Cincinnati Incorporated

Cincinnati Incorporated (4)

Cincinnati Incorporated (CI) has named industry veteran Rakesh Kumar as Vice President of sales, marketing and service. Kumar, a metal fabrication industry veteran, comes to CI from Amada, where he spent more than 20 years in engineering, manufacturing, production control, solution center management and sales.

Kumar’s appointment continues the company’s expansion of its sales and service teams to provide a high level of brand experience as it enters new markets and increases its presence in established markets. “Rakesh is known throughout the fabrication industry and his wealth of experience brings a unique perspective to our customer relations,” said Cary Chen, President and CEO of CI. “He is a hands-on person, who understands that the right solution can have a huge impact on a shop’s operations.”

Kumar studied mechanical engineering at Osmania University and Arizona State University. A track record of increasing sales and satisfied customers follows Kumar to CI, a company with a long history in metal fabrication. “This is a great opportunity to bring my knowledge and approach to a company with a great history, as well as a great future,” said Kumar. “There is a lot of excitement around the additive initiative and CI still provides some of the best press brakes and lasers in the industry.”

Cincinnati Incorporated provides manufacturers throughout North America with laser cutting and automation, as well as other metal fabrication solutions, including press brakes, shears and conveyor systems, powder metal presses, and most recently, the BAAM (Big Area Additive Manufacturing) large-part additive and SAAM (Small Area Additive Manufacturing) systems.

Cincinnati Incorporated has named This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it regional sales engineer for northern California, Nevada, Utah, and southern Idaho. Frontino brings five-plus years of project management experience and holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Nevada, Reno. Frontino is stepping into the territory long-held by Mike Malatesta, who, after 30 years with CI, is retiring. “CINCINNATI’s legacy is based on exceeding customer expectations by providing innovative, durable, and high performance machine tools with exceptional service,” said Frontino. “CI’s complete line of press brakes, shears and lasers will be represented in my region, along with the high level of service that CI customers have come to expect.”

“Our sales strategy in the U.S. is to establish direct sales and application support in the appropriate locations,” said John Prevish, national sales manager, Cincinnati Incorporated. “This is a well-established region, and Kristina will continue to strengthen and grow the relationships in this market.” According to Prevish, Cincinnati continues to expand its direct sales and service teams to provide a high level of customer service regionally.

Cincinnati Incorporated provides manufacturers throughout North America with accurate, dependable laser cutting and automation, as well as metal fabrication equipment, including press brakes, shears and conveyor systems, powder metal presses, and most recently, BAAM (Big Area Additive Manufacturing) large-part additive and SAAM (Small Area Additive Manufacturing) systems.

CI will demonstrate the versatility of additive manufacturing at Fabtech with displays featuring a full size Shelby Cobra automobile, a scaled fighter jet, a 12-ft. kayak, and a utility vehicle that were all produced using the new Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) system. The carbon and glass fiber reinforced ABS plastic materials for these displays were provided by SABIC and Techmer Engineered Solutions. The large-scale additive machine uses a steel fabricated chassis and advanced linear drive motors as the base, and extrudes hot thermoplastic to build parts, layer by layer. The machine, developed as part of a cooperative research and development agreement between CI and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, introduces significant new manufacturing capabilities to a wide range of industries including automotive, aerospace, marine, appliance and many more.

The BAAM machine on display at Fabtech has a work envelope of 65”x140”x34” and extrusion rate of about 38 lbs/hr and will be printing parts made with SABIC’s THERMOCOMP™ compound, an ABS carbon fiber material which provides excellent strength-to-weight ratio and high stiffness.  CI makes a larger size that has a work envelope of 8 x 20 x 6 ft. with an extrusion rate of about 100 lbs/hr. The machine prints polymer components up to 10 times larger than currently producible, at speeds 1,000 times faster than existing additive machines. The machine’s extruder uses a wide variety of thermoplastics and fiber reinforced thermoplastics to meet the needs of a variety of commercial applications, including furniture and tooling.

“All of the displays will show the art of the possible with additive manufacturing,” said Carey Chen, President and CEO of Cincinnati Incorporated. “ The kayak display will be shown as 1/3 raw additive material (ABS carbon fiber), 1/3 filled with gel coat, and 1/3 finished and painted, demonstrating the phases of finishing 3D printed parts. These displays will have a huge ‘wow’ factor at the show because they show how large-part additive manufacturing can be applied in our daily lives.”

In addition to the four displays, the company will have two exhibits. The BAAM machine will be on display in booth N-9000 in the entrance to the North Hall of Chicago’s McCormick Place, while the new electric 40-ton GOFORM press brake will be demonstrated in booth S-2799 in the South Hall. The South Hall booth will include a large video wall with unique footage angles of CI’s laser cutting systems, automation, and press brakes.

For more information, visit: www.e-ci.com

Cincinnati Incorporated (CI) is ready to make noise at Fabtech promoting the company’s latest technologies, including the Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) machine that had manufacturers buzzing at IMTS last year when it printed a full-size car at the show. The BAAM machine, with a 6 x 12 x 3 ft work envelope, will be on display in booth N-9000 in the Grand Concourse Lobby of the North Hall of Chicago’s McCormick Place.

The large-scale additive machine uses the chassis, drives and control of CI’s laser cutting system as the base, and extrudes hot thermoplastic to build parts, layer-by-layer. The machine, developed as part of a cooperative research and development agreement between CI and Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL), introduces significant new manufacturing capabilities to a wide range of industries including automotive, aerospace, marine, furniture and much more.

CI is a technology leader in manufacturing press brakes, shears and laser cutting systems for metal fabricating, as well as big area additive manufacturing. In addition, CI powdered metal compacting presses are the most advanced additive process used for high volume production metal parts. PM presses cost-effectively make high volume production parts that make cars lighter and more efficient.

“We developed and pioneered the use of high-speed linear-motor axis drives on laser cutting systems and now the same technology is taking us into the next generation of machine tools,” said Carey Chen, President and CEO of CI. “BAAM is driving a spirit of renewal at CI, as there has been a tremendous response to the machine and the impact it has on manufacturing processes. This sense of rejuvenation also led to a new branding initiative and website, so this is having a positive impact on our entire company.”

The proprietary linear motor drives are capable of reaching accelerations in excess of 2.0G and head positioning speeds of up to 12,000 in./min., to deliver positioning accuracy of ±0.001 in. per axis. Chen added, “This machine platform has been field tested and proven to be virtually trouble free, and the linear motor drive allows fast and precise positioning, required for proper 3D printing.”

A larger version BAAM machine, currently at ORNL, has a work envelope of 8 x 20 x 6 ft. and extrusion rate of about 40 lbs/hr, the machine prints polymer components up to 10 times larger than currently producible, at speeds 200 to 500 times faster than existing additive machines. SABIC Innovative Plastics purchased the first BAAM machine and provided the carbon fiber ABS plastic for the IMTS car and will be providing material for BAAM at the Fabtech show.

The BAAM extruder uses a wide variety of thermoplastics and fiber reinforced thermoplastics and the two companies plan to test a number of materials that will meet the needs of a variety of commercial applications. “We’ve already tested ABS, PPS, PEKK and Ultem, and found that carbon fiber and glass fiber reinforcing improve both the strength and thermal stability of the parts,” added Chen.

For more information, visit: www.e-ci.com

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