Joining Technologies

Joining Technologies (11)

Wednesday, 12 December 2012 09:30

Joining Technologies Now Offering ID Cladding

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Joining Technologies, Inc., an innovator in industrial laser applications, announces that it has expanded its additive manufacturing capabilities to include internal diameter (ID) cladding. Together with its partners Fraunhofer ILT, Pallas Oberflaechentechnik GmbH & Co KG and Laserline, Inc., Joining Technologies has installed a specialized ID cladding station. While laser cladding has gained wide acceptance as a cost effective way to add wear or corrosion-resistant coatings, or to repair worn-out or mis-machined parts, most of the cladding to date has been limited to easy-to-reach external part features. The new ID cladding station is a technological leap forward.

“The technique is ideal for adding service life to oil and gas equipment, pumps, sleeves and extruder components,” remarks Tim Biermann, director of the Joining Technologies Research Center (JTRC). “Also, we expect other industries will come to us seeking the ID cladding process for their applications.”

This laser additive technique can be used with a wide range of materials, including nickel-, cobalt- or iron-based alloys, as well as carbide-matrix compounds. The new ID cladding head, mounted to a CNC handling system, can process internal diameters as small as 2.75 inches, with a maximum insertion depth of 500 millimeters. Double-sided access means IDs as long as 1000 mm can be clad.

Joining Technologies provides laser cladding services at its facility in East Granby, Connecticut.  The company can perform robotic and Cartesian laser additive processes for components ranging from the very small, up to 72 inches diameter, 40 feet in length, and 6 tons in weight.

Headquartered in East Granby, CT, Joining Technologies is an innovator in precision fusion processes, including laser welding and electron beam welding, laser additive manufacturing, and weld system design and integration. The company’s extraordinary engineering talent continues to develop economical solutions for joining metal components primarily in the medical device, sensors, aerospace, military, energy, and firearms industries. Joining Technologies has created a corporate culture that rewards innovation and teamwork, and continues to invest in infrastructure, making it the most highly evolved and reliable operation of its kind.

For more information, visit: www.joiningtech.com/pages/cladding.html

A quality system rigorous enough to support the medical device industry is a necessary component of any welding company doing business in that sector. But just exactly what does that include? A little bit of everything, it turns out. From IQ/OQ/PC (installation qualification/ operational qualification/ performance qualification) documentation, to adherence to ISO 13485 quality management standards, to compliance with FDA good manufacturing practices; quality procedures and documentation pervade the entire organization.

Ensuring that welding processes meet necessary quality standards is relatively simple. Work with an established welding firm having robust engineering resources that are involved from prototype to production and FDA submission. Firms with these capabilities can offer help in selecting materials and designing weld joints to improve functionality while ensuring a stable manufacturing process.

IQ/OQ/PQ documents the process and equipment

IQ/OQ/PQ (installation qualification/operational qualification/production qualification) is a complete verification of equipment and process protocol often required by medical device companies, and performed by each supplier. One particularly rigorous method of documenting the production process is known as “alphabet soup”. With this method everything that happens to that component gets documented – for example, which machine it is run on, what inspections will be conducted and at what frequency, etc. To ensure the process is sound, the documentation may also include a capability study and gauge repeatability and reproducibility to prove out any variances in setup and operator factors.
 
Each IQ/OQ/PQ is conducted to suit the requirements of the customer, and the process is massaged as needed to match hardware functionality. For example, a validation procedure may demonstrate that the development meets engineering requirements and acceptance criteria for nominal settings on a sample set of components. A statistical analysis must be carried out for each process step.

After the detailed work is completed, to ensure regulatory compliance it is essential that the supplier prepare and maintain the applicable machinery and equipment qualification reports for auditing purposes. No structural changes may be made to the equipment without first notifying the customer and evaluating whether a requalification is necessary.

ISO 13485 certification

An important aspect of the medical device quality support story is the ISO 13485 Medical Device Standard, which outlines a comprehensive quality management system for the design and manufacture of medical devices. Subcontract manufacturers who achieve this certification can demonstrate that they are processing parts to the same rigorous standards as major medical device manufacturers.

ISO 13485 involves the development of controls to ensure product safety with a focus on risk management and design control activities during product development. For implantable devices, there are specific inspection and traceability requirements; sterile medical devices require verification that corrective and preventive actions will actually be effective.

To gain the certification, the welding service provider generally conducts an internal quality audit to ensure it meets the standards, and then contracts with a third party for the actual registration audit. The company then trains its own internal quality auditors who work to maintain the standards.

Joining Technologies decided to pursue ISO 13485 certification as a way of showing that it processes parts to the same standards as its medical customers. The company was already certified to quality management standards under NADCAP (National Aerospace and Defense Contractors Accreditation Program) and AS9100, so the move to ISO 13485 was a natural step.

Food and Drug Administration requirements

According to the FDA’s Quality System (QS) Regulation/Medical Device Good Manufacturing Practices, “Manufacturers must establish and follow quality systems to help ensure that their products consistently meet applicable requirements and specifications.” Quality systems for FDA-regulated medical devices are known as current good manufacturing practices (CGMPs). Over the years, CGMPs for medical devices have been revised to include design controls, becoming more closely aligned with the international standards found in ISO 9001 and ISO 13485.

In 1997, the FDA revised the CGMP requirements for medical devices and incorporated them into a quality system (QS) regulation called Medical Devices; Current Good Manufacturing Practice (CGMP) Final Rule; Quality System Regulation, found in 21 CFR Parts 808, 812, and 820. While not regulating exactly how a manufacturer should produce specific devices, the QS regulation sets out a framework to be followed, requiring  manufacturers to use “good judgment” when developing their quality system and applying the QS sections that are specific to their products and operations.

Welding engineering capabilities – from prototyping through FDA submission

Medical device welding qualification is a team effort. Having a dedicated project manager along with an experienced engineering team can give great peace of mind to the customer who will assemble and sell the complete medical device. An important factor in developing and implementing a quality welding process is to ensure that the engineering team gets involved in the earliest stages. Being involved from prototype to production and FDA submission allows the development engineers to provide input on functionality and the redesign of joints, if necessary, to meet quality objectives.

The best approach is to work with a welding firm that gives its customer access to its processes. Medical device developers can then see how their part gets welded and be involved throughout the qualification and production stages. Of course, this kind of open access policy must be coupled with a strong intellectual property (IP) program so that the customer’s IP is always protected.

Maintaining a flexible approach in the joining process, including the ability to access a variety of fusion techniques, helps provide optimal solutions based on part design and geometry. Companies offering electron beam, laser and traditional welding techniques within the same facility have a clear advantage over those that are limited to, for example, just laser welding.

Quality systems for the welding of medical devices rely on a variety of set standards. A project is most likely to succeed when a medical device manufacturer works with an engineering firm that can perform feasibility studies, process development, validation and certification, systems engineering and integration, and full scale production.

For more information, visit: www.joiningtech.com

Joining Technologies, Inc., an innovator in industrial laser applications, announces that it will showcase its welding services and capabilities at the Laser Institute of America’s Lasers for Manufacturing Event™ (LME™), which takes place October 23-24, 2012, at the Renaissance Schaumburg Convention Center Hotel, in Schaumburg, IL.

Joining Technologies will be highlighting its capabilities in laser welding, laser cladding of metal alloys, laser cutting, and laser system integration. Known as a problem solver to many, Joining Technologies engineering staff is widely for developing the most advanced and economical solutions for joining components in the medical device industry, sensors and controls, alternative energy, and aerospace.Stop by the booth to discuss how Joining Technologies increases quality and decreases lead time. See how Joining Technologies uses its innovative laser cladding of metal powder alloys to enhance, repair, or freeform material for applications in aerospace, power generation, valve and OEM-supplied components. The precision laser cladding processes accomplish virtually unlimited build-up heights in complex geometric dimensions.

Visitors to the LME event can also participate in LIA’s co-located Laser Welding & Joining Workshop, which brings together industry specialists from around the world with the goal of applying laser materials joining technologies to today’s manufacturing challenges and opportunities. The workshop will offer quality technical sessions and networking opportunities to discuss equipment and applications with top laser industry leaders.

For more information, visit: www.joiningtech.com or www.lia.org/conferences/laserevent

Joining Technologies, Inc., an innovator in industrial laser applications, announces that Joining Technologies Research Center (JTRC) is now offering Application Laboratory Days (AppLab Day™) for engineers interested in investigating projects that might benefit from laser additive manufacturing.

AppLab Day™ sessions will be held at JTRC’s state-of-the-art laser additive manufacturing research and development facility in East Granby, CT. Guided by JTRC’s laser additive experts, design engineers are able to conduct their own research, using JTRC equipment to create and analyze samples.

Hand in hand with Joining Technologies’ skilled researchers, engineers participating in the AppLab Day™ will learn first-hand how the laser additive process works and see how laser cladding of metal powder alloys can help enhance, repair, or freeform material in aerospace, power generation, valve and OEM-supplied components.

“JTRC’s new AppLab Day™ helps bridge the gap between university-level research and shop floor production laser cladding,” said Tim Biermann, director of research and development for JTRC. “Working with our research experts, design engineers can learn how laser cladding can help improve existing processes, or even create new products and processes.”

After conducting research in the applications laboratory, Joining Technologies can continue to help customers through in-depth research process, to the process evaluation and qualification phase, and finally into full scale production.

For more information, visit: www.joiningtech.com/jtrc/applabday.html

Joining Technologies, Inc., an innovator in industrial laser applications, announces new features and functionality to its innovative Infinite Web® all-in-one coil joiner, a non-contact splicing process that incorporates laser cutting and welding with a single head. The new features enable the splicing of titanium coils, as well as splicing on a 15 degree bias as an alternative to forming perpendicular joints. The bias increases the splice’s effective strength by increasing material at the weld joint, which further enhances the life cycle of downstream equipment by staging the arrival of the welds.

The Infinite Web® dramatically increases throughput, with some customers reporting a greater than 33 percent increase in plant-wide productivity resulting from improved efficiency and capabilities. With the ability to service multiple converting lines, the Infinite Web® is a truly mobile, stand-alone system requiring only an electrical input and minimal operator involvement. The industrial PC-based control system features a touch screen interface, predefined programs for selected alloys, and proprietary self-diagnostics to ensure optimal uptime.

Designed by welders to handle material thicknesses from 0.002-inch to 0.040-inch, the Infinite Web® uses coaxial optics to verify proper positioning and provide precise and accurate splices. Both cutting and welding operations are automatic and non-contact.

“It’s a quantum leap from the splicing equipment currently seen in metal converting plants,” said company president Dave Hudson. “The system offers a user friendly, streamlined design with optimal safety features. The Infinite Web® automatically prepares the coil ends and delivers the finest weld possible each and every time the Start button is touched, all in less than 3 minutes.”

“The Infinite Web® is poised to change the metal converting industry forever.”

For more information, visit: www.joiningtech.com/infiniteweb

Joining Technologies, Inc., an innovator in industrial laser applications, announces that it will be speaking at the 2012 ASM Annual Spring Symposium on Advanced Joining, to be held at the GE Global Research Center, Niskayuna, NY, May 15-16, 2012.

Tim Biermann, director of research and development for Joining Technologies Research Center (JTRC) will be presenting Laser Additive Manufacturing – From R&D to Production, at Session II, Advanced Joining Technique, on May 15th from 2:50-3:35, in Steinmetz Hall. The presentation will review the different laser additive manufacturing processes available and focus on their pros and cons. It will also chart the sometimes difficult route from feasibility studies to full scale production.

Mr. Biermann will cover examples of successful projects, based on the experience of JTRC and its collaboration partner,Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology (ILT).

For more information, visit: www.asmeasternny.org/spring-symposium.html

Joining Technologies, Inc., an innovator in industrial laser applications, announces that it will be speaking at the Fabricators & Manufacturers Association, International (FMA)’s Advanced Laser Applications Workshop (ALAW) 2011. The event will be held May 3-5, at The Inn at St. John’s, in Plymouth, MI. Scott Boynton, systems engineer, will be speaking on A Laser Cutting and Welding System for Splicing Strip Alloy.

Mr. Boynton’s talk will focus on Joining Technologies’ Infinite Web® all-in-one coil joiner. The system is noted for its non-contact splicing process that incorporates laser cutting and welding with a single head. The Infinite Web is currently being updated to enable the splicing of Titanium coils as well as splicing on a 15 degree bias as an alternative to forming perpendicular joints.

“The Infinite Web dramatically increases throughput, with some customers reporting a greater than 33 percent increase in plant-wide productivity resulting from improved efficiency and capabilities,” said Mr. Boynton. “The theme of this year’s ALAW event is Lasers: Reawakening American Pride in Manufacturing and I truly believe the Infinite Web is a great example of American ingenuity at its finest.”

Designed by welders to handle material thicknesses from 0.002-inch to 0.040-inch, the Infinite Web uses coaxial optics to verify proper positioning and provide precise and accurate splices. Both cutting and welding operations are automatic and non-contact.

Headquartered in East Granby, CT, Joining Technologies is an innovator in precision fusion processes, including laser and electron beam welding, laser additive manufacturing, and weld system design and integration. The company’s extraordinary engineering talent continues to develop economical solutions for joining metal components primarily in the medical device, sensors, aerospace, military, energy, and firearms industries.

For more information visit: www.joiningtech.com

Joining Technologies, an innovator in laser cladding, electron beam and laser welding applications, announces that it will showcase its laser additive manufacturing capabilities at the Society of Manufacturing Engineers’ AeroDef Manufacturing Exposition and Conference, to be held Apr. 5-7, 2011 at the Anaheim Convention Center in Anaheim, CA.

Joining Technologies has launched a new laser additive manufacturing division, and entered into a formal Cooperation Agreement with world-renowned laser development and contract research institute Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology (ILT). The resulting partnership,Joining Technologies Research Center (JTRC), will be showcased at AeroDef.

Fraunhofer ILT’s Dr. Ingo Kelbassa will give a presentation entitled, “Additive BLISK Manufacture,” discussing the qualification and certification of laser metal deposition (LMD) for the green manufacture of new and future generation parts such as BLISKs (BLade Integrated DiSKs) made from Nickel and Titanium base alloys. The presentation discusses the method from feasibility studies, through process development, to a first additive BLISK-mock-up manufacture for an HPC BLISK made from Inconel 718.

As part of JTRC, Fraunhofer ILT will be providing laser additive manufacturing research and development services, as well as system design and integration and accessory sales, including nozzles and cladding heads, all from its new facility in East Granby, CT. The JTRC partnership will offer a range of services, from feasibility studies via process development, validation and certification, to systems engineering and system integration of a customized industrial solution at a customer’s site.

“Our new partnership with Fraunhofer ILT combines the precision and reliability of Joining Technologies’ laser cladding processes with ILT’s cutting edge laser additive research and development capabilities,” said Scott Poeppel, Joining Technologies’ manager of additive processes. “The JTRC partnership offers customers enhanced information on using laser additive manufacturing for repair or restoration in aerospace, power generation, valve, and OEM-supplied component applications.”

Dr. Ingo Kelbassa, vice and academic director of LLT, RWTH Aachen University and head of the RWTH LLT department at Fraunhofer ILT, expects the JTRC partnership will offer a range of services from feasibility studies through final industrial implementation. “By using such process-specific advantages as nearly unrestricted geometrical freedom, material freedom and achievable thermo-mechanical properties of the parts built-up, it is possible to manufacture parts designed specifically for their function,” said Dr. Kelbassa. “Laser additive manufacturing can therefore be considered as the key enabler for the green manufacturing of new and future generation parts.”

Dr. Kelbassa is also the responsible representative of LLT, RWTH Aachen University for basic and fundamental cooperative R&D initiatives in China as well as Fraunhofer ILT’s representative for cooperative applied science projects in North America and Australia.

Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology is an internationally known laser development and contract research institute with more than 250 employees and 10,000m² of usable floor space, fitted out with the latest technical and scientific infrastructure and equipment. It focuses on the development of new laser beam sources and components, the use of modern laser measurement and testing technology, and laser-supported manufacturing. It is also working in the area of laser plant technology and process control.

AeroDef Manufacturing is an event that provides manufacturing solutions for the unique needs of aerospace and defense manufacturers. The even aims to find new sources of innovation that can drive efficiencies throughout the manufacturing process and maintain U.S. defense and commercial superiority.

For more information on Aerodef visit: www.aerodefevent.com

Joining Technologies, an innovator in laser cladding, electron beam and laser welding applications, announces that it has launched a new laser additive manufacturing division, and entered into a formal Cooperation Agreement with world-renowned laser development and contract research institute Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology (ILT).

The resulting partnership, Joining Technologies Research Center (JTRC), will be showcased at the Laser Institute of America (LIA) 3rd annual Laser Additive Manufacturing (LAM) Workshop, to be held February 16-17, 2011 at the Sheraton North Houston Hotel, in Houston, TX. The LAM Workshop will bring industry specialists, executives, users and researchers from around the world to show how cladding and direct manufacturing can be applied effectively and affordably to manufacturing challenges.

As part of JTRC, Fraunhofer ILT will be providing laser additive manufacturing research and development services, as well as system design and integration and accessory sales, including nozzles and cladding heads, all from its new facility in East Granby, CT.

“Our new partnership with Fraunhofer ILT will provide numerous benefits to customers,” said Scott Poeppel, Joining Technologies’ manager of additive processes. “Combining the precision and reliability of Joining Technologies’ laser cladding processes with ILT’s cutting edge laser additive research and development capabilities offers customers enhanced information on using laser additive manufacturing for repair or restoration in aerospace, power generation, valve, and OEM-supplied component applications.”

Tailor-made laser additive manufacturing solutions are being developed for direct photonic production from CAD data to a part made from serial materials; maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) of high value components; and wear and corrosion protection.

Dr. Ingo Kelbassa, vice and academic director of LLT, RWTH Aachen University and head of the RWTH LLT department at Fraunhofer ILT, expects the JTRC partnership will offer a range of services from feasibility studies via process development, validation and certification, to systems engineering and system integration of a final industrial implementation at a customer’s site. “By using such process-specific advantages as nearly unrestricted geometrical freedom, material freedom and achievable thermo-mechanical properties of the parts built-up, it is possible to manufacture parts designed specifically for their function,” said Dr. Kelbassa. “Laser additive manufacturing can therefore be considered as the key enabler for the green manufacturing of new and future generation parts.”

Dr. Kelbassa is also the responsible representative of LLT, RWTH Aachen University for basic and fundamental cooperative R&D initiatives in China as well as Fraunhofer ILT’s representative for cooperative applied science projects in North America and Australia.

Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology is an internationally known laser development and contract research institute with more than 250 employees and 10,000m² of usable floor space, fitted out with the latest technical and scientific infrastructure and equipment. It focuses on the development of new laser beam sources and components, the use of modern laser measurement and testing technology, and laser-supported manufacturing. It is also working in the area of laser plant technology and process control.

About Joining Technologies
Headquartered in East Granby, CT, Joining Technologies is an innovator in precision fusion processes, including laser and electron beam welding, laser additive manufacturing, and weld system design and integration. The company’s extraordinary engineering talent continues to develop economical solutions for joining metal components primarily in the medical device, sensors, aerospace, military, energy, and firearms industries. Joining Technologies has created a corporate culture that rewards innovation and teamwork, and continues to invest in infrastructure, making it the most highly evolved and reliable operation of its kind. For more information, call 1.800.266.1966, email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or visit http://www.joiningtech.com

Joining Technologies, an innovator in laser cladding, electron beam and laser welding applications, announces its laser technology is playing a key role in the Connecticut Corsair project, a volunteer effort aimed at restoring Connecticut’s official state aircraft, the F4U Corsair. Joining Technologies’ laser equipment is helping restore worn-out parts and components to their original form.

Flown extensively during WWII, the F4U Corsair was the first US military single engine aircraft to fly faster than 400 miles per hour. The plane was fully designed and built in Connecticut and was designated the state’s official state aircraft in 2005. The Connecticut Corsair project is restoring a plane built in 1945 and sold as scrap metal by the US Navy in 1957.

The goal of the Connecticut Corsair project is to restore the aircraft to flying condition. However, functioning components are not available anymore; even the plane’s spare parts are extremely worn-out. Connecticut Corsair is therefore turning to modern technology to salvage parts once considered unsalvageable.

Joining Technologies, also headquartered in Connecticut, is providing its laser technology and expertise to the project. Through computer-aided design and modern laser technology, the company is modeling parts and restoring components back to original shape. “As a Connecticut business, we are proud to be a part of the Corsair restoration project,” said company founder and CEO Mike Francoeur. “It’s very exciting that the power of modern technology is putting an historic aircraft back in the air.”

For more information, visit: www.joiningtech.com/blog/JTVB0021.html

Joining Technologies, an innovator in laser additive, electron beam and laser welding applications, will feature its capabilities in booth #1341 at POWER-GEN International, held December 14-16 in Orlando, Florida. The company recently opened a laser additive manufacturing facility to house its new 6 axis laser cladding work cell and other equipment related to the laser additive process.

Joining Technologies is the exclusive provider of Laser Applied Powder surface restoration technology (LAP®). The technology creates true metallurgical bonds between virtually unlimited metal types and is ideal for applications in aerospace, power-generation, valve and OEM-supplied components. Precisely focused lasers allow Joining Technologies to create extremely small heat affected and dilution zones for superior strength, hardness and performance.

Joining Technologies’ new facility, located in East Granby, CT, is dedicated to laser additive processes. With drive through and dock height access, the building has the capacity to manipulate parts up to 7.5 tons and contains automated laser cladding and direct manufacturing equipment able to process parts up to 40 feet long.

“We are very excited to showcase our expanded laser additive capabilities at this year’s POWER-GEN show,” said company president Dave Hudson. “Our laser cladding process offers unprecedented precision and reliability, allowing us to effectively enhance, repair or free-form material for a wide variety of applications.”

Joining Technologies will also showcase its laser cutting technologies at the show. The company will highlight its capability to provide 4-axis cutting with a cut width of just 0.0015” (1.5 thousandths of an inch). This very narrow cut width reduces heat input to the part, minimizing discoloration and warping.

For more information about Joining Technologies, please stop by booth #1341.

Source: PRWeb

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