laser, SIASUN, SPI, Delphi, II-VI, Coherent, Newport, Qioptiq, Raylase, JDSU, Jenoptik, Leoni, Physik Instrumente, Huagong and Chutian amongst others, have already applied for LASER World of PHOTONICS CHINA 2013. The exhibited products include lasers and optoelectronics, optics, manufacturing technology for optics, sensors, test and measurement, laser systems for production engineering, optical measurement systems, optical information and communication, biophotonics and medical engineering, imaging, illumination and energy, security and services. During its 3-day show in 2012,  LASER World of PHOTONICS CHINA has attracted 475 exhibitors from 19 countries and districts, an increase of 31.6% compared to 2011, as well as 34,326 professional visitors from 40 countries and districts, a 19% growth over 2011. These record numbers have confirmed its leading position in the Asian laser and photonics market.

At the same time, the PHOTONICS CONGRESS CHINA will be held in conjunction with LASER World of PHOTONICS CHINA 2013 again. PHOTONICS CONGRESS CHINA covers several sectors in lasers and photonics. Topics range from latest research and development in laser procession, lasers, optical technology to renewable energy. The Congress includes four programs: 8th International Conference on Laser Processes and Components(LPC 2013); Optics Frontier –The 8th Conference on Laser Technology and Optoelectronics and Release of 2012 China Optics Outstanding Achievements and Products; OSA Photonics Technology Program and Technical Training Courses Series. The combination of science, research and industrial applications both in the conferences and the trade fair supports the exchange between the scientific and industrial sectors and emphasizes its unique practical value. PHOTONICS CONGRESS CHINA in 2012 attracted 1,266 audiences.

LASER World of PHOTONICS CHINA is the regional leading trade fair for optical technologies in China. It takes place in Shanghai each March and is collocated with electronica China & productronica China. LASER World of PHOTONICS is the world’s leading trade fair for optical technologies. It has taken place in Munich every two years since 1973. The World of Photonics Congress takes place parallel to it and is the largest photonics congress in Europe, in which the globally leading organizations collaborate. As of September 2012, there is a new event, i.e. LASER World of PHOTONICS INDIA. It is a regional trade fair for laser and photonics technologies in India and takes place in Mumbai every year. With a total of 1,550 exhibitors and more than 60,000 visitors in Munich and Shanghai, Messe München International is the world’s leading trade fair organizer for lasers and photonics.

For more information, visit: www.world-of-photonics.net

When additive manufacturing guru Terry Wohlers speaks, the laser industry listens. That’s why the Laser Institute of America featured him at its cutting-edge Laser Additive Manufacturing (LAM) Workshop last year in Houston, where Wohlers presented key findings from his annual report on global trends in LAM. LIA invited him as part of a concerted effort to spotlight the latest advances in laser sintering, selective laser melting, laser metal deposition and 3D printing.

“No one really knows how big (LAM) will become, but when you look at aircraft parts, automotive, dental, medical, printing human tissue … jewelry, games — the list goes on and on,” Wohlers relates in a video interview from LAM 2012, where he gave one of the keynote addresses. For example, “GE believes (it) will be building up to and maybe even more than 50 percent of a gas turbine engine by additive manufacturing.”

So far-reaching are the effects of laser additive manufacturing technologies that Wohlers was featured in a February 2010 cover story by The Economist titled “Print Me a Stradivarius,” in which the Colorado-based consultant noted that more than 20 percent of the output of 3D printers is final products; he expects this to rise to 50 percent by 2020. Meanwhile, a column in the Jan. 30 Wall Street Journal called LAM one of three keys to the new tech boom in the United States, imagining the “ ‘desktop’ printing of entire final products from wheels to even washing machines.”

LIA, the recognized leader in providing indispensable industry resources and premier events showcasing up-to-the-minute laser research since 1968, is making sure its members are kept abreast of such developments. For LAM 2012, LIA crafted a program featuring LAM innovations in the production of everything from small consumer products, to patient-specific medical prostheses, to vital aviation components.

For instance, Dr. Ingomar Kelbassa of Fraunhofer ILT detailed a project in which his firm created an 80-blade high-pressure compressor BLISK (blade-integrated disk) with high-speed laser metal deposition in under two minutes per blade — 160 minutes total — at near net shape. He compared those results with conventional five-axis milling, which removes 80 percent to 90 percent of material — and takes more than 180 hours. Days later, Aviation Week honored Fraunhofer ILT with a 2012 Innovation Challenge award for the advance.

“I would challenge you to name an industry that won’t be impacted,” Wohlers asserts in LIA’s video interview. “I truly believe that additive manufacturing will develop to become the most important, the most strategic and most useful manufacturing technology ever — to exceed injection molding, all kinds of castings, CNC milling, die casting or blow molding. Name your favorite manufacturing process — this will become bigger and more used by a much, much wider audience than any other technology available.”

The experience of his first LAM workshop “exceeded my expectations,” Wohlers said. He praised “the caliber of individual that’s here (and) the amount of information that I learned — I’ve taken two full pages of notes.”

Expect another information-packed event when the 5th annual LAM Workshop convenes Feb. 12-13 in Houston. The session will cover various metal and plastic powders used in LAM, digital manufacturing in medicine and dentistry, surface tailoring, international markets, and how the technology could effect a paradigm shift in manufacturing.

For more information or to register, visit: www.lia.org/lam

The International Congress on Applications of Lasers & Electro-Optics (ICALEO®) has a 30 year history as the conference where researchers and end-users meet to review the state-of-the art in laser materials processing and predict where the future will lead. From its inception, ICALEO has been devoted to the field of laser materials processing and is viewed as the premier source of technical information in the field.

ICALEO 2012 attendees will include anyone interested in laser materials processing from the basic understanding of the interaction between a laser beam and a material, to those interested in how a process can be integrated and optimized for an application. Laser Institute of America's goal for ICALEO is to bring both academic and industrial people together who may benefit from laser technology. This includes end-users and scientists as well as engineers and technicians engaged in developing laser technology.

President's Reception

ICALEO will feature an evening reception hosted by LIA President Reinhart Poprawe at the greatly admired Marconi Automotive Museum. Meet the LIA Officers, Board of Directors, the ICALEO Congress General Chair and Conference Chairs, while being surrounded by high-performance muscle cars and vintage formula racecars.

Laser Industry Vendor Reception & Tabletop Display

Exhibitors and attendees have the opportunity to discuss equipment and applications in a relaxed setting. After completion of the technical sessions, enjoy drinks and hors d'oeuvres while sharing product ideas with your colleagues and suppliers!

Awards Luncheon

Celebrate 30 years of ICALEO by attending LIA's Annual Meeting & Awards Luncheon and enjoy lunch with colleagues followed by the awards presentation and honored speaker address!

September 23-27, 2012
International Congress on Applications of Lasers & Electro–Optics
Anaheim Marriott Hotel® Resort (Anaheim, CA, USA)

*Discounted pricing still available! Register before September 1st and save! Students and retired LIA members must register before September 1st to take advantage of special pricing.

For more information or to register, visit: www.lia.org/conferences/icaleo/attend

Thursday, 09 August 2012 10:20

LIA's Laser Welding & Joining Workshop

Written by

LIA's Laser Welding & Joining Workshop will bring together industry specialists from around the world with the goal of applying laser materials joining technologies to today's manufacturing challenges and opportunities. This Workshop will offer quality technical sessions and networking opportunities to discuss equipment and applications with top laser industry leaders.

Dates: Oct 23, 2012 through Oct 24, 2012

Topics to Include:

  • Laser Welding Equipment/Systems
  • Laser-Hybrid Welding
  • Future Trends
  • Laser Conduction Welding
  • Plastics Joining
  • Materials Joining Processes
  • Laser Penetration Welding
  • Laser Weld Types
  • Laser Welding vs. Traditional Welding Techniques
  • Remote Laser Welding
  • Laser Cladding
  • Future Applications

Industries Represented:

  • Aerospace
  • Defense
  • Automotive
  • Battery & Electronics
  • Government
  • Energy & Chemical
  • Power Generation & Advanced Energy
  • Heavy Manufacturing
  • Medical

Who Should Attend:

  • Manufacturing Engineers and Managers
  • Product Designers
  • Process/R&D Engineers
  • Applications Engineers
  • Business Developers and Entrepreneurs
  • Plant Supervisors and Managers
  • Anyone interested in laser materials joining technology (welding, joining or brazing)

For more information or to register, visit: www.lia.org/store/conf/lme2012

The International Congress on Applications of Lasers & Electro-Optics (ICALEO®) has a 30 year history as the conference where researchers and end-users meet to review the state-of-the art in laser materials processing and predict where the future will lead. From its inception, ICALEO has been devoted to the field of laser materials processing and is viewed as the premier source of technical information in the field.

ICALEO 2012 attendees will range from anyone interested in laser materials processing from the basic understanding of the interaction between a laser beam and a material, to those interested in how a process can be integrated and optimized for an application. Laser Institute of America's goal for ICALEO is to bring both academic and industrial people together who may benefit from laser technology. This includes end-users and scientists as well as engineers and technicians engaged in developing laser technology.

ICALEO Highlighted Events:

  • President's Reception: ICALEO will feature an evening reception hosted by LIA President Reinhart Poprawe at the greatly admired Marconi Automotive Museum. Meet the LIA Officers, Board of Directors, ICALEO Congress General Chair and Conference Chairs while being surrounded by high-performance muscle cars and vintage formula racecars.
  • Laser Industry Vendor Reception & Tabletop Display: Exhibitors and attendees have the opportunity to discuss equipment and applications in a relaxed setting. After completion of the technical sessions, enjoy drinks and hors d'oeuvres while sharing product ideas with your colleagues and suppliers!
  • Awards Luncheon: Celebrate 30 years of ICALEO by attending LIA's Annual Meeting & Awards Luncheon and enjoy lunch with colleagues followed by the awards presentation and honored speaker address!
  • Networking Opportunities: Meet colleagues from around the world!

Register Online before August 2, 2012 and receive $25 off full conference registration. No discount code or coupon necessary.

Featuring:

  • Plenary Session
  • Laser Materials Processing Conference
  • Laser Microprocessing Conference
  • Nanomanufacturing Conference
  • Poster Presentation Gallery
  • Laser Solutions Short Courses
  • Business Forum & Panel Discussion
  • President's Reception
  • Student Paper Award
  • Laser Industry Vendor Reception & Tabletop Display
  • LIA Annual Meeting & Awards Luncheon
  • Networking Opportunities - meet colleagues from around the world!

When & Where:

September 23-27, 2012
Anaheim Marriott Hotel® Resort
700 West Convention Way.
Anaheim, CA 92802

For more information or to register, visit: www.lia.org/conferences/icaleo/conference

LIA’s Lasers for Manufacturing Event (LME™) takes a bold leap forward in its second year as exhibitors are being invited to bring working laser systems to the unique one-stop showcase for laser-based production.

Building on the momentum and overwhelmingly positive feedback of the inaugural event in 2011 in Schaumburg, IL, LME will return to the Renaissance Schaumburg Convention Center Hotel bigger and bolder on Oct. 23-24. LME 2012 will feature more basic courses and a pair of two-hour tutorials addressing welding and joining and ultrafast laser processes.

Education at LME

LIA has unveiled an expanded educational track this year. LME 2012 will again provide attendees vital guidance on how to create effective and efficient laser-based production systems to increase profitability in a broad range of applications, predominantly aerospace, automotive and medical.

Three new courses addressing the fundamentals of laser additive manufacturing, cutting and robotics have been added along with the two tutorials. These will appear alongside primer sessions on the main types of lasers used for manufacturing, creating laser systems and establishing the return on investment.

In addition, a new two-day Laser Welding & Joining Workshop, chaired by LIA past president and Schawlow award winner Prof. Eckhard Beyer of Fraunhofer IWS, will run concurrently with LME. “As many laser manufacturers and system builders are engaged in the workshop, this would be an ideal opportunity to get application-related questions answered and get new ideas on how to use lasers,” Dr. Beyer noted. “We are going to unite many people from the laser community who are shaping the way the world of lasers is today. This will make it possible to address lasers from the basics to high-end applications.”

The Welding & Joining Workshop will feature 18 presentations, spread out over two days to allow ample time for attendees to interact directly with OEMs in the exhibit hall.

“The workshop will start with short courses presented by industrial research experts to give a sound overview of laser basics and current developments. End users with long standing experience will present their solutions to the typical challenges of laser applications.”

Some of those applications will include power-train welding, remote welding, hybrid welding and “micro” applications, he noted. Such applications are being refined constantly as lasers continue to evolve.

“We still see a big impact of the tremendous rise in beam quality and energy efficiency,” Beyer says. “Here the application fields are expanded in many ways: ultra-low distortions or the realization of new mixed-material joints like copper-aluminum using precisely shaped weld pools. Also, remote-beam applications are now standard; that was a field restricted to expensive high-brightness lasers just a few years ago. Furthermore, laser size reduction is a key development; many lasers are now so small that machine integration is much simpler and can be done in a way not possible before.”

Focus on Ultrafast Lasers

Although slated as a tutorial this year, the program on ultrafast lasers could grow into another two-day workshop next year. For the inaugural session, LIA President Prof. Reinhart Poprawe of Fraunhofer ILT says the educational track will feature technical examples, a survey of Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 1-9 materials and an overview of markets and materials. He says the session will be particularly geared to those involved with optical systems and scanning technologies, as well as users of precision machining applications with accuracy in the range of 10 microns and below.

“The development of ultrafast lasers with pulse durations of some 100 femtoseconds to 10 picoseconds on an industrial scale with powers up to the kilowatt class, has led to a new level of laser processing with ultimate processing quality,” Prof. Poprawe noted. “Starting with physical basics on ultrashort pulse interaction phenomena, the tutorial will give a survey on different applications from electronics, energy topics and tooling technology to large area processing for tribology optimization and surface functionalization.”

The tutorial is particularly suited for engineers and scientists from machine suppliers and end users, Poprawe said. And “manufacturers of ultrafast lasers and optical systems (scanning technologies) will learn about the requirements on system technology with respect to laser parameters and processing parameters.”

LIA is showing once again that it is at the forefront of advocating cutting-edge laser technology, as “ultrashort pulsed lasers are heading to the edge of mass industrialization and will undergo similar growth rates like other lasers in the past,” Poprawe asserted.  

Ultrafast lasers are being applied in the biomedical, automotive, and tool and molding industries; LED and OLED light-guiding systems; photovoltaics and energy storage; and general surface processing. The tutorial will help shed some light on current debate over what kind of pulse lengths are optimal for what materials, how best to apply high-repetition lasers to workpieces, and how researchers and manufacturers can concentrate on shortening manufacturing cycle times.

Safety Education

In addition to spotlighting the bottom-line benefits of lasers, the working systems at the Event will put the need for laser safety front and center.

LIA Education Director Gus Anibarro, who will be the event’s Laser Safety Officer (LSO), will again give a one-hour presentation on assessing beam and nonbeam hazards in the laser manufacturing environment and how to ensure the safety of operating personnel.

Just as he did at the first LME, Anibarro will condense his extensive laser safety experience into an information-packed session that highlights prevention rudiments addressed more fully in LIA’s two-, three- and five-day laser safety courses (view the LIA’s full range of laser-safety courses and online resources at www.lia.org/education/online). The crash course in proper laser use will cover the classes of lasers, direct vs. reflected exposure, the need to control laser-generated air contaminants, skin and eye hazards and how to choose eyewear of the proper optical density (OD).

Networking Made Easy

LME, held in proximity to a large number of manufacturers and job shops, is an all-in-one experience for those either seeking to refine current laser systems and applications or assessing potential new ways to employ lasers in production. While the educational program provides tools to help assess the benefit of investing in lasers, the exhibit floor provides a real-time marketplace to discuss applications and primary and ancillary equipment with top-tier suppliers.

To that end, LME will again feature the highly popular Laser Technology Showcase, a stage at the front of the exhibit hall that will be used for keynote educational presentations and shorter informational addresses by many companies in attendance. The showcase format helped foster interaction between attendees seeking solutions and a wide array of industry leaders able to lend their expertise in person.

As Mike Klos, general manager of Midwest operations for IPG Photonics in Novi, MI, summed up at the inaugural LME:  “(At other shows) you get lost between the drill bits and the cutting oil. If you’ve ever looked at a laser application, this is the right place to come. Everybody’s here.”

For more information or to register, visit: www.laserevent.org

A record breaking audience attended the Laser Institute of America’s fourth-annual Laser Additive Manufacturing (LAM) workshop in Houston, which featured a slew of success stories emerging from wider acceptance of the technology.

“The use of CAD-directed lasers to produce consumer products, aviation parts, medical prostheses, and more out of metal or plastic powder is gaining acceptance around the world”, said keynote speaker Terry Wohlers. LIA devoted more of the LAM 2012 workshop to the process because, as fellow keynote Dr. Ingomar Kelbassa of Fraunhofer ILT summarized, the technology offers “complexity for free and individualization for free.”

Additive Manufacturing was estimated to be a $1.3 billion industry in 2010, with compound annual growth of 24 percent; it likely grew into a $1.5 billion to $1.6 billion industry in 2011, said Wohlers, who founded his consulting firm Wohlers Associates 25 years ago in Fort Collins, CO. Initially used primarily for rapid prototyping, LAM’s ability to produce ready-to-use parts in dramatically less time and at far less cost is driving exploration of further applications in a broad range of industries. For example:

  • So-called “personal” 3D printers — non-industrial units that cost from $500 to a few thousand dollars — grew from about 66 units sold worldwide in 2007 to nearly 6,000 by 2010, Wohlers said. Small firms like Digital Forming, Shapeways and Materialise offer a slew of customizable consumer products produced with lasers.

  • Major aviation firms are realizing tremendous benefits from LAM. Boeing, which uses the technology for 200 parts in 10 production platforms, can reduce a stack of certification paperwork to two sheets of paper. Airbus is gearing up to produce thousands of brackets that connect aircraft galleys and lavatories, saving 50 percent to 80 percent of part weight — and $2.5 million in fuel annually on short-haul flights for every 220 pounds (100 kilograms) eliminated. And Fraunhofer ILT just earned an Aviation Week innovation award for producing an 80-blade high-pressure compressor disk in 160 minutes vs. 180 hours using conventional five-axis milling.

  • Dr. Richard Grylls, senior additive manufacturing specialist with Optomec, said his firm has installed more than 150 LAM systems in more than 12 countries. Those systems do everything from make custom dental implants and pelvic bone-fixation plates to repair cast-iron impellers to mold tires. One Optomec customer reports $1 million a year in savings; others have reduced repair costs up to 30 percent, repair times up to 50 percent and improved part weight ratios by 40 percent.

Wohlers enthused about radical projects from a dramatically redesigned bearing for a clothes dryer to the wing of an ultralight craft created as one piece complete with hinged flap. He even raised the possibility of “printing” electronics or battery materials that conform to product shapes.

LAM 2012 also focused on more traditional laser cladding to repair and prevent corrosion and wear. Representatives from Gold Sponsor Joining Technologies, VITO-Flemish Institute for Technological Research NV, Hayden Laser Services and Bronze Sponsors POM Group and Titanova, detailed their latest work.

“What a great workshop” added LIA’s Marketing Director, Jim Naugle “I have witnessed the growth of the event for 4 years. Each year you learn something new about this advancing technology and how it will be a game changer for the manufacturing industry. You won’t want to miss next year’s 5th Anniversary!”

The continued support from overall Platinum Sponsor Alabama Laser along with Gold Sponsors Fraunhofer USA, IPG Photonics, Joining Technologies and Shermco Industries is what completes LAM’s success. We would also like to thank Silver Sponsors Rofin-Sinar, Laserline, Coherent and Bronze Sponsor Trumpf for their continued support and cooperation.

Workshop veterans and newcomers alike found plenty to pique their interest.

“I’m basically here to scout out laser-additive manufacturing to see what it’s about, see if it‘s something we may be interested in,” said senior staff engineer Dave Siddle of Kennametal in Latrobe, PA. “All the speakers have been very good; we have the ‘Wohlers Report,’ and it’s good to hear what he had to say in person.”

To learn about the workshop and find out when to register for next year’s event, visit: www.lia.org/lam

Wednesday, 29 February 2012 09:45

Industrial Laser Safety Officer Training

Written by

This course is hosted by LIA Corporate Member IPG Photonics Corporation, Midwest Operations. IPG is the world's leading provider of high power fiber lasers and fiber amplifiers that are revolutionizing performance and utility in a remarkable array of materials processing, telecommunications, medical and other advanced applications.

Course Overview

Lasers are used in a wide variety of industrial manufacturing operations. Laser processes such as laser cutting, drilling and welding of metals and other materials present unique hazards to the eye and skin that must be controlled. This course will address these hazards in detail and present methods of how to minimize these hazards. In addition, OSHA and other federal regulations, and consensus standards will be presented that address the issue of laser safety from a regulatory perspective.

This course is a 2-day non-mathematical approach designed to teach the duties of Laser Safety Officer as described in the ANSI Z136.1 Safe Use of Lasers standard to users of industrial lasers. Information on lasers and optics, bioeffects, beam and non-beam hazards, control measures and training requirements are covered. Emphasis is placed on laser safety program development and administration. This course meets all LSO training requirements outlined by ANSI and OSHA. This course is worth 2.0 BLS CM points by the Board of Laser Safety.

Who Should Attend

Any individuals using an industrial laser for welding, cutting, drilling, marking or etching that have been selected as the Laser Safety Officer for their company. This course is tailored to fit the needs of safety professionals, engineers, laser operators, technicians, and other professionals assigned the duties of Laser Safety Officer who are not required to perform hazard analysis calculations.

What You'll Learn

Experts from the Accredited Standards Committee Z136 Safe Use of Lasers provide up-to-date information on Federal, State and International laser safety regulations.

- Laser fundamentals and terminology
- Laser bioeffects
- Overview of laser exposure limits, and nominal hazard zones
- Laser control measures
- Selction of laser eye protection
- Laser safety program administration

Dates:

March 27-28, 2012

Course will be held at:


IPG Photonics Corporation - Midwest Operations
46695 Magellan Drive
Novi, MI 48377

Hotel Information:

Staybridge Suites
27000 Providence Parkway
Novi, MI 48374

For more information or to register, visit: www.lia.org/store/course/ILSOMI0312A

Wednesday, 08 February 2012 12:56

LAM 2012: 21st Century Laser Manufacturing

Written by

A future in which vital consumer and medical products and parts are made virtually from thin air with just metal or plastic powders and lasers could thrust the U.S. into the forefront of 21st century manufacturing.

Leading the charge in advocating such cutting-edge rapid manufacture and 3D printing is the Laser Institute of America, which holds its fourth annual Laser Additive Manufacturing (LAM) Workshop in Houston, TX on Feb. 29 – March 1. The educational showcase will feature keynote presentations by experts Terry Wohlers of Fort Collins, CO, and Dr. Ingomar Kelbassa of Germany’s Fraunhofer ILT and RWTH Aachen University.

LAM is a vital part of LIA’s suite of renowned conferences, along with the annual International Congress on Applications of Lasers and Electro-Optics (ICALEO®) and the newer Lasers for Manufacturing Event (LME). LIA’s signature events present the full spectrum of knowledge about rapid manufacture, from the research driving it, to how and when to use it — and employ it profitably.

The technology is gaining notice outside the rarefied realm of high-tech. Consider:

• The Economist featured the cover story “Print me a Stradivarius” in February 2010. In that issue, Wohlers noted that more than 20 percent of the output of 3D printers is final products; he expects this to rise to 50 percent by 2020.

• A column in the January 30 Wall Street Journal called laser additive manufacturing one of three keys to the new tech boom in the United States, imagining the “ ‘desktop’ printing of entire final products from wheels to even washing machines.”

Additive manufacturing permits designers to produce highly complex shapes and features difficult or impossible to produce any other way, notes Wohlers, who began his consulting firm Wohlers Associates 25 years ago. “This is allowing companies in aerospace, medical and other industries to explore more advanced designs that dramatically reduce material, cost, weight and carbon emissions,” he says.

A prime example is the “Airbike” built by the European Aerospace and Defense Group in Bristol, U.K. “Made of nylon but strong enough to replace steel or aluminum, it requires no conventional maintenance or assembly,” EADS says. It’s a sign additive processes are supplanting the traditional manufacturing model.

“Remember ‘Star Trek’?” Kelbassa asks. “ ‘Replicator: Tea. Earl Gray. Hot.’ The cup is there with the tea in it. It’s just there, additively manufactured. From the Stone Age, we have been producing parts subtractively (by) removing material … throwing away 90 percent. Now we are talking about… building up the part from scratch.”

Industrial applications within the past 10 years include the manufacturing of car bumpers with stereolithography and production of patient-specific dental bridges, implants and crowns using what Kelbassa calls selective laser melting.

LIA has retooled LAM this year to devote a full day to laser-based rapid manufacture beyond the more established practices of creating prototypes and repairing corrosion and wear. The workshop will spotlight advances in the power generation, aerospace, agriculture, automotive, military, marine, transportation, construction, and biomedical industries.

Register using discount code: PROTOTYPE and save $150 off your full conference registration. Simply click on the link below to register and save!

For more information, visit: www.lia.org/conferences/lam/attend

Thursday, 29 December 2011 09:08

LIA’s Industrial Laser Safety Officer Training

Written by

With lasers making unprecedented inroads into the manufacturing processes of various industries, the Laser Institute of America’s two-day on-site laser safety officer courses are a big hit as a unique resource for learning hazard prevention.

LIA held its most recent on-site Industrial Laser Safety Officer (ILSO) course Dec. 13-14 at IPG Photonics in Novi, Mich., with attendees learning the duties of laser safety officers (LSOs). Laser-based cutting, welding, drilling, and marking applications are being adopted with greater frequency, and manufacturers are scrambling to appoint and educate LSOs to ensure the safety of their personnel.

Among LIA’s broad repertoire of renowned laser safety resources, the on-site LSO course hosted by IPG provides a vital opportunity to connect with experts in the field. The December session — the fourth the LIA corporate member has hosted this year — was so popular that LIA Education Director Gus Anibarro had to turn away some prospective attendees.

Hosting the ILSO course at locations closer to industry hubs — for example, the automotive industry of the Midwest — is invaluable to firms that can’t send employees to LIA headquarters in Orlando, notes Mike Klos, IPG’s general manager of Midwest operations. “We provide the room, and at the end we give a demo with the high-powered laser in the back lab here. We say, ‘Hey, I know you don’t understand the 1 micron wavelength — it’s a little bit different, but we do have LSO training and highly recommend it if it’s not mandatory for your company.”

The highly focused course emphasizes the basics, says instructor Tim Hitchcock, “To help (attendees) understand the hazards of industrial laser use and how to establish a laser safety program to control these hazards.” The on-site model “helps the host provide a necessary service to their customers and allows the customers to focus on the essentials of laser safety for their particular work environment.”

Attendees get an overview of safety regulations, the bioeffects of lasers, proper control measures, and effective program administration. Also included with the course are LIA’s Laser Safety Guide, relevant ANSI Z136 Standard, LIA’s Guide to the Selection of Laser Eyewear and more.

The on-site ILSO sessions are tailored to fit the needs of safety professionals, engineers, laser operators, technicians, and other professionals assigned LSO duties without being required to perform hazard analysis calculations. The Dec. 13-14 workshop included attendees from Pratt & Whitney, Eagle Technologies, American Axle Manufacturing, and the Automatic Feed Company.

Going into this course, attendees can expect to learn about how to determine hazard zones, select the correct protective eyewear, and be informed on the best way to keep themselves and company personal as safe as possible. “I learned all of that, as well as exactly how exposure affects the eyes and skin, a good deal of technical terminology, and how the ANSI Z136.1 standard is set up to help develop a solid laser safety program,” says course attendee Josh Boyd, Controls Engineer at Automatic Feed Company, “through some examples of past accidents as told by our instructor, I also developed an even greater respect for the dangers that lasers can pose, even if they are lower power lasers”.

LIA, the recognized leader in laser advocacy and safety resources since 1968, is rapidly filling its 2012 calendar with industrial and medical laser safety officer courses.

For more information or to register, visit: www.lia.org/education/calendar

Wednesday, 21 December 2011 12:30

LAM 2012 - Laser Additive Manufacturing Workshop

Written by

The fourth-annual Laser Additive Manufacturing Workshop in Houston takes a bold leap forward in 2012 as the Laser Institute of America creates a special slate of instruction focused exclusively on rapid manufacturing.

Whereas the two-day session has centered primarily on laser-based rapid prototyping and powder and wire cladding to repair corrosion and wear, LAM 2012 will spend one day on those traditional applications and devote a full day to 21st century strides in sintering and 3D printing. The Feb. 29 – March 1 workshop convenes in Houston once again because of the laser’s vital role in the region’s oil and gas industries.

Embracing the Future

Renowned U.S. rapid-manufacture expert Terry Wohlers, who lent his expertise to The Economist’s February 2010 edition featuring a cover story titled “Print Me A Stradivarius,” has been invited to address attendees. In a story titled “The Printed World,” he noted that more than 20 percent of the output of 3D printers is final products; he expects this to rise to 50 percent by 2020.

“Additive manufacturing systems that produce parts in metal have progressed tremendously in 10 short years,” notes Wohlers, who began his consulting firm Wohlers Associates in Fort Collins, CO, 25 years ago. “Some of the parts approach the mechanical properties of wrought materials and exceed those of cast parts. This is not in all cases, but it is not uncommon.”

Additive manufacturing permits designers to produce highly complex shapes and features that would be difficult or impossible to produce any other way, he notes. “This is allowing companies in aerospace, medical and other industries to explore more advanced designs that dramatically reduce material, cost, weight and carbon emissions.”

A prime example is the “Airbike” built in March by the European Aerospace and Defense Group (EADS) in Bristol, U.K. The bike is so named because of Airbus’ reliance on the additive layer manufacturing process, EADS notes. “Made of nylon but strong enough to replace steel or aluminum, it requires no conventional maintenance or assembly,” EADS says on its website. “(The bike) is ‘grown’ from powder, allowing complete sections to be built as one piece; the wheels, bearings and axle being incorporated within the ‘growing’ process and built at the same time. The Airbike can be built to rider specification so requires no adjustment.”

Dr. Bill O’Neill of Cambridge University, who noted the Airbike during his presentation at LIA’s first Lasers for Manufacturing Event in September, said additive processes are supplanting the Victorian manufacturing model. Dr. Ingomar Kelbassa of Germany’s Fraunhofer ILT and RWTH Aachen University concurs.

“We’re not talking about rapid prototyping any longer; we are talking about rapid manufacturing out of metals, polymers, out of any kind of ceramics,” Kelbassa says. “This is a paradigm shift in manufacture. From the Stone Age, we have been producing parts subtractively; we are removing material. You are throwing away 90 percent. Subtractive manufacturing isn’t as effective as additive manufacturing in terms of saving material, time or money. Now we are talking about … building up the part from scratch.”

In other words, what was once the realm of science fiction has become reality.

“Remember ‘Star Trek’?” Kelbassa asks. “’Replicator: Tea. Earl Gray. Hot.’ The cup is there with the tea in it. It’s just there, additively manufactured.”

Laser Additive Offerings

Besides the Airbike, highly localized personalized laser additive manufacture has been explored with great success within the past 10 years, he notes. For example, larger parts such as bumpers can be manufactured additively stereolithography. And since 2002, Germany’s BEGO has been using what Kelbassa calls Selective Laser Melting (SLM) to produce patient-specific dental bridges, implants, and crowns.

“This was the first industrial implementation,” Kelbassa says. “From the material point of view, from the maturity point of view, from the technology readiness point of view, (SLM) is ready for industrial implementation.

Wohlers notes that CE certification for the process in Europe four years ago has allowed many European manufacturers to produce orthopedic implants using additive manufacturing. For instance, he says an estimated 15,000 acetabular hip cups manufactured in Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy have been implanted into patients.

“Earlier this year, the FDA approved the use of electron-beam melting for the production of a similar orthopedic product, which marks another milestone,” Wohlers says.

The possibilities are nearly endless. “It’s a pretty short process chain: All you need is the CAD data, all you need is powder, and if you have the CAD data and the powder additive you can produce the part,” Kelbassa says. He imagines a 24/7 global manufacturing process. For example, a Europe-based company with facilities in the Far East and South America can work in three eight-hour shifts: Upon completion of the first shift in Asia, data is transferred to Europe for a second shift, and after that shift the data is sent west again for the third shift.

At the moment, he says, part size is a restriction. And Wohlers notes the cost can be prohibitive, “but a number of service providers own machines and build parts for others.”

At LAM, both men will impress upon attendees that a new generation of engineers is required to take full advantage of what additive manufacturing has to offer.

Discover It At LAM

LAM will once again feature cutting-edge presentations and exhibits by platinum sponsor Alabama Laser, gold sponsors IPG Photonics Corporation, Fraunhofer USA and Joining Technologies, Inc., silver sponsors Coherent, Inc. and Laserline Inc., bronze sponsor TRUMPF, Inc. and others.

Wayne Penn, president of Alabama Laser, and Keith Parker, senior business development manager at Coherent, say they are “excited” to attend LAM 2012. Parker is considering presenting a paper on his firm’s new high-deposition procedure using 8 kilowatt lasers and a 24mm-wide beam to lay down 20mm clads in a single pass. The method could be valuable to the oil and gas industry in cladding the sort of massive shafts used in offshore rigs, he notes.

Looking ahead, Parker — a former F-14 Tomcat pilot — readily sees the possibilities additive manufacturing could offer the military. Imagine an aircraft carrier crew that needs to replace parts during a deployment but can’t take up valuable space on the ship with those spares. In fact, many parts encountered in military service are 40 or more years old; often the blueprints or manufacturers no longer exist, Parker says.

“So where do you get parts when you need them?” he asks. “In a lot of cases they really need to be able to build up those parts. If you had one of those (laser additive) machines on an aircraft carrier and something broke, you could get a CAD model and create it from scratch.” Aerospace, too, he notes, is a likely beneficiary of such technology, because of the complex 3D structures required for turbine engines.

To find out more about what to expect, read coverage of last year’s LAM workshop in the March-April 2011 issue of LIA’s newsletter, LIA Today, available online at: www.lia.org/subscriptions/lia_today

For more information about LAM 2012 and to register, visit: www.lia.org/conferences/lam

From attoseconds to zettawatts, the 30th-annual International Congress on Applications of Lasers & Electro-Optics looked once again to the future with another powerful conference packed with cutting-edge research from around the world.

The message of the Laser Institute of America’s premiere conference — which returned to LIA’s hometown of Orlando — was clear: The power of the laser is being leveraged enthusiastically and with great success in everything from micromachining to carbon nanotube-based cancer therapies to railway repair and concrete cutting. The next-generation applications are upon us, as lasers are being used with increasing precision to modify more and more delicate materials or tackle huge manufacturing and repair tasks. They’re not only cutting and etching stents, iPhone components and flexible glass substrates, they’re also repairing mining equipment.

ICALEO, always a collegial gathering of experts sharing knowledge via a full slate of short courses, plenary sessions, hundreds of research papers and posters, a business forum, and numerous spirited informal discussions outside the conference rooms, produced a number of highlights:

• LIA President Elect Dr. Reinhart Poprawe of Fraunhofer ILT who will take the reins from Stephen Capp, CEO of Laserage, in January, announced the election of Klaus Löffler of TRUMPF as 2012 president-elect.

• Dr. Berthold Leibinger earned The Arthur L. Schawlow Award in recognition for steering TRUMPF through innovation after innovation for 50 years. In his 25-minute luncheon address, he talked about visiting several U.S. laser companies in the 1970s in search of lasers that could cut metal, and how that quest led TRUMPF to begin building its own, more powerful lasers.

• LIA Executive Director Peter Baker honored IPG’s Bill Shiner as the father of the new Lasers for Manufacturing Event, a unique event held for the first time in Sept. 26-27 in Schaumburg, Ill.

• A global industry economic report by past President David Belforte indicated the laser world is continuing to bounce back with a vengeance since the 2008 recession.

• A spirited discussion of developments and opportunities in the so-called BRIC nations — Brazil, Russia, India and China.

• 140 first-time attendees were among the more than 500 total attendees and 56 vendors (including sponsors) from 26 countries.

• 227 presentations in addition to nine plenary sessions that addressed revolutionary technologies like quantum cascade lasers, dressed photons, novel beam splitters, and advances in micro and nano structuring.

Realizing LIA’s Mission

The annual ICALEO awards luncheon offered LIA’s leaders a chance to reflect on the year’s successes and thank members at all levels for their contributions.

“Team LIA is everybody … everybody in this room: all the staff, all the speakers, all the members, all the board people, everybody,” Baker enthused during the awards luncheon. “The trick is we work together to make something happen that we need. … We’ve had exciting times, we’re coming out of a difficult period, but we’re healthy, we’re meeting needs and we’re carrying out our mission.”

Capp echoed that sentiment in passing the reins: “As president of the LIA this past year, it has been a pleasure working with other members of the executive committee and the board, and it has also been a privilege working with Peter and his fine staff.”

ICALEO’s success was reflected in the reactions of veteran and new attendees alike. “(ICALEO) is a good presentation,” Bernhard Steiger of Germany’s Hochschule Mittweida said of his first visit to the conference. “The session about thermal lensing was very good. We look for different presentations around the world, and this was very new.”

At his third ICALEO, Lino Costa of the Center for Laser Applications at the University of Tennessee noted that “the highlights this year are in the areas of medical devices and photovoltaics. I’m working on microfluidics for biological applications; I’m mostly interested in the femtosecond machining. This (ICALEO) is the one I’ve liked most so far.”

The Meat of the Matter

With lasers becoming faster and more powerful, the range of intricate manufacturing applications is wide open, as the more than 200 ICALEO sessions demonstrated. Researchers shared the results of their efforts to innovate laser processes in such areas as:

• Femtosecond laser patterning of Mo thin film on flexible substrate for CIGS solar cells .

• Scribing of flexible glass substrates, which are vital to smart phones and tablets and can pave the way toward “e-paper.”

• Stabilizing copper welding using power-modulated green and infrared beams.

• Drilling with diode-pumped fiber and disc lasers with scalable output power as an alternative to flash lamp-pumped Nd:YAG lasers.

• Cutting and welding of carbon and glass fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites.

• Customized trepanning systems capable of micro machining metal and ceramic samples up to 1 mm thick and creating tapered through-holes with entrance diameters of 65 to 1,000 micrometers.

The plenary sessions offered two particularly noteworthy presentations.

In the opening plenary session, Dr. Hongjie Dai of Stanford University detailed novel prospects for carbon nanoscience, including a cancer-fighting procedure that uses lasers to heat nanotubes inserted into tumors. A handheld laser with a 3 cm beam passes near-infrared light through cells, preserving the healthy ones but killing the cancerous ones by heating the nanotubes.

At ICALEO’s end, Dr. Minlin Zhong of Tsinghua University detailed his seven visions for where laser manufacturing is headed, including greater understanding of how lasers and materials interact; how faster and more powerful units will reduce heat-affected zones and how lasers will be able to process “non-processible” materials and allow processing beyond current thickness limits.

“What I was surprised about while sorting out the papers this year (was that) the overall quality was very good,” noted Cencorp’s Henrikki Pantsar, chairman of the Laser Microprocessing Conference. That sentiment was shared by Precitec’s Markus Kogel-Hollacher, who raved, “As a judge of the student paper again this year, I really know the quality of the student papers, which were tremendously great.”

Congress General Chair Kunihiko Washio of Tokyo’s Paradism Laser Research was spotted at numerous presentations throughout ICALEO. “ICALEO has lived up to its reputation,” he asserted. “There is much progress on high peak-power, short-pulse lasers and the high-brightness fiber lasers, and also there are many new tactics using beam shaping or multiplexing.”

The Economic Outlook

This year, ICALEO’s business forum, moderated again by co-chairs Neil Ball of Directed Light Inc. and Sri Venkat of Coherent, focused on developments and opportunities in the so-called BRIC nations — Brazil, Russia, India and China. Prior to the panel discussion, Belforte, editor-in-chief of Industrial Laser Solutions, provided detailed industry figures from his annual review (figures that will go through one more round of revision before publication in January). Asia continues to dominate the market in terms of laser system installations, he said, noting that Japan and East Asia together account for 47 percent. He also noted the significant growth in the market for fiber lasers used for marking, engraving, and metal processing. Overall, he noted, global laser revenues were up about 13 percent to $1.828 billion, and laser system revenues were up about 15 percent to $7.017 billion.

“Marking and engraving traditionally has been the growth engine for the sale of lasers for the past 10 years or more,” Belforte reported. “It’s always been double-digit growth — to the order of 20 percent per year sometimes. Semiconductor and microprocessing were basically the only two industries that made it through the recession in reasonable shape; semiconductor came out of the recession in terrific shape. That’s the reason, along with microprocessing — which is industries like medical, surgical instruments, microelectronics — that those businesses snapped back quickly.”

During the panel discussion, Shiner, vice president of industrial markets for IPG Photonics, noted that IPG’s complete product line is manufactured in Russia, making that nation a major player on the horizon. “In the U.S. there’s an awful lot of issues and export problems we face; it’s very difficult to ship a laser from the United States because of our Commerce Department, the amount of paperwork and bureaucracy we have to go through,” he went on to say. “I’d like to level the playing field because I think it hurts American companies.”

Panelist Jyoti Mazumder of The University of Michigan’s CLAIM noted that in 2009, 250 lasers were sold to India’s diamond industry because the lasers can clean the gems. He also told of an agent who sold 45 rapid-prototyping systems in India in the past three years. “Another driving force (in India) is that when I graduated in the ‘70s, the total number of engineers produced in India was 32,000; last year there were half a million,” he pointed out.

Despite all the promising signs, panelist Wenwu Zhang of GE wants more growth.

“I don’t think laser has performed to its full potential, he said. “We celebrated the 50th anniversary last year but the global laser market is less than $8 billion. To me that’s really, really small. Compare that with other businesses, especially when you consider the talent pool in this business and the market volume of this business. It’s not proportionate. There’s something wrong with the overall strategy in this business. The production chain is too long, and the overall system cost is not optimized. We should cut that to one-fifth or even one-tenth to make this technology really fly. I hope I can help in that regard.”

Looking Ahead

As ICALEO 2011 wound down, many attendees made a point to stop and share a handshake and fond farewell with Baker, who as master of ceremonies presided over numerous meetings focusing on next year’s slate of LIA events.

“We had the wrapup meeting this morning, consisting of past chairs and people who’ve been coming to ICALEO for 10 or 20 years,” he said. “The feedback from them was that (this year’s ICALEO) was a major success, the quality of papers is high and the networking events were very successful. We’re maintaining our high plateau of quality.”

For Pantsar, ICALEO “is always the highlight of the year. The whole conference is a highlight; it’s one of the conferences that I enjoy the most because there’s the best networking here. You know so many people here and you spend as much time outside the conference room speaking to people as you do listening to the presentations. In that aspect it’s the best conference there is.” Or as Laser Materials Processing Conference chair Stefan Kaierle of Fraunhofer ILT summed up,  (ICALEO) is like a big family.”

From the welcome celebration to the president’s and vendor receptions to the closing plenaries, “ICALEO is like the golden thread that goes through the laser industry that pulls us all together; it really has made our industry,” Shiner said. “I always pose the question, ‘What if there wasn’t an ICALEO?’ At the other shows you don’t have the opportunity in one venue to get together and meet the people. I can grab Bill O’Neill from Cambridge University, and I’m going to drag him over to Rolls-Royce; you can’t do that any other place.”

Perhaps Schawlow Award winner Leibinger summed ICALEO up best:

“The variety of uses of the laser for different processes shows the unbelievable flexibility of this tool. We are still at the beginning. I envy all the young people here (who are) able to work in such a challenging field, with its great opportunities. It’s wonderful to be able to work in this field. I thank the Laser Institute of America for presenting this platform to the people who have the privilege to attend this meeting. It is wonderful to be able to contribute to the development of the technology in this field.”

ICALEO 2012 will return to Anaheim, California, from Sept. 23-27. For updates on sponsorship opportunities and the educational program, or to register to attend, visit: www.icaleo.org

The International Congress on Applications of Lasers & Electro-Optics (ICALEO®), which has a 29-year history as the conference where researchers and end-users meet to review the state-of-the-art in laser materials processing, laser microprocessing and nanomanufacturing as well as predict where the future will lead, will be held Oct. 23-27 at the Hilton located in Walt Disney World® Resort in Orlando, FL. From its inception, ICALEO has been devoted to the field of laser materials processing at macro, micro and nanoscales and is viewed as the premier source of technical information in the field.

Each year ICALEO features areas of topical interest. This year’s featured sessions include diode lasers for processing and pumping, laser process monitoring and control, laser processing of biological materials, lasers in nanotechnology and environmental technology, laser hybrid processing, laser manufacturing for alternative energy sources and laser business development.

“The ICALEO Program Committee has put together yet another strong program with a high number of contributions from researchers from both academia and industries all over the world in areas of traditional and emerging laser applications,” explained ICALEO Congress General Chair Kunihiko Washio of Paradigm Laser Research Limited, Tokyo, Japan.

Plenary Session

This year’s plenary session will feature topics on material nanoscience, photonics and technologies for evolutional innovation with a keynote given by Dr. Hongjie Dai, a professor at the Department of Chemistry and Laboratory for Materials, Stanford University. The title of the keynote is “The Story and Prospects of Carbon Nanoscience and Technologies for Future Exciting Applications,” and will give an overview of graphene- and carbon-nanotube-based nanoscience and their evolutional future applications. The following presentations will cover fascinating topics on conversion of cement material to transparent metals and superconductors, quantum cascade lasers and their applications, as well as the magic of the dressed photons and their applications such as nanofabrication. This is one session you should not miss!

Laser Materials Processing

ICALEO 2011 will offer three conferences covering an expanding array of laser applications. The Laser Materials Processing Conference (LMP), organized by Conference Chair Stefan Kaierle of Fraunhofer ILT, Aachen, Germany, continues its theme on high speed and flexible macroscopic laser processing applications, equipment and systems. The laser is a fundamental tool in today’s industrial production. The progress in high brightness processes brought on by advances and improvements in high power fiber, disk and direct diode lasers will be prominently featured.

“New enthusiasm is spreading around and the companies in the laser field tell new success stories of growth and expansion. This appears to be a fantastic starting point for ICALEO’s 30th year,” said Kaierle. “The LMP conference program is full of excellent contributions covering 18 sessions in many different application fields. In particular, a large amount of abstracts have been submitted to welding and rapid prototyping processes like selective laser melting and laser metal deposition. The understanding of processes in terms of modeling as well as quality monitoring and control are well covered.”

Laser Microprocessing Conference

The Laser Microprocessing Conference (LMF) will be chaired by Henrikki Pantsar of Cencorp Corporation and will cover processes and systems for microscopic applications, especially those that take advantage of the small feature sizes and high precision offered by picosecond and femtosecond ultrafast lasers and wavelength optimization. As the overall economical setting is improving, more efforts are being directed towards research and development to discover future possibilities and maintain growth through innovation. For many years, trends that are visible in the conference have turned out to be great business opportunities during the successive years.

LMF will feature more than 80 technical papers and seven invited papers and a variety of application-oriented sessions such as photovoltaics, thin film processing, medical devices and biomedical applications, etc., highlighting the versatility of laser microprocessing.

Trends emanating this year include laser surface modification, structuring, processing of transparent materials and different micro deposition processes. General aspects of micromachining and ablation are well represented as well as thin film processing, photovoltaics, drilling, new optical concepts, laser sources and many others. The presentations introduce the latest and greatest advancements in their respective fields, presented by world’s leading companies and research organizations.

Nanomanufacturing Conference

Yongfeng Lu, University of Nebraska – Lincoln, and Xianfan Xu, Purdue University, will co-chair the Nanomanufacturing Conference. The conference will explore topics in the still emerging, but rapidly advancing, field of nanotechnology and the role various lasers can play. Much progress has been achieved in laser direct writing for nano-machinning, nanofabrication using femtosecond lasers and laser-assisted growth of nanostructures. This conference will highlight research in emerging nanomanufacturing technologies in 3-D micro/nanomachining, 2-photon lithography, digital fabrication, nanoparticle formation, surface nanostructuring and laser-assisted growth and expitaxy. These studies encompass a variety of applications, including photonic crystals, nanofluidic devices, opto-fluidic and nanoscale plasmonic structures.

Business Forum, Panel Discussion, Closing Plenary

This year’s Business Forum and Panel Discussion, a popular feature at ICALEO, organized by Neil Ball of Directed Light Inc. and Sri Venkat of Coherent Inc., will focus on photonics markets, opportunities and trends in the rapidly growing economies of BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India and China) nations. The panel discussion portion will address what industries within these nations are embracing, industrial laser technology, what applications have gained acceptance and what the future holds for the expansion of laser technology in their regions. In addition, insight with regard to regulatory issues such as government funding and policy towards the photonics industry will be provided. An overview of educational institutions and research centers will also be addressed.

The Laser Solutions Short Courses, organized by Silke Pflueger of Laserline, Inc., are ideal for those who want to receive a complete overview on the state-of-the-art in specific areas of interest to participants. They are being held the day before the main conference, enabling all attendees to participate without time restrictions during the technical sessions. The short courses have been selected to complement the papers offered at ICALEO by offering fundamentals and in-depth information on measurement techniques, systems and processes. They are taught by industrial photonics experts, and offer ICALEO attendees valuable insight into details not usually covered by the latest results presented in the technical papers – for no additional fee.

The Closing Plenary session is a joint LMP and LMF session featuring strategies, limits and challenges for advanced laser processing with two invited and three contributed presentations. LMP Chair Stefan Kaierle will give the first invited presentation on “Strategies of R&D and International Networking Towards the Evolution of Future Laser Materials Processing.” Following this, a distinguished and veteran researcher, Prof. Minlin Zhong of Tsinghua University, China, will give the second invited presentation on “Vision on Frontiers of Laser Manufacturing Research.” The following three contributed presentations will discuss various approaches towards realizing higher-throughput and more efficient laser materials processing.

Networking

The opening day of ICALEO features and evening reception hosted by LIA President Stephen Capp. Meet the LIA Executive Committee, Board of Directors and ICALEO Chairs. Join the LIA staff and mingle with old friends at this exciting event!

The Vendor Reception is a popular venue for attendees to learn about the latest products, meet the industry representatives who are working in the laser applications market and will be a valuable networking opportunity.

“One of the key benefits ICALEO offers has always been the great social atmosphere and networking opportunities for the attendees. This will prove particularly helpful in these turbulent times brought on by factors that have nothing to do with lasers!” said Washio.

The Advance Program, which gives details on conference events, speakers and topics, is available to download at no cost at: www.icaleo.org

Wednesday, 05 October 2011 09:24

LIA's LME — A Homerun for the Laser Industry!

Written by

Laser-based manufacturing got a significant shot in the arm in September as the Laser Institute of America drew nearly 70 exhibitors and over 800 experts, advocates and practitioners to its first-ever Lasers for Manufacturing Event.

LIA, the leading laser applications and safety authority, created LME to do something no other U.S. based organization has done: convene the laser-manufacturing brain trust to educate representatives from various industries about how to improve efficiency and profitability with laser welding, cladding, drilling and cutting technology. The show, held Sept. 27-28 at the Renaissance Schaumburg Convention Center in Schaumburg, IL, drew not only manufacturers located near the venue but attendees from other countries including Russia, Japan, Egypt, Korea and Turkey.

“This show is helping to create good-paying jobs, it’s helping to improve American competitiveness and it’s educating people on the technology they need,” asserted LIA Executive Director Peter Baker. “We are doing what the president and the government are only talking about doing.”

The Event struck a balance between educational tracks and opportunities for laser-equipment vendors to give one-on-one advice to those seeking guidance on laser applications for the automotive, aerospace, medical device and power generation sectors. A special “technology showcase theater” allowed more than 40 industry players to present vital information to attendees in 10-to-20-minute segments. Top-tier firms like IPG Photonics, TRUMPF Inc, Laser Mechanisms, Laserline, Lincoln Electric, Fraunhofer, Coherent, ABB, Laserage and others shared decades of expertise in solving a host of manufacturing problems with lasers.

“It’s a good opportunity for everybody to learn about all the technologies in the same place,” said Octavio Islas, an automotive product engineer with Magna/Cosma in Mexico. “You can get a lot of information from all the suppliers. If you have any specific requirement, you have people with a lot of knowledge and experience, and they can tell you about your application and all the details.”

Critical to LME’s value were four one-hour sessions detailing the types of lasers available, how to assemble them into powerful manufacturing systems, how to choose the proper processes for maximizing return on investment and how to use lasers safely.

Furthermore, four half-hour keynote addresses gave attendees up-to-the-minute developments in how lasers are being employed in 21st-century manufacturing. Auto-industry consultant Mariana Forrest, who spent 30 years at Chrysler, provided a survey of the industry’s increasing embrace of lasers to create more and more parts. GE Aviation consulting engineer Todd Rockstroh discussed how lasers produce highly sophisticated aviation turbine blades and overcame maintenance issues for the B1 bomber fleet in the early 1990s. Additive manufacturing expert Bill O’Neill of Cambridge University piqued attendees’ interest with envelope-pushing applications such as the “Airbike,” built by the European Aeronautic Defense and Space Company from the ground up solely with lasers and nylon powder. And Roberto Alzaga of Medtronic addressed how lasers are perfect for creating highly sensitive, highly regulated medical devices.

“It was a very successful start,” said LIA President Stephen Capp, CEO of Laserage in Waukegan, IL “The people I talked to were very pleased with the ability to come and just focus on equipment vendors that are very industry specific. I was very pleased at the turnout and we’re looking forward to putting together a bigger and better event next year.” LME 2012 will be held October 23-24, 2012 in Schaumburg, IL. More information can be found at: www.laserevent.org

LME was held just a month before LIA’s annual International Congress on the Applications of Lasers & Electro-Optics (ICALEO), which will be held Oct. 23-27 in Orlando, FL. The so-called “Super Bowl” of the laser industry will feature dozens of expert speakers. Visit www.icaleo.org to register or learn more about the LIA’s full range of laser-safety publications, courses and online resources.

In a letter of support U.S. Senator Bill Nelson (D) Florida thanks the Laser Institute of America “for taking the lead in providing the education, practical examples and connection to world class laser and system manufacturers which LME provides.” He said “it is clear that increasing the use of lasers for manufacturing can immediately and practically help to improve U.S. competitiveness, increase innovation and create well paid jobs, all of which are important priorities for our nation” and states that “industrial lasers are making such a positive impact on Aerospace, Automobile, Medical and other areas of manufacturing.”

LIA’s Lasers for Manufacturing Event will be held in Schaumburg, IL on September 27th and 28th

The Event provides basic training on lasers and systems, courses on laser processes including welding and laser additive manufacturing, videos on laser processing and examples of parts made by lasers.

“This will be a focused, optimized Event for current and potential laser users in the manufacturing community,” said LIA’s Executive Director Peter Baker. “No longer will manufacturing technologists seeking laser knowledge and technology have to comb through a large, traditional machining show searching for laser manufacturing! At LME, 100% of the exhibitors will be laser and system manufacturers, 100% of the attendees will be manufacturing people who want to use and learn to use lasers and 100% of the educational content is customized to the needs of those attendees. LME will provide an optimum interaction between users and suppliers in a compact, focused Event.”

“LME will be the show for laser applications,” said LIA’s Marketing Director Jim Naugle. “If you want to learn what a laser can do, how much it costs, how to justify the purchase, this is the go-to source. We want the novice user and the experienced user to learn the practical applications made possible by lasers.” LIA’s intention is that the new Event “satisfies a need for exhibitors to have a laser application/manufacturing exhibit for lasers and related equipment only,” Naugle said. “And, it satisfies a need for attendees to learn how to make money with lasers.”

LIA believes that this event will provide the optimum atmosphere designed to enhance attendees’ interaction with laser manufacturing experts.

For more information, visit: www.lia.org/conferences/laserevent

The Applied Research Lab at the Pennsylvania State University will host the fall meeting of the Laser Institute of America Mid-Atlantic Chapter on October 12, 2011 at 5 p.m. in their State College, PA facility.

The meeting coincides with the 25th anniversary celebration of the creation of the Laser Processing Division at the Applied Research Lab. The Laser Processing Division, which is one of the premier applied laser materials processing laboratories within the United States, is hosting an Open House throughout the day to highlight recent advances in laser processing technology and the newly renovated processing laboratory. The event will include an optional tutorial session on laser material processing, several presentations highlighting the development and application of advanced laser processing technology, laboratory tours and demonstrations of laser deposition for additive manufacturing and portable repair, hybrid laser arc welding, and advanced micro-processing. Presentations during the Open House will begin with a keynote address on Additive Manufacturing by Ms. Agnes Klucha of Pratt & Whitney’s Engineering Integrated Solutions Group.

LIA Chapter chairperson, Sarah Boisvert, a Fellow of the Laser Institute of America and co-founder of Potomac Photonics, Inc. notes “organizers Dr. Ted Reutzel and Dr. Richard Martukanitz of ARL have put together a strong program. This meeting promises to be an exciting event, with presentations by industry leaders that will include a fundamental perspective of ultra-short laser processing, advances in beam delivery optics and laser technology in the photovoltaic industry. As usual, we will conclude the meeting with a networking reception for further interaction among participants.”

Both the Open House and LIA chapter meeting are open free of charge to attendees, but pre-registration is required. For additional information on attending the Open House visit the website: www.arl.psu.edu/laserprocessing.htm

Noted GE aviation consultant engineer Todd Rockstroh will be a featured speaker at the Laser Institute of America’s (LIA) inaugural Lasers for Manufacturing Event (LME) in September, detailing how lasers have steadily been asked to perform more intricate aviation production tasks over the past three decades.

Among the topics Rockstroh will address during his 30-minute educational session at LME will be the various applications of lasers in the manufacture of vital components of jet and gas-turbine engines. He will detail research that arose from — and solved — issues in the production and maintenance of jet-engine fans, compressors and combusters.

For example, he will detail the pivotal role high pulse energy lasers had in solving a critical operational issue afflicting the B1 bomber fleet in the 1990s. After intensive collaborative research, GE, the Air Force and Battelle Memorial Institute of Columbus, Ohio, found that laser shock processing (LSP) helped prevent damage to the leading edges of stage one fan blades by producing a deep compressive effect that halted the propagation of cracks. Previously, if a blade had been damaged on a mission, ground crews would have to crawl into each of the plane’s four engines to examine each blade of the stage one fans; the two-to-four-hour inspection could result in the plane being grounded up to three days while a replacement part was sought. LSP has dramatically lengthened the maintenance cycle.

In the 2000s, Rockstroh explains, the aviation industry embraced nanosecond and picosecond lasers when developers used them as part of the process of milling cooling holes in the complex shapes of advanced gas turbine blades. “GE has now installed over a dozen laser milling workstations into our supply chains,” he says.

As he notes in his presentation, the aviation industry adopted lasers in the 1980s as the most cost-effective way to drill shallow-angle holes in cast turbine superalloys. Ruby and Nd:YAG lasers drilled precise holes in seconds. Now, although holes for today’s better-performing engines are more often produced with electro-discharge drilling, lasers are still vital in making multihole aviation components like combustion liners and exhaust ducts. These parts require 10,000 to more than 100,000 holes. “Laser drilling is the only cost-effective means of producing high-volume output,” Rockstroh notes.

He will round out his presentation with a look at direct metal laser deposition of an upcoming gas turbine fuel circuit design. GE will test the additive-manufacturing technique, which uses metal powder, in 2012 with the intent of using it in full-scale production by 2014.

“Additive manufacturing is a huge opportunity for U.S. industries, defense and otherwise,” Rockstroh noted in a recent interview for the Laser Institute of America’s newsletter, LIA TODAY. “The Air Force has got it on their road map to start some larger programs in the ManTech realm.”

LME, to be held in Schaumburg, IL, on Sept. 27-28, is the first event of its kind, designed to feature a hands-on look at laser-manufacturing applications and equipment in a highly interactive setting showcasing the work of cutting-edge laser companies.

For more information or to register to attend, visit: www.LaserEvent.org

The Laser Institute of America (LIA) will hold its inaugural Lasers for Manufacturing Event (LME) on September 27th and 28th in Chicago.

In order to help U.S. manufacturers to modernize and upgrade their technology and be competitive in the global economy, the Event is designed to fill a gap by providing designers and manufacturers everything they need to understand lasers and laser systems and how to employ them effectively and profitably.

The Event provides basic training on lasers and systems, courses on laser processes including welding and laser additive manufacturing, videos on laser processing and examples of parts made by lasers.

The world’s leading laser and system manufacturers such as IPG, TRUMPF and many others will exhibit at the event and will have laser manufactured parts on their booths, and experts there to explain the features to attendees. A special feature of the event will be 10, 15 and 20 minute presentations by exhibitors on the advantages of their technology in a theater directly on the show floor.

“This will be a focused, optimized Event for current and potential laser users in the manufacturing community,” said LIA’s Executive Director Peter Baker. “No longer will manufacturing technologists seeking laser knowledge and technology have to comb through a large, traditional machining show searching for laser manufacturing! At LME, 100% of the exhibitors will be laser and system manufacturers, 100% of the attendees will be manufacturing people who want to use and learn to use lasers and 100% of the educational content is customized to the needs of those attendees. LME will provide an optimum interaction between users and suppliers in a compact, focused Event.”

“LME will be the show for laser applications,” said LIA’s Marketing Director Jim Naugle. “If you want to learn what a laser can do, how much it costs, how to justify the purchase, this is the go-to source. We want the novice user and the experienced user to learn the practical applications made possible by lasers.” LIA’s intention is that the new Event “satisfies a need for exhibitors to have a laser application/manufacturing exhibit for lasers and related equipment only,” Naugle said. “And, it satisfies a need for attendees to learn how to make money with lasers.”

A core feature of all LIA exhibits will continue with an emphasis on complementary expertise available online via its laser insights webpage (http://www.laserinstitute.org/laserinsights). Those who access the page can quickly learn about the latest trends in laser-based additive manufacturing, arc welding, machining, surface texturing, diagnostics and other areas in which lasers play a significant role.

LIA believes that this event will provide the optimum atmosphere designed to enhance attendees’ interaction with laser manufacturing experts.

To learn about the educational offerings, understand key benefits of exhibiting and preview what major companies have commited, visit http://www.laserevent.org or call 1.800.34Laser.

One show, one voice, one mission — understanding laser technology. Don’t be left out!

About LIA

Laser Institute of America (LIA) is the professional society for laser applications and safety serving the industrial, educational, medical, research and government communities throughout the world since 1968. LIA is the secretariat and publisher of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Z136 series of laser safety standards. For more information, visit http://www.laserinstitute.org

February 16-17, 2011
Sheraton North Houston Hotel • Houston, TX USA
www.laserinstitute.org/LAM

LIA's 3rd Laser Additive Manufacturing Workshop (LAM) will bring industry specialists, executives, users and researchers from around the world to show how cladding and rapid manufacturing can be applied effectively and affordably to today's manufacturing challenges. This workshop will have significant impact on the widespread industrial implementations of laser additive manufacturing.

General Chair: Paul Denney - Lincoln Electric
Sponsor Chair: Bill Shiner - IPG Photonics

Program Committee:

Jim Sears - South Dakota School of Mines & Technology
Rob Scudamore - TWI
John Hunter - Carpenter Powder Products
Milan Brandt - RMIT University
Ingomar Kelbassa - RWTH Aachen University
Thierry Marchione - Technogenia, Inc.
Wayne Penn - Alabama Laser
Silke Pflüger - Laserline, Inc.
Bill Shiner - IPG Photonics

Registration includes two full days admission to the Plenary Session, Technical Sessions, Networking Luncheons and Exhibitor Reception.

Industry experts from the automotive, aerospace, oil and gas, biomedical, construction and other fields will converge to hear LAM's vast potential. Additive manufacturing is a very broad topic area and at this point is hot in a number of industries.

Join us to hear LAM Plenary speakers Minlin Zhong from Tsinghua University share his overview on Laser Additive Manufacturing in China, and David L. Bourell from University of Texas/Austin discuss the history of rapid prototyping to direct manufacturing.

Featuring Topics on:

* Keynote Day 1: Overview of Laser Additive Manufacturing in China - Prof. Dr. Minlin Zhong,Tsinghua University, Beijing, China
* Laser Additive Manufacturing for Aerospace, Automotive, BioMedical, DOD, Material Processes & Systems, Heavy Equipment, Agriculture, Offshore Oil & Gas, Mining, and Power Generation
* New Cladding Techniques for Component Repair and General Manufacturing
* Powder Specifications, Emerging Applications, High Deposition Cladding, Turbine Repair, Selective Laser Melting Technology
* New Success Stories, ROI and more

Industries Represented:

* Oil and Gas Industries
* Aerospace
* Agriculture
* Automotive
* Military
* Powder Production
* Marine
* On- and Off-Highway Transportation
* Power generation
* Construction/Steel
* Hardfacing
* Bio-Medical
* Tooling, Dies and Molds

Sponsors & Exhibitors

* Alabama Laser
* IPG Photonics
* Coherent
* Fraunhofer IWS
* Laserline
* Joining Technologies
* Trumpf
* Optomec
* POM Group
* Stratonics

Exhibitors

* American Laser Enterprises, LLC
* Carpenter Powder Products
* HIGHYAG Lasertechnologie GmbH
* Irepa Laser
* LASERVISION USA
* North American Hoganas
* Precitec, Inc.
* Preco, Inc
* RPM and Associates, Inc.
* TECHNOGENIA/Lasercarb Technology
* Titanova Inc
* Wall Colmonoy Corporation

Hotel Info

Sheraton North Houston at George Bush Intercontinental

15700 John.F. Kennedy Blvd.
Houston, Texas 77032 USA
Phone:  1.281.442.5100
Fax:  1.281.987.9130
Toll-free:  1.866.716.8134

All accommodations will be at the Sheraton North Houston at George Bush Intercontinental, with special discount rates for speakers, workshop attendees and guests. Please call +1.281.442.5100, identify yourself as a LAM Workshop ($99 Rate) event attendee to receive a discounted rate. After January 24, 2011, group rates cannot be guaranteed and reservations will be made only on a space-available basis.

For program information, please contact This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , call +1.407.380.1553, or visit our website at www.laserinstitute.org/LAM

Copyright © 2018 Prototype Today ®. All rights reserved.

|   Privacy Policy |   Terms & Conditions |   Contact Us |

All trademarks and registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

Additive Manufacturing Today